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Kedleston Hall – more photos from my ‘jolly.’ Part two: Peacock dresses, Eastern Museums and more…

February 26, 2017
Kedleston Hall Derbyshire (c) Jane Risdon 2016

Kedleston Hall Derbyshire (c) Jane Risdon 2016

I know this is my Author Blog about my writing and with guest authors, but every now and again I think it is nice to share some of my little trips – what I call ‘Jollies,’ to some of the fabulous houses, gardens, countryside, villages, churches and cathedrals in England.

So here I am sharing a ‘Jolly’ with you all.

My visit to Kedleston Hall

last year was a wonderful experience and I wish I could have spent longer there.

Displayed in the Eastern Museum (c) Jane Risdon 2016

Displayed in the Eastern Museum (c) Jane Risdon 2016

The house is beautiful and so are the grounds, but there is also a fabulous collection of artefacts inside, some of which I managed to photograph as well.

Since I didn’t have room to post more photos on Part One of my ‘jolly’ to Kedleston, I’ve decided to continue with Part Two.

‘Grant me ye Gods, a pleasant seat,

In attick elegance made neat,

Fine lawns. much wood, and water plenty,

(Of deer and herds, and flocks not scanty)

Laid out in such an uncurb’d taste,

That nature mayn’t be lost but grac’d.’

In his youth the 1st Lord Scarsdale dreamt of creating such an idyllic landscape at Kedleston, and with Robert Adams help, he succeeded.

The park is man-made but looks completely natural.

It was created almost completely to Adam’s unique design at the same time he worked on the house.

Lord Curzon was fascinated by art and architecture, and accumulated his collection of Eastern artefacts during his tours of Asia in 1887,1890 and 1894 and whilst Viceroy of India, 1899-1905.

Kedleston Hall front view (c) Jane Risdon 2016

Kedleston Hall front view (c) Jane Risdon 2016

The Library (c) Jane Risdon 2016

The Library (c) Jane Risdon 2016

 

Front view from Kedleston Hall (c) Jane Risdon 2016

Front view from Kedleston Hall (c) Jane Risdon 2016

As per his Will, he divided his collection between the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the museum he created at Kedleston – The Eastern Museum.

The Eastern Museum (c) Jane Risdon 2016

The Eastern Museum (c) Jane Risdon 2016

Some of the items I saw on display reminded me of artefacts my own Grandfather brought back from India where he served with the British Indian Army from about 1927 until Partition in 1947. 

When I was a little girl I was fascinated by some of his wonderful carved tables,

ornaments and rugs for the walls;  too many amazing items to list here.

I can recall the smell of the wood (camphor, I think) that filled the rooms of his house.

I could smell the same smell in the Eastern Museum.

Centrepiece of the Eastern Museum is a dress worn by Mary, Lady Curzon in 1903.

The Peacock Dress worn by Lady Curzon at the Dehli Durbar in 1903. (c) Jane Risdon 2016

The Peacock Dress worn by Lady Curzon at the Dehli Durbar in 1903. (c) Jane Risdon 2016

It is famous and is known as The Peacock Dress.

She wore it to the evening ball which followed the Coronation of Durbar in Delhi 1903 – the high point of Curzon’s term as Viceroy.

The dress was embroidered by Indian craftsmen with metal thread and jewels on cloth of gold in the pattern of a peacock’s feathers, so that it would glisten in a room lit by electricity.

The dress was acquired by HM Government in lieu of Inheritance Tax when her daughter died.

Ivory Furniture (c) Jane Risdon 2016

Ivory Furniture (c) Jane Risdon 2016

In the Eastern Museum (c) Jane Risdon 2016

In the Eastern Museum (c) Jane Risdon 2016

In the Eastern Museum (c) Jane Risdon 2016

In the Eastern Museum (c) Jane Risdon 2016

The Trophy Corridor was originally an arcade, glazed and made wider by Lord Curzon who hung his game trophies there and  displayed his natural history specimens.

In the Trophy Corridor (c) Jane Risdon 2016

In the Trophy Corridor (c) Jane Risdon 2016

Lord Curzon also had a collection of taxidermy. Delightful!

