Skip to content

Dancing Around Our Zimmer Frames with Generation Z

March 7, 2013
Let's Mosh Tonight

Let’s Mosh Tonight

Dancing Around Our Zimmer Frames with Generation Z

(c) Jane Risdon 2013

Since writing this piece in 2013, I have had several people read it again and mention it to me. The subject often comes up when talking about music and what life in a Residential Home might be for the Baby Boomers when they get to ‘that’ age.

I thought I’d share it again.  

I hope you enjoy it and it gets you thinking.  

I think we should start a movement to ensure that such places have a decent music collection available for those of us born in the 1950s and after,  for whom George Formby and Pearl Johnson and Teddy Carr – wonderful in their day –  is the stuff of nightmares.

At primary school we had Country dancing lessons and it was a good opportunity for the boys to grab the girls and fling them from one end of the gymnasium to the other when the ‘Caller,’ shouted, ‘Change partners.’

Later, at the Convent school we didn’t have dancing as it probably meant ‘touching’ each other, but we did dance around the May pole, trying not to tangle the ribbons or go the wrong way, which is a special feat one of my sisters still manages much to the totally cringing embarrassment of her children.

When we celebrated the crowning of Mary, Queen of The May, we sort of skipped about a bit in our white dresses, all very proper,  overseen by The Mother Superior, so there wasn’t any opportunity to grab or be grabbed.

Big school saw us learning how to do the ‘Dashing White Sergeant,’ and ‘The Gay Gordons,’ – nope, not a Gay Scottish dance! I was a dab hand at the ‘Valeta Snowball,’ in spite of the boys still wanting to fling me from one side of the Gym to the other whenever we had to be twirled.

About the same time as we were tripping the light fantastic with our pubescent male partners, The Beatles and Chubby Checker were doing ‘The Twist,’ and up and down the country the sexes danced apart and around each other.  Our school dances saw us all ‘twisting’ and ‘shaking it up baby,’  and doing ‘The March of The Mods,’ under the watchful eyes of various teachers, ensuring we didn’t ‘shake it up,’ too much behind the bike sheds in between dances.

Meantime, at various family weddings our parents still waltzed up and down, jitter-bugged and attempted to ‘Walk the dog,’ and ‘Do the locomotion,’ much to the horror of their children who watched ‘the oldies,’ making complete idiots of themselves.  I can recall my Dad nearly slipping a disc doing ‘The Twist,’ and hobbling off the dance floor much to my great relief, before I died of embarrassment in front of all the eligible young men I’d discovered lurking near the bar.

Towards the middle to late nineteen sixties something called a Discotheque appeared and every town had one so it seemed.  Our nearest town had one every Sunday afternoon in the old dance hall where my parents had quick stepped to the likes of Edmundo Ros, and smooched to Nat King Cole, when they were courting.

We were the generation who hoped ‘We all die before we get old,’ and who cringed at anyone over twenty-five, who we deemed ‘too old and over the hill,’ to know anything about life and us – teenagers.  We died of shame at them dancing, or behaving like we did.

The Discotheque (not known as a Disco at that time), was a cool place to hang out.  We could listen to the latest Singles and Long Playing Records (later known as albums), whilst checking out the opposite sex from underneath our Cathy McGowan fringes and Dusty Springfield blacked eyes, faces pale with Max Factor foundation, across the distance of table and chairs grouped round the outside of the dance floor.  There was something we all thought so sophisticated – from Italy – called Espresso (coffee), and we also had Pepsi Cola and Coca Cola in long-necked bottles with straws.  Such decadence.

The boys didn’t dance, they just stood and watched the girls and smoked.  The girls danced self-consciously in pairs or groups of four or five, around their handbags piled in the middle of them, on the floor.  There was a whole lot of shaking going on to The Mersey Beats,  The Beatles,  The Swinging Blue Jeans, Herman’s Hermits, The Walker Brothers, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, and the latest music from America; Sam and Dave, Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett, and all the Motown and Phil Spector bands and vocalists who were so new and exciting.  Suddenly we didn’t want to listen to Frank Ifield, Matt Munro or Frank Sinatra.

Summer of Love

Summer of Love

Woodstock and the Isle of Wight festivals led us into long flowing robes, free love and flower-power and boys with hair to their shoulders and hips to die for. We danced and swayed to Dylan,  Joan Baez, and Peter, Paul and Mary and Barry McGuire, who reminded us we were all ‘On the Eve of Destruction.’  No-one held each other to dance, everyone ‘did their own thing.’

