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West Green House and Garden: Hangman Hawley, Shenanigans with the Housekeeper, and IRA Bombs – life on a country estate.

September 20, 2015
West Green House and Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green House and Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

I know I am in danger of becoming a visitor attraction blogger, but I am not – honestly!

It’s just that when given the opportunity to visit some of the most gorgeous cathedrals,  castles, villages, houses and gardens, we have in England, I feel it my duty to share what I see with all of you.  It would be so mean not to.

Recently I was given another little treat out and this time to a gem of a place I never knew existed:

West Green House and Garden.

West Green House and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green House and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The 18th century house and gardens sit in a quiet corner of Hampshire – the epitome of a small English manor house – surrounded by farmland. The whole estate covers 10 acres I believe.

Country Life described it as “embowered in trees, with quiet old world gardens spreading around it. This charming building seems the perfect embodiment of tranquil contentment and serenity of spirit, yet there hovers over it the unquiet ghost…”.

To get there is a joy in itself.  

Driving down leafy narrow country lanes, passing huge well established houses set back from the road, with long winding driveways, nestling within their own landscaped grounds.  The area exudes money and establishment.  But I loved it.

West Green Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

I loved the fields with grazing horses, the dappled sunshine hitting the road through the leafy canopy of ancient trees and hedgerows, and the silence – apart from birds complaining loudly, as they streaked from their hiding places above our heads, as the car wound its way cautiously along lanes still abundant in summer flowering weeds and foliage.

The air was fresh but with underlying scents and fragrances only the countryside can yield. 

We drove into a large field next to the grand house, set aside as a car park for visitors.  

Green houses could be seen across from us, visible through a row of several varieties of apple tree, groaning with fruit to our left.  

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

We were later informed it is a bumper year for English apples: the weather and all that.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

I should mention that The Mater was with us on this particular trip, designed to be easy for her to manage, with plenty of places to sit and rest her 85-year-old legs if necessary.  There was also a lovely little tea room with tables outside, for when she wanted her coffee fix.

West Green apples (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green apples (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sadly for her and luckily for us, there weren’t any Edinburgh Wool Shops for her to peruse – but let’s no go there!

Back to the fun part.

During the past 100 years West Green has undergone four periods of transformation apparently.

West Green House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

It was built by General Henry Hawley who is often described as ‘Hangman Hawley’ after the ghastly brutalities he perpetrated in the 1745 Rebellion, particularly at Culloden.  

Scottish readers might not want to dwell on this when thinking about visiting the house.

Cute Restrooms (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Cute Restrooms (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Hawley was a bit of a lad I think.  He left his estate to his housekeeper’s second son, William Toovey Hawley, whose descendants lived at West Green until 1898;  seems the wages of sin might not be death after-all! I think we can all imagine what the general got up to.

Garden Rooms at West Green (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Garden Rooms at West Green (c) Jane Risdon 2015

At the beginning of the last century the Playfair family employed architect Robert Weir Schulz to remodel the north front of the house and design new gardens, but after 5 years the family left West Green and a new owner, Evelyn, Duchess of Wellington, continued to perfect the gardens.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Duchess, later with her cousin, Yvonne Fitzroy, lived and gardened at the house until 1939, largely through the generosity of Sir Victor Sassoon, who bought the house for the Duchess until her death in 1939 – why don’t I ever meet someone like that?

Anyway, Sir Victor left West Green to the National Trust (I adore the NT) in 1957, but it did not actually become Trust property until Miss Fitzroy died in 1971.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

The National Trust’s first tenant was Lord Alistair McAlpine (tar-mac roads come to mind), whose lasting contribution to the house and gardens is a collection of neo-classical ornaments designed by the architect, Quinlan Terry.

In 1990 the IRA (Irish Republican Army) detonated a bomb inside the forecourt, causing so much damage that the Trust considered demolishing the house.  I have no idea why the IRA wanted to bomb it.

Chinese Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Chinese Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Subsequently, Australian Marylyn Abbott, purchased the lease in 1993 and the National Trust relinquished  their financial and management commitment to the property for this period, and Ms Abbott began the painstaking task of rebuilding and making a new garden; so beginning a new era in the history of the house – restoring its ‘serenity of spirit’.

Bird CAge Island (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Bird Cage Island (c) Jane Risdon 2015

I thought the whole place was just magical.  The house wasn’t open to the public, though I understand you can book a private tour in advance. The gardens are so pretty, well designed, and easy to walk around.  We didn’t see everything, but we managed to get around most of the formal gardens which were delightful.