In the Dining Room (c) Jane Risdon 2016

In the Dining Room (c) Jane Risdon 2016

Collection of feathers (c) Jane Risdon 2016

Collection of feathers (c) Jane Risdon 2016

From the Eastern Museum (c) Jane Risdon 2016

From the Eastern Museum (c) Jane Risdon 2016                                                                                 

Door with hidden hinges Kedleston Hall (c) Jane Risdon 2016

Door with hidden hinges Kedleston Hall (c) Jane Risdon 2016

Chair from Trophy Corridor (c) Jane Risdon 2016

Chair from Trophy Corridor (c) Jane Risdon 2016

Every room had something of interest but there wasn’t much information of the printed variety. Each room was occupied by a person knowledgeable enough to explain everything on view and to answer many questions. My companions were particularly interested in the way the doors were made, how the furnishing were crafted, and asked many questions to which they sometimes received very complex answers which thankfully made total sense to the gentleman asking. One question involved the door shown which does not have any visible hinges. I wish I could recall how it was done, but after about ten minutes of detailed discussion I am afraid my mind glazed over. It was fascinating but it got a bit too technical for me.

From the Trophy Corridor (c) Jane Risdon 2016

From the Trophy Corridor (c) Jane Risdon 2016                                                                                                                                                                                      There is also a lovely church right next to the house and in my next post I will post my photos and some information about it so do come back soon.  Let me know what you think so far…                                                                     All Photos (c) Jane Risdon 2016 All Rights Reserved.                                                     

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18 Comments
  1. Why not include this on your author page? Some times my writing is fueled and forged much more by the days I walk away from my computer and go live life then it is hitting away at the keys. I come back recharged and with renewed life experiences to draw from. Thank you for your interest in my blog. I look forward to following yours and reading more!

    Liked by 1 person

    • My author page on Facebook? My publisher is admin. Thanks for the suggestion, I’ll ask. 🙂

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      • Oh no, I was referring to how you wrote that maybe that post didn’t match with the theme of your blog – being that it was an author blog but the post was about travel. I would have been more clear if I said: Why not have this post on this blog? Haha. I hope I cleared up what I meant. Congrats on your successes as a writer!

        Liked by 1 person

        • My Home page here says this: Welcome to my author blog. I post about my writing, things I enjoy such as photography and life in general. Feel free to look around, comment and get involved. I love to hear from you and especially new visitors. Your visit is appreciated. I think that says what I want. But you make a good point, thanks. Thanks for your kind wishes too. 🙂 x

          Liked by 1 person

    • Oh thanks Anna, it has been going 5 years now. Have a good round, you might find more you like, great to have you visit.

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  2. Gorgeous pictures and such fascinating tidbits of information. Hmm, wonder if HMRC would accept one of my old dresses for tax purposes…

    Liked by 1 person

    • I wonder. You have got to scratch your head at such things. Thanks so much, did you see part one? I am also writing part three. 🙂

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  3. Very beautiful, indeed “Sweet Lady Jane”….my only interest though is that magnificent desk ! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • LOL me too that desk is something else, it has drawers all the way round and each end pulls out to take deeds or long pieces of document. Such a dream study. I am about to post (end of the week) part three – you may enjoy that too. Did you like part one?

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  4. You always have the loveliest trips, Jane! And those ‘photos are fantastic. And that peacock dress – sumptuous! Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • These houses are grand in every sense…imagine the cost of the up keep for staff alone. So much history too. Part one and two are complete, and I am working on part three. Glad you liked. You are still getting comments by the way. 🙂 xx

      Liked by 1 person

  5. jfredlee permalink

    Thanks, Jane, for taking us to Kedleston Hall. The grounds are magnificent, and the interior must have kept you immersed and enjoying the Hell out of it for hours. Love your ‘jollies’ and thank you for sharing with us.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Most welcome Jeff, I had so much to share from the visit, I have not only posted parts one and two, I am working on part three too. I must have taken over 100 photos. Crazy me!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. wonderful pictures Jane. I couldn’t stop my mind being full of Rudyard Kipling as I looked at them. The dress is incredible. Thanks so much for sharing these.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is fantastic, the photo doesn’t do it justice…did you see Part One of this jolly? I am working on Part three too. I also did a rip to Batemans a years or so again and did a blog on the house and grounds…it is here if you scroll through the blog on the menu or go to archive and hit 2014/2015 not sure when….let me know if you do. 🙂 Thanks xx

      Like

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