It was The Summer of Love and we weren’t going to miss out.

Slam diving, stage diving, and moshing took over eventually and boys were back in the game, dancing on their own, throwing themselves around like the demented.  Girls stood and watched and kept money ready to make the 999 phone call to  summon an ambulance if one of them misjudged the crowd, and landed on their head and not in the arms of their mates, when they launched themselves off of speaker stacks and high stages.

Disco bounced into our lives with Donna Summer, The Bee Gees and John Travolta and we were all strutting our stuff under the mirrored globes in nightclubs, where lighted floors, strobes and laser lighting created monsters of us all, reflected in the mirrored walls.  Everyone dressed to impress.  Image was the thing.  We all had a swagger to our walk and the boys knew how to swagger the most.

By this time our children were ‘disco’ mad too and it was our turn to be the ‘oldies,’  not safe out alone and certainly not allowed on the dance floor in polite company.  They were ‘Dirty Dancing’ to ‘Fame,’ and ‘Grease,’ and  holding your partner became all the rage again.  But not for parents.  That was deemed ‘gross,’ and a step too far.

TV shows featuring ballroom dancing, Latin American dancing and everything in-between has taken off in a big way. 

When I was young we could watch Victor Silvester on his TV show ‘Come Dancing,’ – all sequins and taffeta – but only on a black and white set.

Which brings me to afternoon tea dances which are becoming more and more popular now, not that I could ever imagine myself at one, but people are going to them again.  I am not sure which generation.

Then I wonder about myself and my generation.  We still listen to the music of our youth, and our children enjoy it too, but we also listen to their music as well.  I think about my mother’s generation and The Big Bands of the nineteen forties and Rock and Roll of the nineteen fifties.

Whenever you see a nursing home or a retirement home on TV these days, the music they are singing along to is the music of their generation; Sinatra, Crosby and Guy Mitchell, Patsy Cline and so on.  They sing along to the piano player pounding out ‘Knees up mother Brown,’ and ‘Roll out the Barrel,’ and  I get a funny sensation as I wonder what my generation will be singing along to when we are in  nursing homes and the ‘entertainment’ turns up.

I have a vision of a row of tattooed women with face piercings, dancing around their Zimmer frames, watched by rows of elderly men, similarly tattooed and pierced, in sweat-shirts and jeans, longing for a joint and  a pint, singing along to ‘Rock and Roll,’ by Led Zeppelin, ‘My Generation,’ by The Who and ‘Dancing Queen,’ by Abba….followed by ‘God Save the Queen,’ by the Sex Pistols.   A ‘mosh pit,’ would be in the middle of the room and those brave enough and whose knees still worked, would try to launch themselves off of the leg rests of their geriatric recliners, shouting ‘Up the revolution.’ 

Outside,  Para-medics would be busy loading exhausted ‘Generation Zimmer,’ into their ambulances. For a change they are not being abused and sworn at – shouts of ‘peace and love’ would fill the air with offers to share a spliff – for medicinal purpose of course.  

Now there’s a thought.

Rock on.

Advertisements

From → Blog

69 Comments
  1. Wonderful column, Jane. Loved it. I’m one of those boys who doesn’t dance. But I plan on being a guest competitor on “So You Think You Can Hobble?”. LOL. Besides, by the time big business has finished poisoning the atmosphere and raising the levels of the oceans through Global Warming, the only life forms left on the planet will be cockroaches and Keith Richard.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am so glad you enjoyed it Jeff and that you ‘got’ it. I did think of Keith Richards staggering around with his frame, getting his fix and a fag (not that type of fag!) and raising a glass or two as the carers ask to change his nappy (diaper). Several others would be stretchered away following on from musical events where stage diving and moshing was a bit too much. Oh deep joy…what do we have to look forward to eh? 🙂

      Like

  2. Loved “dancing around our Zimmer frames”. Our era of 60’s, 70’s and early 80’s music was without doubt the best and in your writings memories came flooding back. Woodstock, Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell, to name a few, beautiful words to wonderful songs. Forward onto Motown who can forget the tunes, dancing into a disco head bopping, hands rolling to Freda Payne and Band of Gold and Smokeys Tears of a Clown. Next Roxy with the smooth Ferry. I hope my Zimmer frame is gold to match my gold and flashing purple and pink teeny boppers, my slippers will be flashing to match my boppers…. no tartan slipper or blanket for me…..did I forget to say….my Zimmer frame will be wired for sound…..bring it on. Well scripted cousin x