Each year flamboyant designs of fruit, flowers, herbs, and vegetables are planted in the last week of March, and great pride is taken to ensure the planting is never exactly the same, so the gentleman at the entrance, taking our money, informed us.

Vegetables and Plants together (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Vegetables and Plants together (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Apple and pear trees of all varieties have been planted everywhere.  Some climbing overhead, trained like roses upon arches, others close to the ground interwoven with seasonal planting.  Wigwams of sweet peas, stands of corn, sunflowers, pots of artichokes, arbours of peas, beans and nasturtiums add height to regimental lines of vegetables and flowers.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

 Always planted in shades of the same colour, it can be all red, or yellow, or orange, or perhaps it is a contrasting black and white year so we were told.

 Two vegetable patches are planted each season, sometimes one is planted as a story garden.

Near the entrance there are two brilliantly painted red dragons by Nick Muscamp, which rise out of dozens of spring-flowering black red paeonies supported by clipped cloud trees, framed by hornbeams.

Dragons (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Dragons (c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

Two tiled pagodas were the inspiration for this part of the garden that border the path to the lake field.

We passed a lake with a Chinese style bridge crossing over to an island where ducks, swans, and geese lazed around watching us, watching them.

Chinese Bridge to Bird Cage Island (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Chinese Bridge to Bird Cage Island (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The island is called Bird Cage Island; there is a large bird-cage there funnily enough.

All plants in this area are of Oriental origin and a small group of red toned Acer Palmatum complete this garden, making superb Autumn colour, we were told.

Acers (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Acers (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The lakes reclamation and its follies had been the largest undertaking in the restoration of the gardens. Choked with weeds, leaking, its surrounds thick with brambles, the lake had become a swamp and was remade in 1990.

 Nearby there was an obelisk – a monument to a Gardner working there some 40 years.

Monument to a gardener (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Monument to a gardener (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The lake field contains the architect Quinlan Terry’s most notable collection of small designs: a Doris Temple, a Grotto, to control the lakes overflow, a stylised cage for pheasants with a bronze roof, topped with a large Pineapple which, in Victorian times, was a symbol of wealth.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Arcadian lake field is entered to the east guarded by Chinoiserie pagodas and from the Walled Garden through old iron gates that open on to an ornamental pond, said to have been a medieval stew pond. 

Paradise Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Paradise Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Walled Garden is entered through a frame of old Wisteria Senensis, opening on to a design that forms two patterns.  There is a feeling of mystery and age captured by the planting and design here.

Parterres in the traditional French manner – tightly clipped box hedges forming hearts and ovals – decorated by topiary balls, cones, and pom poms, are simple and striking to see.  In one walled garden a chequer board parterre is the centre-piece for an ‘Alice’ garden filled with flowers from the story, in red and white.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

There is a Paradise courtyard inspired by traditional Islamic gardens, planted by Marylyn Abbott in 2004, with a simple design of water, trees, and grass framed by the white trunks of Betula Utilis var Jacquemonti.  The trees in the island are Malus ‘Evereste’ that appear to be growing from small pots, but are in fact rooted in the earth.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

There are several water gardens and the grandest is the Nymphaem, whose focal point is a wall designed by Quinlan Terry, modelled on the fountain of Santa Maria della Scala in the Via Garibaldi in Rome.

Two benches decorate the garden, specially commissioned white benches, designed by Jill Facer and Malcom Last, in 1999.

There is a garden with 5 bridges planted with blue and white Clematis and Wisteria and Japanese Cherry trees.

Open fields and rolling countryside is visible from various places in the garden, all adding to the beauty and simplicity of the gardens and house location.

The house can be glimpsed through iron gates with piers crowned with stone lions.  It is square in a colonnaded courtyard.  There are busts of gods, emperors and dukes looking down from niches in the house’s facade.  I loved the house.  It was perfectly formed and situated to my liking. 

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

In late July and early August West Green House hosts weekends of Opera in the Green Theatre. Set outside at night it has been described by Opera Critic, Michael White, as “Stylish, sassy; West Green House is one of the most charming new arrivals on the country house opera circuit, and one of the most promising. It dares to do what others don’t and does it with panache.”

There is a beautiful architect designed theatre, imaginative programming, and a ‘second’ performance of lights illuminating the garden, making West Green House Opera a unique occasion. We were informed.  My brother and I would love to try it next year and if we do, I’ll let you know all about it.

You can book and find out about programmes:  Tel: + 44 (0)1252 845582

On the way in and out of the gardens you pass through the inevitable Gift Shop, and I must say there were some lovely items for sale including a huge copper bath (distressed) on claw feet, and two amazing long narrow doors which I am sure an interior designer night love.  I’m not sure if they’d love the prices tags, but if you can afford it, the price never matters apparently.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

We had a quick wander through several green houses and conservatories, which were lovely to see, all designer lay-outs and expensive furniture,  and each had grape vines laden with fruit dripping from the roofs, proving too much of a temptation for someone who shall remain anonymous (don’t look at me), as did the apple trees on the way back to the car.  I gather a ‘certain someone’ was going to be having baked apples for desert the following day.

West Green House and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green House and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Gift Shop (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Gift Shop (c) Jane Risdon 2015

On the way home we stopped off for lunch at a 16th century pub called The Leather Bottle, which has really changed little since it was built, even though there had been a fire some 50 years ago, so I am reliably informed by the family Oracle with whom we never argue, mainly because we never win!

The Leather Bottle (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Leather Bottle (c) Jane Risdon 2015

You might be interested to know that the pub began life as three cottages.

The name Leather Bottle was often associated with pubs which dated before the time of glass bottles.  Leather bottles were hung outside such places to advertise they would provide refills for ale and wine there.

The pub eventually became the White Inn (1714).  Though it was also known as The Leather at various times in its history.

At the time Queen Anne died the area was becoming busy with coaches on their way from Reading to Southampton, and a toll road was in use.  The area was notorious for robbers and highwaymen – especially on the route from Basingstoke to Bagshot apparently, and William Davis (known as The Golden Farmer, because he only stole gold), used the pub until he was hanged at Tyburn in 1670.

Another to use the pub  was Colonel Blood – famous for attempting to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London, who gave himself the name Parson Blood at the time, in order to fool the Keeper of the Jewels.

He made sure he got to know the keeper of the jewels, Talbot Edwards, and used his nephew to chat the keeper’s daughter up and distract the keeper as he tried to steal them.  He failed and was caught.

The King (Charles 11) known for taking a liking to adventurous and outrageous folk, somehow decided to pardon Blood, and infuriated everyone by restoring the robber’s lands in Ireland, because his adventure amused him so much!  It is also thought that Colonel Blood may have agreed to spy for the king.

It seems crime does pay.

The Leather Bottle, Reading Road, Mattingly, Near Hook, Hampshire RG27 8JU

Tel: +44 (0)1189 326 371

http://www.leatherbottle.hcpr.co.uk 

I do hope you have enjoyed my brief trip around West Green House and Gardens – not forgetting the Leather Bottle, which you might like to visit.  The food is excellent and not ‘pub grub,’ by any means.  The chef is excellent too, at least when we dropped in.

If you fancy visiting West Green, here are the details:

West Green House and Gardens, near Hartley Wintney, Hampshire, opens Easter to September on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays.  Just turn up after about 11am.   The parking is free, but if it has rained take your wellies as the car park is in a field and the area around the lake is grass, and possibly a little muddy.   There is ‘Pick your Own’ available, and I don’t mean helping yourself.  You pay for what you pick.

More Information: Tel: +44 (0)1252 845582

West Green House and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green House and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Let me know if you ever find yourself visiting. I’d love to know what you think. I think it is an adorable place and would love to see much more of it at some point.  I took far too many photos – too many to share – but I hope those I have posted give you a flavour of the place.

All photographs (c) Jane Risdon 2015. All rights reserved.

UPDATE:  Since posting this I have been contacted by West Green (their lovely PR person)  and they have added my blog to their website.  Apparently Marylyn Abbott is thrilled with my piece and experiences there.

Here is their link – do visit as there is lots to see and experience there.

http://westgreenhouse.co.uk/

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53 Comments
  1. A very interesting tour of this garden, Jane. I love gardens and have made a note of this one. The wall with the round hole/tunnel through it is a great piece of architecture.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I loved that too Robbie, and it is a lovely garden to wander around relaxing, and not too big so you can do it all in an afternoon. I am going to be writing up Savile Garden, Windsor soon and also various places in the lakes but time is the thing. Do explore by blog as there are lots of ‘jollies’ there to enjoy, arboretums too…thanks so much and have a fab visit when you go. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. paulandruss permalink

    Excellent post about this beautiful place and your photos are stunning!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Yes, you’d be very mean indeed not to share this with us Jane!! 😉
    What a lovely post. Although living in Bonn, Germany, I’m a member of National Trust and love to be inspired to see more of the beauties all around England.
    Best regards from all of us,
    Dina