    Liked by 1 person

    • LOL Sue, we will be the old rockers moshing as they try and medicate us and shove a bed pan under us. We’ll be Groovin’ on a Sunday afternoon, we’ll still be Dedicated followers of fashion. We’ll be Talking about our Generation – all the way to the crem LOL Glad you liked it. Thanks for dropping in, do it again. It is fun having you. Love to you too cousin xxx

      Like

  3. Undeniably consider that which you said. Your favourite reason appeared to be on the web the simplest factor to take into account of. I say to you, I definitely get irked whilst other people think about worries that they just don’t recognize about. You controlled to hit the nail upon the top and also defined out the whole thing without having side-effects , people could take a signal. Will likely be again to get more. Thanks

    Liked by 1 person

    • Many thanks for your visit and comments on Dancing Around Our Zimmer Frames. I hope you enjoyed it. I know many people have. do visit again, really happy to meeet you here. 🙂

      Like

  4. What a fun and thorough history of dance–and us. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am glad you enjoyed it. Dancing is such fun and I just wish I could go dancing now. Thanks for your visit. 🙂

      Like

    • I am glad you enjoyed it. Could have added so much more to it actually. Thanks for your comment.

      Like

    • I know Joy, I am quite worn out…still, it is good for a giggle and a walk down memory lane – or is that a flounce?

      Like

  5. Alison permalink

    I definitely think each generation is younger than the previous one. I know my parents only listened to classical and jazz and Radio 4, and hated my “weird” pop music …. yet I go to gigs and music festival with my kids, and my daughter knows nearly as many 80s songs as I do!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Alison, thanks for your visit and comments. I know what you mean, my parents hated anything to do with ‘op,’ music and the long-haired great unwashed. Yet our son was and is into the same music we liked and like and he used to play our albums all the time, go to gigs the bands we liked performed and worked with us in music for a while too. It is lovely to share similar likes and you can hardly shout ‘turn that damn racket off,’ if you’ve been dancing around the hoover to it. Nice to have you here, do come again and we can chat about kids and music and stuff. 🙂

      Like

  6. Gosh, this brought back some memories! I can remember being at functions with my parents and cringing when they ‘shook their booty’s’ to disco music. Lol.
    A very though-provoking post this – I think I’ll be dancing around my zimmer frame to U2, Journey, Muse, Queen and Evanescence! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Carlie, glad you popped in and left a comment. I think we all have favourite tracks and dances which bring back such vivid memories of our youth. You may be interested to know that when making a record it was uppermost in our ambitions to try to make something which would appeal to the widest audiences and be a classic in some way or other, and in production and arrangements we strived to achieve this. Everyone wanted to make a recording which would have ‘legs.’

      Like

    • Hi Jane,This is a great blog, it brought back memories of my youth in Chicago.
      We were like “Teddy Boys” with our leather jackets and collars pulled up.
      We swaggered a lot, pretending to be very tough!
      We grew long sideburns like Elvis and wore fancy shirts.
      I remember walking down the street with my buddies singing, “Heartbreak Hotel”!
      I still have all my old Elvis 45’s, some are probably valuable.
      Thanks for the memories, Jane!
      Your Friend,
      Writer Dave

      Liked by 1 person

      • Glad you enjoyed it Dave. It seems to have rung a few bells with many on here and caused some laughs. The comments left have made me giggle too. Nice to see you here – as you will find, there are lots of things to read and look at.

        Like

  7. I used to work in an assisted-living facility, and when the old folks rolled off to Sing-a-long, it would make me wonder: when we get to that age, what will that be like? I can imagine the message over the PA system: “Mosh pit in the dining room at 7pm, followed by communal massage and painkillers”.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Kathy, you made me laugh so much when I read this. I have visions of the ‘moshers,’ hobbling back or being wheeled in for therapy and medication. We are going to be such fun ‘old folk,’ I think! Thanks so much.

      Like

  8. Jane, I’ve awarded you the ‘Reality’ blog award. More details over on mine.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. vkaspruk permalink

    Yes. This is very interesting.

    http://vkaspruk.wordpress.com/

    Liked by 1 person

    • Glad you visited and liked the post. Do come back again and read some other posts and let me know what you think. Have a lovely day. x

      Like

  10. What a lovely post (and also the comments). The country dancing took me right back to primary school and hoping I’d get to Strip The Willow with Barry Thomas.
    All the music you mention is part of my own youth. In early teens we used to go to dances, particularly when local (SW London) group The Others were playing. The did lots of R&B (old-skool sense, not what kids mean by it now) and were brilliant and, amazingly, have recently reformed and are still playing – looking and sounding great.
    Alvin Lee is a sad loss. He was a client of my husband (who is a music mastering engineer) and came to our house a few times. I’d say that last time I saw him he looked..er.. well-worn but unmistakeably rock n’roll, always. RIP.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Judy, Rock and Roll can be the death of you! Glad you enjoyed the post and the comments, such fun to read what everyone got up to back then. I am trying to think if I have heard of The Others. About when were they gigging in London? I have to say that Mastering Engineers are the unsung heroes of Recording. The guys we worked with over the years were magic. I am thinking of Big Bass Brian over at Bernie Grundman’s in Los Angeles for example. He is an amazing ‘artiste,’ when it comes to Mastering. They get so little recognition except amongst those who are into the technical side of making a record. How wonderful to have worked with Alvin Lee. I am so sad to read of these wonderful and talented people leaving us. Ours was THE era, of that I am sure. Great chatting to you here and I hope you pop back and exchange a few more gems with me. RIP all those wonderful musicians, songwriters, and creative beings who have made our lives so enriched and colourful. xx

      Like

  11. Fabulous post, Jane! I suspect you have to be a baby boomer to fully appreciate it – we’re all still grooving along to ‘All Along the Watchtower.’

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, I think that most of my followers most likely are!! Thanks so much for commenting June, appreciated. Yep, ‘All Along the Watchtower,’ – amazing track. Glad you popped in and enjoyed the post. Do pop back soon and perhaps have a wander around and a read of some other posts and so on – you can find them under Tasters, Blog and About. You might relate to Gas Lamps, Harry Randals to Sat Navs and ipads…..well, not your era I am sure, but it may well be your parent’s era and ring a few bells with you! Let me know if you do. Enjoy your day. xx

      Like

  12. Great post, Jane! I can just about remember country dancing at school. But the music in the 80s, when I was a teen, was a bit… well, I preferred Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd, so that was my excuse for not going to discos. I have a fairly diverse music taste, as my dad was into Nat King Cole and George Shearing so I grew up listening to that as well as loving the Friday Rock Show (remember Tommy Vance and the Friday night connection slot?); and I also used to love singing along in the car with my mum to Barry Manilow. My daughter likes very girly contemporary stuff (and she’s done me a great playlist for the gym – without any rap in it!), whereas my son’s tastes are more like mine and my husband’s. There are quite a few guitars and a piano in our house, and one of the best things about the school holidays is having a jam session with my daughter (and occasionally we can talk her brother into joining in, provided we’re playing something he likes).

    If music be the food of love… Oh, yeah. It certainly is 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Kate, thanks so much for commenting here. Appreciated. I too grew up with Cole and Shearing, Berlin and Gershwin as well as military marching band music! Married to a musician and working in the music business most of my life has had an impact too….Thrash metal to Pop/Dance and R&B and everything in between. Doris Day is one of my all time favourites, so I have very wide and varied tastes like you. I do remember Tommy Vance and his Friday Night Rock Show on Radio One. Several of my bands appeared on it and for the show we recorded the sessions at the BBC Maida Vale studios. So pleased you have had so many instruments in your home; so important. I am so glad you enjoyed this post. You may also enjoy (I hope), reading some of my others, especially Gas Lamps, Harry Randals to Sat Nav and iPads..let me know. And music is the food of love….xx

      Like

  13. Great post, Jane. Brought lots of smiles to my face, thinking of my mum and her love of music. She introduced me to the music of Paloma Faith and Lily Allen. She would suggest songs for me to sing in competitions.
    There was always music in Mum’s house – Bon Jovi, Cliff Richard, Tchaikovsky, John Denver…She passed comment on a few occasions that if she lived in a care home, the others would wonder who she was talking about. ‘I couldn’t discuss songs of Lily Allen with them like I can with you.’
    Mum’s purchase of The Streets CD caused a stir. ‘You do know there’s explicit language, don’t you?’ asked the shop assistant. Haha! Mum never swore, but it didn’t put her off.
    Her ‘exit’ song was Queen’s ‘Don’t Stop Me Now’.
    Music has the power to bring generations together. One of my pleasures in life is my children singing along, with me, to Paloma, or Amy, and then me reciprocating by learning One Direction and Olly Murs songs.
    Laura xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Laura, sounds like your Mum is a star. Mine is not into anything after Nat King Cole as far as I am aware. I do think we are going to rip it up in the Old Folk’s Home – if we are not put down before then! I love you share your music with your children. Our son grew up with our music and I am happy to see from his music collection, he still loves the same music as we do. My series God’s Waiting Room is all about the ‘older generation,’ and the characters and their lives in the village they grew up in (I meet similar characters at the bus stop often),…so when it is finished I am shall let you know. You may enjoy it. Thanks so much for commenting – love to see what people think and have them share their experiences. xx