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dina, I am so happy to share my posts especially if you enjoy them. If you go through my blog you will find several about NT places and other lovely places I have visited. My blog is not just about my crime writing, but photos I love taking and places I love visiting. I have been to Bonn…spend a day there many years ago. I’ve lived in Germany twice for long periods. Beautiful country too. Do pop back soon. Fab chatting with you 🙂

      Like

      • fabulous review Jane..I can’t travel anymore due to illness but you have swept me away to this marvelous PARADISE via your memories and history and gorgeous photography!!!
        …THANK YOU!!!!!–Sheila Wolk 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sheila I am glad you enjoyed this. Do feel free to have a look around some of the other places I have visited and written about. There are several here you might enjoy, just go to menu/blog and scroll through. Let me know if you need help. Happy to give you a treat. 🙂

          Like

  4. Am loving your blog and pix, Jane, which, among other things, including the National Trust App, inspired us to visit West Green Gardens today. What a beautiful, tranquil, colourfully creative and inspiring place! Well worth our 4-hour round trip in the car from Worthing 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ann I am thrilled you are enjoying my blog, especially the garden features from time to time. And I am doubly thrilled you took the time and trouble to visit West Green..such a fab place and so worth it I am sure. Phew, big sigh of relief it lived up to my praises. If you visit Sissinghurst, Wakefield Place, or take a trip to Ightham Mote as a result of reading about them here, do let me know. I shall let the PR lady from West Green know…she posted my blog on their website and the owner Marylyn Abbott was dead chuffed apparently. I am happy 🙂

      Like

      • Ann permalink

        My pleasure, on all counts! 😊 We also love Sissinghurst … but currently have deserted Wakehurst (despite loving it long-term) because of the daft car parking charges recently introduced, and no reduction for NT members ! 😢

        Liked by 1 person

        • Yes my sister and I were at Wakehurst then they were testing the idea of the fees. I think NT membership has fallen in recent years but costs have not. I still think it is value for money, but I can see the car park fee could be a step too far. Happy you like the same places as I. Are you into cute villages and Churches, cathedrals and castles too? So pleased to have you here, do keep dropping in. Appreciate it. 🙂

          Like

          • Yes, villages, churches, castles, anything with history and beauty, and intrigue and interest! As you can see from my developing Pinterest boards! 🙂 Thinking of blogging, but maybe too much of a commitment at this stage!

            Liked by 1 person

            • Ann I only blog when I feel like it. About writing or whatever I fancy and don’t feel pressured. People follow and comment as and when I do…so go for it. I am sure you will be fab and so interesting. I don’t think I have seen your pinterest boards, but am sure they are fab. Not done that myself – no idea how. Just got round to Twitter which my publisher suggested I get a grip on…still finding my way. I’d love to see your Pinterest boards if they are not private 🙂

              Like

              • Hi Jane, thanks for the encouragement and inspiration! Might give it a whirl over the dark winter days. Pinterest is good fun (and free!) Great for your lovely pics (and good to promote your work, if you wanted to) … a kind of online photo album. Mine’s for pleasure now, and developing here https://www.pinterest.com/annbri/ But the overall Pinterest site is easy to find … just Google ‘pinterest’ and a whole new world appears!

                Liked by 1 person

                • Oh thanks for this, I shall take a look later on…am about to take my weekly test on what I’ve learned during my Forensic Course, Identifying the Dead, so need to go and take some deep breaths. It all sounds good…so will pop and look when I have done the deed and the lessons for today. Wish me luck! Enjoy your day 🙂

                  Like

  5. val risdon permalink

    Lovely pics Jane, and what a wonderful place to visit. You are so lucky.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Hi Jane. What a wonderful write-up of your visit with a wealth of photos. I’m a garden blogger and as a result of my efforts I now look after the online PR for this fabulous garden on a part-time basis. Would you mind if I put a link on the garden’s website and Facebook pages? You may have noticed I spotted your tweet yesterday. It’s great to show people how the garden is looking now and there’s still plenty to see 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • VP so happy to hear from you. I am very happy for you to do the links as I really enjoyed the visit and will go back. It was fabulous. Let me know how it goes and if you find more visits online. If you have a wander around my blog (mainly about my crime writing I know) you might be interested in some of the other gardens I visited and blogged about – Wakehurst Place, Igtham Mote, Sissinghurst and Knole House etc. Please do a ping-back to your various pages, blog and twitter too. For Info: My Facebook author page is http://www.facebook.com/JaneRisdon2. What a wonderful job you have. It must be sheer magic. Keep in touch, thanks so much – glad the blog was appreciated. 🙂