      Like

  14. A thoughtful post, Jane. It made me think of a teaching colleague who said that when we’re all in nursing homes we’ll be sitting round in a circle, with no teeth, singing Jimi Hendrix songs instead of Vera Lynn. Ha Ha. can you just see a load of us dancing round our Zimmer frames to Serge Gainsboro and Jane Birkin !!

    Liked by 1 person

    • As long as none of the in-mates come over all ‘romantic,’ when Serge and Jane are singing all breathless!! Sparks flying off of colliding Zimmers!! Now there’s a thought. Not!

      Like

  15. I think we have enough in storage to sing and swing to quite a few… starting with the 50’s 60’s and 70’s (missing the 80’s of course!) and then there are the classics that we have no choose but to remember – in fact they may be the only songs we remember if the truth be stated here. 😀 Start Me Up babe

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Don’t worry about what they’ll play in the old people’s homes, the Stones will probably be in one still belting it out.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yep – fills you with horror. Still we shall be so gaga by then it won’t matter. As long as they keep the JD coming and the vino collapso I shall be happy. the odd bag of licorice and good books will keep me out of their hair.

      Like

  17. Great post. I enjoyed this nostalgic trip into the past – but am not thinking about the zimmer frame future!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Me neither Paula. But the thought is a scarey one. I think my generation is going to prove a bit of a handful for the ‘carers’. Mind you, I think I shall avoid going into somewhere with all my being, unless I am totally out of it and wouldn’t know anyway. Glad you enjoyed it Paula.

      Like

  18. oh, Jane this was simply delightful. reminds me how much i missed sitting out on the sidelines with my reserved self. loved this brief walk through music history, your history and the thought provoking question at the end. this post was magical for me. thank -you

    Liked by 1 person

    • Kelly, I am glad I made you smile. I was a bit of a shy one as well believe it or not. I am glad it was magical for you. Those were magical times for my generation. I have to say that I am not the tattooed lady with the face furnishings…..but I know some who are. xx

      Like

  19. Lisa permalink

    Wow, so beautifully descriptive, perfectly detailed, poignant of a magical time of youth, so vividly captured; a golden age of music~~dancing together to music that stirs our souls, nothing better. Wonderfully written, Jane, love it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Glad you enjoyed it Lisa and I hope I got your feet tapping. Nothing like the Gay Gordons to get the creative juices flowing! Next time to trip the light fantastic, think of me! x

      Like

  20. annieye permalink

    I was 13 in 1969, so entered my teenage years in the era of flower power, Woodstock and Motown. I have always hated dancing because of my clumsiness (later discovered I was cross-co-ordinated), but have always loved listening to music. My parents were quite ‘with it’, much to the tutting and shaking heads of my grandparents. They were both into Herb Alpert, and I used to quite like it too. My brother learned to play the trumpet and guitar at 13 and still plays in a band. Once I was 17, they even turned a blind eye to my boyfriend of nearly two years sharing my bedroom – so broad-minded were they, and my mum even came with me to the doctor’s when I wanted to go on the pill.

    My boyfriend was a ‘rocker’ in a black leather jacket with fringes on the arms and across the back. He rode a push-bike with monkey handlebars, was into Jimi Hendrix and had long black wavy hair, while I was a skinhead in loons and tie-died grandad-style t-shirts – well what else could I do when I had dreadful alopecia? We must have made a strange-looking pair. When we were aged 19, he became my husband, and still is, dispelling the myth that we were ‘far too young to get married’. Our music tastes merged into Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Pink Floyd, David Bowie and Kraftwerk – one very happy memory is of driving to the east coast in our clapped out red Morris 1100 listening to Kraftwerk’s ‘Trans-Europe Express’ and ‘Autobahn’ on our very new, smart car radio cassette player. I think we might have been married by then, as his parents allowed us to share a bedroom when we joined them on holiday. They would never have done that if we hadn’t been married. They were definitely not so with-it as my parents!

    We were still quite young ourselves when we had our kids, and so we enjoyed their music, especially Metallica, which we still listen to occasionally. Ibiza club music features on my I-phone, nicked from the CDs left behind by my daughter when she got married and left home ten years ago.

    Our children are our best friends, and we are theirs. We socialise with them and their friends, and other young parents of our era join us. I am glad my own children haven’t waited until they are in their 40s before having children of their own. I had young parents, we were young parents and they are young parents. Some of my friends are still coping with teenagers and a couple of them have 11 and 12 year olds, having had ‘second’ families, like the Queen, after getting divorced.

    The one thing I have never come to terms with though, are the excessive drinking habits of young people, and I used to worry about how much alcohol my own children drank. This is probably because I don’t drink, though, more than an age-gap thing, because my husband doesn’t think they drink too much. Well, he wouldn’t, would he? He is more than capable of keeping up with his sons!

    This is a great post, Jane, and has evoked some very happy memories for me. I can hardly believe Rob and I will be celebrating our Ruby Wedding Anniversary in two years’ time, so quickly have the years flown by.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Anne, glad you enjoyed this and the memories it evoked. I have had my Ruby anniversary (shh, don’t let on), and I am happy to say that in my head I am still 18 – the bodywork is not up to the punishment it got when flitting around like a butterfly at 18 mind you! I had a strict upbringing and holding hands was taboo…actually boyfriends were taboo, hence I left home as soon as I was old enough…alcohol was never an option and pubs etc were never even thought about. Such different lives eh!

      Like

  21. I’m a rubbish dancer but I will have a go when the lack of light is made up for with plenty of alcohol.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ah back then Patsy we didn’t do alcohol, we were far too young and Pub going was never even thought about, let along the booze. But I would need a few now to get up and shake my booty. You and I need to find a dark place, great music and lots of the Vino Collapso…..then we could dance all night. x

      Like

  22. Very well written, nostalgic and very atmospheric, I can see the people and locations very clearly as I read. I don’t know or remember some of those dance moves from the 60s you mentioned, me being born in a 1970 Dublin city, but it is all the same, same experiences just different times I suppose…enjoyed this Jane, thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Michael I am sure you had your own moves at school and later! I am glad you found it fun. Dublin would be different, but I am sure that grabbing girls too close was definitely frowned upon – our Nuns would not stand for anything ‘intimate’ like that!

      Like

  23. Hugh Palmer permalink

    Very descriptive Jane, and evocative. It’s so true about your parents trying to dance at a wedding, or whatever, and the children dying of embarrassment!
    Erm, I hope you don’t mind, I think ‘Edmundo Ros’ is just the one ‘s’, Phil Spector is with an ‘o’, and ‘Victor Silvester’ is with an ‘i’ and not a ‘y’. If that’s not the sort of thing you want pointed out, just tell me so and I’ll only comment generally!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hugh thanks so much, I thought I had checked, but perhaps I meant to and didn’t get round to it. The little grey cells you know! Not a problem at all, thanks. Do pop in and comment whenever you want. x

      Like

  24. Love ya, Jane! For me, it’ll be Europe, Bon Jovi, Dare, FM, Aerosmith, Creed, Muse, Kings of Leon, Heart… Well, you know what I like, LOL. Zimmerframe or not, I shall continue to rock, and so shall you. FABULOUS post, thank you! X

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’ve taken me way back, from the Gay Gordon’s & the Valetta taught by my father in the best room before school when I was very young. I can add Scottish dancing taught at one of the boarding schools, a class I loved – it was one class in which I excelled! To Kathy McCowan from the Wiremill in Lingfield, where we went most Saturday nights.

      I have a dread of Care homes full stop, tattooed women and piercings, sends shivers down my spine now, older thinner or stretched tattoos…argh…

      I know a couple of elderly ladies who go to tea dances…I am reliably informed that one reason they enjoy going is because it is the one time in their week they are held. There is a certain poignancy in that.