      Like

      • It’s now up on the News page of the website and Marylyn Abbott says ‘thank you’. She’s delighted!
        Thanks also for taking the trouble to find my photography blog and having a good rootle around in there 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • My pleasure, I am glad she is pleased. Tell her we had the most wonderful visit and appreciate all the hard work gone into the gardens. Staff really friendly and pleasant and helpful – a little spot of magic in a busy week. Mum had always wanted to go and for an 85 year old it was just comfortable for her to get round and find a seat when she needed it. I enjoyed a wander around your blog – always enjoy seeing what other people are up to. If I can help with any more photos for West Green, let me know. I took a lot!! I always take far too many. Sometimes they give me ideas for my crime writing…good places to bury bodies etc. but better not share that with the visitors, they might get ideas too. Have a brill day and let me know if I can help again. Enjoy your weekend. Jane xx

          Like

          • Thanks Jane 🙂 I have a friend in the States with similar tendencies – she writes crime/garden mystery eBooks. I’m currently tasked with trying to get her a viewing of filming Springwatch/Autumnwatch for her latest research! One of our cats is a ‘character’ in another of her mysteries 🙂

            Like

            • Ah yes Spring/Autumn Watch – fab series and so many others. We are very lucky having such great programmes here. I must look for your friend’s books…what is her name? Apologies for taking a while to reply. Only just seen this. 🙂

              Like

  7. All beautiful photos, but I particularly liked Paradise courtyard.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I loved the Paradise Courtyard too Kathy. The little fountains were delightful. There are 10 acres and so really hard to decide what to see and photograph, but such a lovely place to visit. Tranquil and serene is how I found it. Glad you enjoyed the photos. 🙂

      Like

    • Oh so did I Kathy. Lovely place to visit.

      Like

  8. What beautiful images.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Splendid Jane and thank you. I doubt I would get there so it is nice trip. Loved the apples and all the great photographs. Well done.
    Evelyn

    Liked by 1 person

    • Evelyn thanks for popping in. The variety of apples and pears was quite something…mother tried a few. There were damsons galore too…but we won’t go there. 🙂

      Like

  10. Yet another wonderful tour of a special place, Jane. Thank you. Now, did you ever learn what is meant by the “unquiet spirit” hovering around?

    Liked by 1 person

    • I didn’t but I think I shall try and find out. I did find out that the IRA bombed it because MacAlpine had links to Mrs Thatcher and they wanted to get at her via him! Such fun here: history, gardening, art, politics and so on…lol I learn something every time. Glad you enjoyed it. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • He was a IRA target in his own right as he was deputy chairman of the Conservative party.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Ah it makes sense, thanks so much. I don’t have a link to the website for West Green, do send it to me and I can add it to the post. Might generate more traffic. Thanks.

          Like

          • Here you are – I didn’t put it in my comment as I know WP is picky about links and spam. Fingers crossed this works… http://westgreenhouse.co.uk/

            Liked by 1 person

            • VP I’ve just had a comment here from someone who red my blog about West Green and travelled 4 hours in the car from Worthing to visit and loved it…she said it lived up to her expectations, having read my piece. So chuffed I could inspire someone to do that. 🙂

              Liked by 1 person

    • Cynthia so glad you have enjoyed these posts…what a fab time of year to visit now…:)

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I would love to go on some of these visits with you, Jane! Wonderful!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Stunning photos! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I really do enjoy these virtual tours, Jane. And what interesting history you do share. Isn’t it great to discover a place like that, with all sorts of great stories, but that isn’t overly touristy or crowded. I’m glad you enjoyed your visit! Oh, and lovely ‘photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I just love going to them Margot. So beautiful to see. I would have loved to have gone in the house, perhaps another time. My brother is thinking we might go to the night opera in the garden next year. If we do, I shall post. We are so lucky here to have easy access to tranquil and beautiful places. I find them inspirational. I am so happy you enjoy them. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  14. This is a very beautiful post. Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Thanks for sharing 🙂

    Like

  16. Thanks so much Sally, really appreciated. xx Such a lovely trip out too.

    Like

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – West Green House and Garden: Hangman Hawley, Shenanigans with the Housekeeper, and IRA Bombs – life on a country estate by Jane Risdon. | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life
  2. West Green House and Garden: Hangman Hawley, Shenanigans with the Housekeeper, and IRA Bombs – life on a country estate. |

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