      Great post. Very entertaining.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Penelope, glad this entertained. I have a dread of those homes but I guess by the time I am eligible, they will be far too expensive and I quite expect to be ‘put down’ but the State. The way things are going….never mind, imagine the funeral! I am not pierced or tattooed at all just in case you wondered. My later Mother-in-law met her third very wealthy husband at tea dance….I may start going. Thanks for commenting. Appreciated. x

        Like

    • Ah well, the bands you mention came a long time after I left school and gave up tripping the light fantastic Nicky. I am a fan of those listed and they were always played….but when I was a teenager it was the 60’s and so very different in every way. Glad you liked the post though. x

      Like

  25. Wow Jane, how well I remember the Dashing White Sergeant and the Gay Gordons! We used to have dancing if it was too wet for PE. Looking back I guess dancing lessons were quite a good idea. We did the cha cha, the foxtrot, the tango and the waltz + the St Bernard’s waltz – can’t imagine secondary school girls doing this today! Sometimes the boys in our class who had separate PE lessons at the same time were press ganged into joining us. How they hated it! We were on occasions allowed to bring current singles along if they were deemed appropriate. I remember doing the tango to Billy Fury’s Jealousy! On rare occasions our games mistress relented and let us dance to something more modern – someone once brought in Chubby Checker’s Twist Again and there we were, gangly twelve year old girls twisting away! The good old days eh?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jo, I know about the PE and rain – we were made to do it in sub-zero temperatures and the cross-country! The mud and cuts and bruises! We learned the other dances you mentioned and it came in good stead when I had to dance with the Brigadier at the 25th anniversary of the British Army base workshops in Germany where I lived….all very formal and if I hadn’t been flung across the floor a few times by male classmates I would have looked a right twit! Not that I have danced them since or ever likely to. Fun days though.

      Like

      • Jane, PE was one thing but our games periods were a nightmare. The mistress, Mrs Hoare (very unfortunate name) used to make up a netball and hockey team and those left over had to go on a cross country run with the boys. I went to school at Bradford on Avon which meant running to the nearby hamlet of Avoncliffe along the canal bank and then back along the road into the town. We had to do without scarves or gloves (Mrs H was a real witch!). On the very cold days we used to hide in nearby Tithe Barn and then run panting back to school as if we’d run a marathon! but Unfortunately Mrs H discovered our hideout and soon had us out of there! We grew into a hardy breed of young women because of this!

        Liked by 1 person

        • We did cross country with the boys and went through the grounds of a public school and they had an Army Assault course there which we had to do part of too…we could not cheat as we had to note where we passed on trees (posters up) and so if you hadn’t put your initials then it was obvious you had not been. We had tee shirts and Gym skirts, ankle socks and plimsolls only and we did it whatever the weather. Even if snowing or raining we were out doing sports, PE, Tennis, Lacrosse you name it. I think PE teachers are a certain breed!! Then into the communal showers (girls) with the boys next door and their PE master who used to ‘pop’ in to collect the footballs which we in one of the lockers in our changing rooms…. or stopped by for a natter with the PE mistress…..all those girls wandering in and out of the showers in their towels!! Yep, we had him sussed.

          Like

  26. Jane, so funny! I have a terror of ending up in a nursing home where they are still singing the songs of my mother’s era. I like your picture a lot better. Thanks for the image.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Kay, thanks for popping and in having a visit. I have a dread of it too…I just cannot see myself sitting in those dreadful geriatric chairs, supping tea and nibbling rich tea biscuits or doing the ‘Lambeth Walk.’ AD/CD pounding out ‘A whole lot of Rosie,’ doesn’t quite seem right either does it? Our kids will visit and roll their eyes and look at their watches and think ‘bloody hell, if I have to listen to ‘A whole lotta love,’ once more I’ll scream!’ Rock on Kay, Rock on. x

      Like

  27. Jane – I just love the mental images of dancing you have here! Dancing is such an important part of a lot of cultures and it’s really woven into people’s memories. You’ve brought back some good ones, for which thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Glad you liked it Margot. It came to mind with the death of Alvin Lee and also one of the Miracles (founder member), and got me thinking about age. 68 is young, well it is to me as it creeps up…and I tried to imagine what Alvin looked like now. I could only recall him as a young man, if I hear the music of that era I cannot get my head round the fact that the musicians are old…like the Beatles and Stones, like The Who….I hear their music and I am 16 again, but of course the music does not age (though tastes change), but they do and we do. Dancing is important and all cultures have some form of it…singing too. Hope you get to dance soon. I have not danced in years…except in private all alone!!

      Like

Please leave a reply and comment - your input is really appreciated. Thanks, Jane

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: