Skip to content

Welcome to my author blog. I post about my writing, things I enjoy such as photography and life in general. Feel free to look around, comment and get involved. I love to hear from you and especially new visitors. Your visit is appreciated.

Virginia Water Lake in Windsor Great Park: another ‘jolly.’

Virginia Water Lake (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Virginia Water Lake (c) Jane Risdon 2015

I’ve been off on another ‘jolly.’  You know what that means; photos and blurb.

Somewhere I’ve always wanted to visit and enjoy.

Virginia Water Lake.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

The lake, not the small town, though I’d like to visit that when I get chance.

Apparently I visited there as a child but I cannot recall it, and anyway, even if I had been there as a child, I couldn’t have appreciated it the way I can, and have, as an adult.

Virginia Water Lake (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Virginia Water Lake (c) Jane Risdon 2015

For those without a clue where Virginia Water is, here is the blurb:

The town of Virginia Water is a commuter town in Surrey, England.  It might rings some bells if I mention The Wentworth Estate and The Wentworth Club, where the first Ryder Cup was played.

It is also home to the headquarters of the PGA European Tour (pro golf) and the estate was in the headlines in 1998  when General Augusto Pinochet was kept under house arrest in one of the properties there, prior to his extradition.

The estate is situated in the Borough of Runnymede; you know the place, where the Magna Carter was signed by King John.

The town takes its name from the lake in the nearby Windsor Great Park and the lake’s name was transferred from a previous stream which was probably named after the ‘Virgin Queen.’ Elizabeth l. 

The River Bourne provides water for the lake and it exits the lake at the eastern end after cascading down a waterfall.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

The bodies of water stretch over the boarders of Runnymede, Old Windsor, Sunninghill and Ascot. Think rich and famous and you’ll get the idea – the area oozes wealth.  Sir Elton John has lived in the area and author Bill Bryson spent his early married life in the village, to name but a couple of well-known names.

Windsor Great Park was once part of a vast Norman hunting forest. It was enclosed in the late 13th century.  It is the only Royal Park managed by The Crown Estate.

Covering 2,020 hectares of parkland, it includes a mix of formal avenues, gardens, woodland, open grassland and a Deer Park.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Great Park and its forest are renowned for its scattering of ancient oaks, which all add to the magnificent history of the Great Park.

Windsor Castle can be seen at the end of the long drive.  We all know who lives there: HM The Queen.

It is open to the public for walking, running, dog walking, cycling and rollerblading, fishing, flying model aircraft, horse riding and picnicking, plus so much more. 

Virginia Water Lake:

From Saxon times through to the present day, every century has left its mark on the landscape.  One of the most interesting areas to explore is the southern shore of Virginia Water Lake.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

The artificial lake was created in the 18th century under William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, the Ranger of the Park at the time. It was first dammed and flooded in 1753. Until the creation of the great reservoirs, it was the largest man-made body of water in the British Isles. Few details exist of the building of the lake but it has been suggested that prisoners of war from the Jacobite risings, who were encamped at nearby Breakheart Hill, were involved.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

Check for changes but The Valley Gardens and Virginia Water is open all year round from dusk until dawn,  entry fees apply, and there is a car park fee.  

There is a restaurant at the entrance. In 2013 the Virginia Water Pavilion, an impressive structure fabricated by sustainable timber supplies from the Windsor Forest,  was opened and offers improved visitor facilities to the area. As well as public conveniences (with baby changing and disabled facilities ) there’s a Visitor Services Team available to help and advise and also seating with stunning views across the lake and a place to take refuge if the weather turns bad.  There is seating outside also.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

Some trivia for you to digest:

The shores of the lake have been used for lakeside scenes in the Harry Potter films, and for boat scenes in Robin Hood. It seems that the Scottish alternative was unsuitable because of the number of midges.

The lake is also the site of the British Record capture of a Pike (fish) weighing 58lbs 5ozs.

During WW2 the lake was drained, as its recognisable shape was thought likely to provide enemy guidance at night to Windsor and to important military targets in the area.

No point in doing that these days; they can use Google Earth.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

Anyway, back to our walk around the lake.

The circuit  around the lake is about 4.5 miles (7.2Km) about half of which is paved and the other half is ‘natural’ path. Wheelchairs and pushchairs should manage it easily. 

Cascade Virginia Water Lake (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Cascade Virginia Water Lake (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The famous cascade, a short walk from the Virginia Water car park, next to a fab pub where they serve food, also dates from that time. There used to be an earlier cascade a little further east apparently, on a previous pond head, but it seems it collapsed.

We entered from the car park, resisted the pub – until later – and took off around the lake taking a left turn from the entrance.

A word of warning, wear good shoes, especially if it is wet underfoot.  The walk around the lake is easy but good shoes or boots make life worth living.

The landscape design was developed further during the reign of George lll. It was Thomas Sandby, the renowned topographical draughtsman, who was responsible for most of it.

Leptis Magna Virginia Water Lake (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Leptis Magna Virginia Water Lake (c) Jane Risdon 2015

In 1818, George lV installed the Leptis Magna ruins.  Which is the next place of interest we stopped at, having spent a few minutes watching the cascade not too far from our entry point.

Leptis Magna ruins – a Roman Temple – built from columns and lintels brought from the ancient city of Leptis Magna, in the early 19th century.

Interesting, but a bit of a puzzle. Why you ask?  Sorry, no reason that I can think of except for the passion back then for all things ancient and classical, and the fact that many rich noblemen took the ‘Grand Tour,’ of Europe and had to bring back a few souvenirs.  

Leptis Magna Virginia Water Lake (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Leptis Magna Virginia Water Lake (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Think Butlins holidays and ‘Kiss me Quick,’ hats from the 1950s and 1960s, postcards and silly ornaments with the name of the seaside resort printed on them.  I guess, in the 19th century, bringing a Leptis Magna home was something to remember the trip by.

Just saying.

Following the lake (on the right of us) we found the site of the Chinese fishing temple.…well where it once was; we think. It’s one of the most elaborate adornments to the lake’s shore apparently.  A Mandarin yacht, known as a Chinese junk, plied the waters, adding to the exotic effect so we were told by a notice.  I have no idea what I was supposed to be looking at, but the yacht had definitely sailed. Typical.

Good paths (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Good paths (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Later on in the 1930s  and 1940s The Savill Garden and Valley Gardens were established, continuing the grand landscaping traditions.  I seem to recall a trip out to Savill Gardens, one Sunday afternoon, some years ago, with my mother and one of my numerous siblings, when we had a fab pub lunch (we always end up in a watering hole) and a very long and delightful walk around the gardens.  

We didn’t enter from the Virginia Water end of the estate, but somewhere else and so missed seeing the lake on that occasion.   The gardens are well worth a visit, especially in the Spring and Summer, but actually there is something to see all year round.  It’s that sort of place.

Stunningly beautiful and so very peaceful. It’s food for the soul.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

Virginia Water is a must in Autumn.  The trees were magnificent in their golden splendour, though some were yet to change.  So wonderful in fact, that my phone camera couldn’t cope with the sheer brilliance of the colour contrasts.  We hadn’t planned on a trip to Virginia Waters, so I didn’t think to bring my proper camera, and I am so upset that many photos didn’t come out clearly.  Still, my brother had his iPhone and that seemed to cope brilliantly.

We came across few people on our 2 hour walk, although judging from the car park, there were dozens of people visiting.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

We had the lake and woodland paths to ourselves and the sun shone right up until the last 15 minutes of our walk, when it tried to drizzle, but  it gave up and the evening sky started to come in.

Sun going down (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sun going down (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Totem Pole (C) Jane Risdon 2015

Totem Pole (C) Jane Risdon 2015

I was so excited that we managed to find the Totem Pole which I’d heard so much about as a youngster.  It is 100 feet high, and was a gift to HM The Queen from the Government of British Columbia, Canada. It didn’t disappoint.

From the People of British Columbia Canada - gifted to HM The Queen (c) Jane Risdon 2015

From the People of British Columbia Canada – gifted to HM The Queen (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The woodlands surrounding the lake have been continuously planted since the middle of the 18th century. The Frost Farm Plantation at the south-western end of the lake) is also a designated SSI (Site of Special Interest) because of the maturity and biodiversity of the area.

Well, apart from raving about the beauty of the scenery, the tranquility and sense of open space, there’s not much more to say.  I think I’ll allow the photos to tell the rest of the story. After an approximate 8 mile and 2 hour walk, we headed to the pub by the entrance for a well deserved vino collapso.  Luckily we’d eaten at a lovely restaurant on the way there, so there wasn’t any need to have dinner.   

I slept like a log that night.  All the fresh air and exercise knocked me for six.

If you get the chance, especially if you find yourself visiting Windsor Great Park, do make a point of seeing The Savill Gardens, The Valley Gardens and the magnificent

Virginia Water Lake.  

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

You won’t be disappointed.

The Crown Estate Windsor Great Park Tel: +44 (0)1753 860222


I hope you have enjoyed my trip around the lake – do let me know.

All photos (c) Jane Risdon 2015 All Rights Reserved.


Grab a Coffee: Jenny Kane is my Guest Author Today.

coffe mug and beans Public Domain

Pull up a chair, grab a coffee or a nice strong cuppa, and meet author Jenny Kane who is my Guest Author today.

Jenny Kane photo for blog Nov 2015

As you know, I don’t host authors that often, but now and again I indulge myself and today I am happy to welcome Jenny Kane – who happens to share the same publisher with me: Accent Press.

Jenny was kind enough to host me on her blog, The Perfect Blend: Coffee and Kane on  13th April 2015

and I am happy to reciprocate here.

Jenny Kane is the author of the contemporary romance Christmas at the Castle (Accent Press, 2015)

The bestselling novel Abi’s House (Accent Press, 2015)

The modern/medieval time slip novel Romancing Robin Hood (Accent Press, 2014)

The bestselling novel Another Cup of Coffee (Accent Press, 2013),

and its novella length sequels Another Cup of Christmas (Accent Press, 2013),

and Christmas in the Cotswolds (Accent, 2014).

Her fourth full length romance novel, Another Glass of Champagne, will be published in 2016.

Jenny is also the author of quirky children’s picture books:

 There’s a Cow in the Flat (Hushpuppy, 2014)

and Ben’s Biscuit Tin (Coming soon from Hushpuppy)

Jenny says:

One of the most important decisions I make when I’m about to write a story is where to locate the tale.

Last Christmas, I wrote Christmas in the Cotswolds, and thoroughly enjoyed taking Pickwicks’ waitress, Megan, away from her workplace in Richmond, on an artistic adventure in the lovely Gloucestershire countryside.

This year, Christmas at the Castle, the fourth adventure for the characters from Pickwicks Coffee House take regular customer, and writer in resident, Kit Lambert, to a literary festival in the beautiful Scottish village of Banchory, North East of Aberdeenshire.

Christmas at the Castle: Kit’s Scottish Adventure

Christmas at the Castle Jenny Kene Blog interview Nov 2015

Christmas at the Castle is a seasonal treat from Jenny Kane, featuring much-loved characters from her bestselling novel Another Cup of Coffee.

A taster to enjoy with your coffee:

When hotshot businesswoman Alice Warren is asked to organise a literary festival at beautiful Crathes Castle in Scotland, her ‘work mode’ persona means she can’t say no – even though the person asking is her ex, Cameron Hunter.

Alice broke Cameron’s heart and feels she owes him one – but her best friend Charlie isn’t going to like it. Charlie – aka famous author Erin Spence – is happy to help Alice with the festival…until she finds out that Cameron’s involved! Charlie suffered a bad case of unrequited love for Cameron, and she can’t bear the thought of seeing him again.

Caught between her own insecurities and loyalty to her friend, Charlie gets fellow author Kit Lambert to take her place. Agreeing to leave her London comfort zone – and her favourite corner in Pickwicks Café – Kit steps in. She quickly finds herself not just helping out, but hosting a major literary event, while also trying to play fairy godmother – a task which quickly gets very complicated indeed…


Jenny adds:

I only ever write stories based in places I know well.

The Deeside area of NE Scotland, where Christmas at the Castle is based, was my home for a few years at the turn of the century.

I lived in the village of Banchory and worked in the branch of WHSmith’s you can see on the High Street.

While I was there, I was a frequent visitor to all the local castles, including the breathtakingly stunning Crathes Castle, which is the location of the story.

From the first moment I ever set foot onto the grounds back in 1998, I was in love with the place.

Jenny Kane blog interview Nov 2015

Owned by the National Trust for Scotland, Crathes Castle, was originally built by the Burnett family, and with its thick whitewashed walls, incredible wall and ceiling paintings, and atmospheric rooms, remains one of my favourite buildings in the world.

Complimented by a mix of formal grounds and woodland, no matter I write about Crathes,

I will never be enough to do it justice.

Crathes is as much a character in this festive novella as Kit, and her fellow literary festival planners, Alice and Charlie, Crathes is, throughout my book at least, under the careful management of the handsome Mr Cameron Hunter…

Here’s an extract for you to enjoy:

Cameron Hunter rocked back on his desk chair and stared out across the estate grounds of Crathes Castle.

From where he sat he could see the sweep of the formal gardens that huddled neatly around the foot of the sixteenth-century tower house, and on to the woodland beyond.

He still couldn’t believe he’d managed to land a job in one of the most picturesque places in the country.

On crisp winter mornings like this one, when the fallen russet leaves crunched underfoot and the evergreen leaves shone with the spidery touch of Jack Frost, it seemed madness that he’d actually hesitated before applying for the estate manager’s post.

Returning to the pile of paperwork on his desk, Cameron’s gaze fell on a stack of ‘Christmas at the Castle Literary Festival’ flyers.

It had seemed like such a good idea at the time.

The chance to impress his new boss and attempt a “kill or cure” technique on the ghost of his former relationship at the same time.

Cameron often wished he’d never set eyes on Alice Warren.

He hated that he couldn’t stop loving her, even when she made it clear that their time together had just been a bit of a fling.

He thought he’d be safe taking a job back in the area now that Alice was living in Edinburgh.

Yet on his very first trip into Banchory after taking the job, he’d seen her chatting to another girl outside the newsagents.

On his return to the office, unable to stop himself, he’d found himself searching for Alice Warren on Google.

Telling himself that this wasn’t stalking, but that he was merely acting in self-preservation, Cameron had discovered that his ex was running Warren Premier Events, a successful event management business in Edinburgh.

Seconds later, he’d come up with the idea to get her to organise an event for him.

That way his lingering obsession with her would either be shot stone dead and he could get on with his life, or Alice would realise she’d made a terrible mistake and that she loved him after all.

Pushing the sleeves of his thick Aran jumper past his elbows in annoyance at himself, Cameron absent-mindedly signed three documents.

Even though he knew he was behaving like a lovesick teenager, he couldn’t help but hope it would all work out.

Contacting Alice via the Warren Premier Events website, Cameron had asked her to help for old time’s sake.

Trying not to feel pathetic, he justified his actions to himself with the thought that, whatever his reasons, there could be few better places for a literary festival than in a castle at Christmas time…


Although this is the fourth book in the Another Cup of series,

Christmas at the Castle can be read as a standalone story.

If that mini extract has whetted your appetite, you can buy Christmas at the Castle from:

Many thanks Jenny for sharing your work with us.  

I wish you much success for your latest and future books.  

Keep your eye on Jenny’s blog at for more details.

Twitter- @JennyKaneAuthor

Facebook -

Jenny also writes erotica as Kay Jaybee

Many thanks Jane, 

Jenny xx


1NHnnocdwao tea cups Public Domain

Please let Jenny (and me) know what you think.  Comments are always welcome and it’s fun to make contact with you here.

Many thanks for your visit – do pop in again. 

Blast from the past: Short story from 2013 – Under Cover

In 2013 I wrote this Short story for publication on Morgen Bailey’s Writing Blog.  It was also Pod-cast by her soon after.

It was well received and encouraged by this I thought I’d eventually turn it into a longer story, perhaps even a book.  But then other stories took precedence, especially the divine Ms Birdsong Investigates and projects for my publisher, Accent Press, so the story was pushed to the back of my mind, and there it might have remained, had I not been reminded of it recently.

 It came to me in the middle of the night when, for no apparent reason, I sat bolt upright in bed wide awake.

Something woke me, my subconscious I suppose, working away on my stories , and in only a few seconds it dawned on me; this piece fitted right into another story I’ve been working on –  I should incorporate the two stories.

So I have, and they work brilliantly together, but I’m not giving anything away here; it’s a work in progress for some other time.

But I thought it would be fun to post the cause of all my excitement – the 495 word  story – once more. So here it is:

handcuffs_03_hd_picture_166679 (1)

Under Cover

For the last three years she had lived another life, had buried her real self, taking on the mantle of a hardened Madam, a trafficker of girls, the worst kind of criminal and, for the umpteenth time, she had fought nausea as she negotiated with the Eastern European.

Her control back at the command had shown concern the last time they’d met.  He could see the physical and mental toll this assignment was having on her, but they were committed now; there was no going back.  The team had spent too long infiltrating the organisation and she was their only hope.  During the time she had been under cover she had alerted them to more shipments of girls than he cared to recall, and the risk had grown with her every betrayal.

She knew it was only a matter of time before they rumbled her and her life wouldn’t be worth a fig if the team were unable to protect her and extradite her, at exactly the right moment.  The latest shipment had arrived at Heathrow only hours before and were already on their way to a secret location in London where there would be an auction of the girls, some as young as eight, and where the special unit of police would be waiting to raid them.  Her message had been received and the team was ready for any trouble which might ensue.

Marko eyed her from the bed as she gathered her clothes and prepared to shower and dress.  He didn’t trust her anymore, she seemed nervous and remote these days and his gut didn’t feel right; she didn’t feel right.  For a long time he’d had suspicions. She seemed to be softening towards the girls under her control and he was debating whether to remove her from her role as Madam of the main whorehouse, which she’d run so successfully.  Too many things had been going wrong lately.  Too many shipments had been discovered and although he had managed to remain more or less anonymous and untouchable, he knew his luck would run out unless he acted soon.  Was it her?  He hoped it wasn’t but he would soon know; the trap was set.  If the latest consignment of girls was discovered, and raided, he would know.

She lingered in the bathroom, fully dressed, senses heightened.  Marko had been a bit distant and had appeared suspicious of her movements all week.  He seemed to make a point of repeating the instructions for the latest intake of girls – where they would be, even giving her more detail than usual about on-line bidders.  Something wasn’t right.  She needed to contact control.  Marko’s kiss goodbye seemed final somehow.

As she pulled the door gently towards her, the phone rang.  She hesitated, listening to the conversation, her ear against the door; terror gripped her as she heard his words.  As she turned a strong pair of arms grabbed her and she screamed.


Have you ever done the same thing? Written two completely separate stories and something makes you link them together and when you do, they work like magic. 

Our subconscious minds are amazing organs.

In The Chair 50

Jane Risdon:

Thanks to Jan Ruth for interviewing me in The Chair this week. Who would I invite to a dinner party? What would we eat? Which of my characters would I like to be? There are castles, celebrities and champers….hope you enjoy this. I did.

Originally posted on janruthblog:

Welcome, Jane Risdon

How would you describe your writing style in only three words?

Jane:  Fast-paced, twisty, realistic.

11102784_844407928976852_7866671121152746412_nIf you could have a relationship with one of your fictional characters who would it be and why?

Jane: This is a hard one. Most of my characters are criminals and I am not gay, so having a relationship with the divine Ms B (Birdsong) is a no-go area. Having given it a lot of thought, I think I might well go for Ms Birdsong Investigates and her ex-lover and ex-MI6 partner, Michael Dante. He and she have had a long relationship which was rocky to begin when he was first seconded to MI5 for a series of operations, however, it quickly developed into a passionate and mutually respectful partnership, which ended violently when Ms B was ‘voluntarily’ retired from The Service when an operation they were involved in, went belly-up. She ended…

View original 1,056 more words

West Green House and Garden: Hangman Hawley, Shenanigans with the Housekeeper, and IRA Bombs – life on a country estate.

West Green House and Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green House and Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

I know I am in danger of becoming a visitor attraction blogger, but I am not – honestly!

It’s just that when given the opportunity to visit some of the most gorgeous cathedrals,  castles, villages, houses and gardens, we have in England, I feel it my duty to share what I see with all of you.  It would be so mean not to.

Recently I was given another little treat out and this time to a gem of a place I never knew existed:

West Green House and Garden.

West Green House and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green House and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The 18th century house and gardens sit in a quiet corner of Hampshire – the epitome of a small English manor house – surrounded by farmland. The whole estate covers 10 acres I believe.

Country Life described it as “embowered in trees, with quiet old world gardens spreading around it. This charming building seems the perfect embodiment of tranquil contentment and serenity of spirit, yet there hovers over it the unquiet ghost…”.

To get there is a joy in itself.  

Driving down leafy narrow country lanes, passing huge well established houses set back from the road, with long winding driveways, nestling within their own landscaped grounds.  The area exudes money and establishment.  But I loved it.

West Green Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

I loved the fields with grazing horses, the dappled sunshine hitting the road through the leafy canopy of ancient trees and hedgerows, and the silence – apart from birds complaining loudly, as they streaked from their hiding places above our heads, as the car wound its way cautiously along lanes still abundant in summer flowering weeds and foliage.

The air was fresh but with underlying scents and fragrances only the countryside can yield. 

We drove into a large field next to the grand house, set aside as a car park for visitors.  

Green houses could be seen across from us, visible through a row of several varieties of apple tree, groaning with fruit to our left.  

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

We were later informed it is a bumper year for English apples: the weather and all that.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

I should mention that The Mater was with us on this particular trip, designed to be easy for her to manage, with plenty of places to sit and rest her 85-year-old legs if necessary.  There was also a lovely little tea room with tables outside, for when she wanted her coffee fix.

West Green apples (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green apples (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sadly for her and luckily for us, there weren’t any Edinburgh Wool Shops for her to peruse – but let’s no go there!

Back to the fun part.

During the past 100 years West Green has undergone four periods of transformation apparently.

West Green House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

It was built by General Henry Hawley who is often described as ‘Hangman Hawley’ after the ghastly brutalities he perpetrated in the 1745 Rebellion, particularly at Culloden.  

Scottish readers might not want to dwell on this when thinking about visiting the house.

Cute Restrooms (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Cute Restrooms (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Hawley was a bit of a lad I think.  He left his estate to his housekeeper’s second son, William Toovey Hawley, whose descendants lived at West Green until 1898;  seems the wages of sin might not be death after-all! I think we can all imagine what the general got up to.

Garden Rooms at West Green (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Garden Rooms at West Green (c) Jane Risdon 2015

At the beginning of the last century the Playfair family employed architect Robert Weir Schulz to remodel the north front of the house and design new gardens, but after 5 years the family left West Green and a new owner, Evelyn, Duchess of Wellington, continued to perfect the gardens.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Duchess, later with her cousin, Yvonne Fitzroy, lived and gardened at the house until 1939, largely through the generosity of Sir Victor Sassoon, who bought the house for the Duchess until her death in 1939 – why don’t I ever meet someone like that?

Anyway, Sir Victor left West Green to the National Trust (I adore the NT) in 1957, but it did not actually become Trust property until Miss Fitzroy died in 1971.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

The National Trust’s first tenant was Lord Alistair McAlpine (tar-mac roads come to mind), whose lasting contribution to the house and gardens is a collection of neo-classical ornaments designed by the architect, Quinlan Terry.

In 1990 the IRA (Irish Republican Army) detonated a bomb inside the forecourt, causing so much damage that the Trust considered demolishing the house.  I have no idea why the IRA wanted to bomb it.

Chinese Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Chinese Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Subsequently, Australian Marylyn Abbott, purchased the lease in 1993 and the National Trust relinquished  their financial and management commitment to the property for this period, and Ms Abbott began the painstaking task of rebuilding and making a new garden; so beginning a new era in the history of the house – restoring its ‘serenity of spirit’.

Bird CAge Island (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Bird Cage Island (c) Jane Risdon 2015

I thought the whole place was just magical.  The house wasn’t open to the public, though I understand you can book a private tour in advance. The gardens are so pretty, well designed, and easy to walk around.  We didn’t see everything, but we managed to get around most of the formal gardens which were delightful.

Each year flamboyant designs of fruit, flowers, herbs, and vegetables are planted in the last week of March, and great pride is taken to ensure the planting is never exactly the same, so the gentleman at the entrance, taking our money, informed us.

Vegetables and Plants together (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Vegetables and Plants together (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Apple and pear trees of all varieties have been planted everywhere.  Some climbing overhead, trained like roses upon arches, others close to the ground interwoven with seasonal planting.  Wigwams of sweet peas, stands of corn, sunflowers, pots of artichokes, arbours of peas, beans and nasturtiums add height to regimental lines of vegetables and flowers.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

 Always planted in shades of the same colour, it can be all red, or yellow, or orange, or perhaps it is a contrasting black and white year so we were told.

 Two vegetable patches are planted each season, sometimes one is planted as a story garden.

Near the entrance there are two brilliantly painted red dragons by Nick Muscamp, which rise out of dozens of spring-flowering black red paeonies supported by clipped cloud trees, framed by hornbeams.

Dragons (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Dragons (c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

Two tiled pagodas were the inspiration for this part of the garden that border the path to the lake field.

We passed a lake with a Chinese style bridge crossing over to an island where ducks, swans, and geese lazed around watching us, watching them.

Chinese Bridge to Bird Cage Island (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Chinese Bridge to Bird Cage Island (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The island is called Bird Cage Island; there is a large bird-cage there funnily enough.

All plants in this area are of Oriental origin and a small group of red toned Acer Palmatum complete this garden, making superb Autumn colour, we were told.

Acers (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Acers (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The lakes reclamation and its follies had been the largest undertaking in the restoration of the gardens. Choked with weeds, leaking, its surrounds thick with brambles, the lake had become a swamp and was remade in 1990.

 Nearby there was an obelisk – a monument to a Gardner working there some 40 years.

Monument to a gardener (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Monument to a gardener (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The lake field contains the architect Quinlan Terry’s most notable collection of small designs: a Doris Temple, a Grotto, to control the lakes overflow, a stylised cage for pheasants with a bronze roof, topped with a large Pineapple which, in Victorian times, was a symbol of wealth.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Arcadian lake field is entered to the east guarded by Chinoiserie pagodas and from the Walled Garden through old iron gates that open on to an ornamental pond, said to have been a medieval stew pond. 

Paradise Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Paradise Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Walled Garden is entered through a frame of old Wisteria Senensis, opening on to a design that forms two patterns.  There is a feeling of mystery and age captured by the planting and design here.

Parterres in the traditional French manner – tightly clipped box hedges forming hearts and ovals – decorated by topiary balls, cones, and pom poms, are simple and striking to see.  In one walled garden a chequer board parterre is the centre-piece for an ‘Alice’ garden filled with flowers from the story, in red and white.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

There is a Paradise courtyard inspired by traditional Islamic gardens, planted by Marylyn Abbott in 2004, with a simple design of water, trees, and grass framed by the white trunks of Betula Utilis var Jacquemonti.  The trees in the island are Malus ‘Evereste’ that appear to be growing from small pots, but are in fact rooted in the earth.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

There are several water gardens and the grandest is the Nymphaem, whose focal point is a wall designed by Quinlan Terry, modelled on the fountain of Santa Maria della Scala in the Via Garibaldi in Rome.

Two benches decorate the garden, specially commissioned white benches, designed by Jill Facer and Malcom Last, in 1999.

There is a garden with 5 bridges planted with blue and white Clematis and Wisteria and Japanese Cherry trees.

Open fields and rolling countryside is visible from various places in the garden, all adding to the beauty and simplicity of the gardens and house location.

The house can be glimpsed through iron gates with piers crowned with stone lions.  It is square in a colonnaded courtyard.  There are busts of gods, emperors and dukes looking down from niches in the house’s facade.  I loved the house.  It was perfectly formed and situated to my liking. 

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

In late July and early August West Green House hosts weekends of Opera in the Green Theatre. Set outside at night it has been described by Opera Critic, Michael White, as “Stylish, sassy; West Green House is one of the most charming new arrivals on the country house opera circuit, and one of the most promising. It dares to do what others don’t and does it with panache.”

There is a beautiful architect designed theatre, imaginative programming, and a ‘second’ performance of lights illuminating the garden, making West Green House Opera a unique occasion. We were informed.  My brother and I would love to try it next year and if we do, I’ll let you know all about it.

You can book and find out about programmes:  Tel: + 44 (0)1252 845582

On the way in and out of the gardens you pass through the inevitable Gift Shop, and I must say there were some lovely items for sale including a huge copper bath (distressed) on claw feet, and two amazing long narrow doors which I am sure an interior designer night love.  I’m not sure if they’d love the prices tags, but if you can afford it, the price never matters apparently.

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

(c) Jane Risdon 2015

We had a quick wander through several green houses and conservatories, which were lovely to see, all designer lay-outs and expensive furniture,  and each had grape vines laden with fruit dripping from the roofs, proving too much of a temptation for someone who shall remain anonymous (don’t look at me), as did the apple trees on the way back to the car.  I gather a ‘certain someone’ was going to be having baked apples for desert the following day.

West Green House and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green House and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Gift Shop (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Gift Shop (c) Jane Risdon 2015

On the way home we stopped off for lunch at a 16th century pub called The Leather Bottle, which has really changed little since it was built, even though there had been a fire some 50 years ago, so I am reliably informed by the family Oracle with whom we never argue, mainly because we never win!

The Leather Bottle (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Leather Bottle (c) Jane Risdon 2015

You might be interested to know that the pub began life as three cottages.

The name Leather Bottle was often associated with pubs which dated before the time of glass bottles.  Leather bottles were hung outside such places to advertise they would provide refills for ale and wine there.

The pub eventually became the White Inn (1714).  Though it was also known as The Leather at various times in its history.

At the time Queen Anne died the area was becoming busy with coaches on their way from Reading to Southampton, and a toll road was in use.  The area was notorious for robbers and highwaymen – especially on the route from Basingstoke to Bagshot apparently, and William Davis (known as The Golden Farmer, because he only stole gold), used the pub until he was hanged at Tyburn in 1670.

Another to use the pub  was Colonel Blood – famous for attempting to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London, who gave himself the name Parson Blood at the time, in order to fool the Keeper of the Jewels.

He made sure he got to know the keeper of the jewels, Talbot Edwards, and used his nephew to chat the keeper’s daughter up and distract the keeper as he tried to steal them.  He failed and was caught.

The King (Charles 11) known for taking a liking to adventurous and outrageous folk, somehow decided to pardon Blood, and infuriated everyone by restoring the robber’s lands in Ireland, because his adventure amused him so much!  It is also thought that Colonel Blood may have agreed to spy for the king.

It seems crime does pay.

The Leather Bottle, Reading Road, Mattingly, Near Hook, Hampshire RG27 8JU

Tel: +44 (0)1189 326 371 

I do hope you have enjoyed my brief trip around West Green House and Gardens – not forgetting the Leather Bottle, which you might like to visit.  The food is excellent and not ‘pub grub,’ by any means.  The chef is excellent too, at least when we dropped in.

If you fancy visiting West Green, here are the details:

West Green House and Gardens, near Hartley Wintney, Hampshire, opens Easter to September on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays.  Just turn up after about 11am.   The parking is free, but if it has rained take your wellies as the car park is in a field and the area around the lake is grass, and possibly a little muddy.   There is ‘Pick your Own’ available, and I don’t mean helping yourself.  You pay for what you pick.

More Information: Tel: +44 (0)1252 845582

West Green House and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

West Green House and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Let me know if you ever find yourself visiting. I’d love to know what you think. I think it is an adorable place and would love to see much more of it at some point.  I took far too many photos – too many to share – but I hope those I have posted give you a flavour of the place.

All photographs (c) Jane Risdon 2015. All rights reserved.

UPDATE:  Since posting this I have been contacted by West Green (their lovely PR person)  and they have added my blog to their website.  Apparently Marylyn Abbott is thrilled with my piece and experiences there.

Here is their link – do visit as there is lots to see and experience there.

Another Jolly: Knole House – once home to Vita Sackville-West and a Palace for Thomas Cranmer, and Henry VIII

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

In my last blog I posted about my latest ‘Jolly,’ when I spent a few days with family members and was treated to a visit to the National Trust property Sissinghurst Castle Garden, former home of the poet, author, and famous gardener,Vita Sackville-West, and her husband  Howard Nicolson.

My next ‘jolly,’ with my sister and her husband, was to Knole House, which was, and still is, owned by the Sackville family.  Vita Sackville-West always felt resentful about not inheriting the house, which passed to a male heir. 

She loved the house with what she described as an ‘atavistic’ passion.  She said, ‘Sissinghurst and St Loup are my spiritual homes.’ She later wrote. ‘and of course Knole, which is denied me for ever, through “a technical fault over which we have no control”, as they say on the radio.’ The technical fault being her gender.

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole came to dominate the Sackville family life and led to bitter fights for control, creating a complex family tree of ownership. Through it all, the treasures remained on show in the house.  The house remained in the possession of the Sackvilles until 1946 when the National Trust took over.  The current generation of the Sackville family still lives in their own private apartments in the house.

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The size of Knole is overwhelming. It reached its present size by the early 1500s but was always too big for its inhabitants.  Each generation added to it, but its character remains the same. 

It is more like a small town than a house or a palace, which it was when owned by Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury.  Unfortunately for him Henry VIII liked it so much that he forced the Archbishop to give it to him in 1538.

Knole was built to impress, to make a statement about the wealth and influence of its owner, Cranmer.  It was a symbol of power. In 1603 Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset, took ownership of Knole. The Sackvilles were an aristocratic family who made the most of their royal connections and collection of royal treasures.

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The rooms contain rare fabrics and furnishings, many of which came from the royal palaces.  As Lord Chamberlain, Charles Sackville could take his pick from unwanted royal furnishings.  It was an accepted perk of the job. Designed as sumptuous apartments in the early 1600s, the showrooms have not been lived in for 300 years.  They became home of the prestigious collections and a reminder of the wealth and power held by the family.

Knole House renovations (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House renovations (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Visitors come from everywhere today to visit the showrooms at Knole, as they have for hundreds of years, keen to peep inside this fabulous house.  It was really busy when we arrived late morning, and extremely hot too.  Part of the house was undergoing conservation; scaffolding was covering one large section, which was shame as it got in the way of photos I’d have liked to have taken.  Conservation work is being done by the Heritage Lottery Fund – a 5 year programme to preserve Knole for future generations.

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Vita spent a very happy childhood there. In ‘Knole and the Sackvilles,’ (1922), she wrote that Knole ‘has a deep inward gaiety of some very old woman who has always been beautiful, who has had many lovers, and seen many generations come and go’.

‘It is above all an English home.  It has the tone of England; it melts into the green of the garden turf, into the tawnier green of the park beyond, into the blue of the pale English sky.’

As we approached the house, having driven up a long driveway to the car park, we could see deer roaming, quite tame, right up to the visitors. We decided to sit for a while with a cooling drink (cider) purchased from an on-site ‘cafe,’ as it was already scorching hot when we arrived in late morning.  

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

A cricket match was being played on the nearby field and people sat watching and enjoying picnics in the shade of huge trees.

There are 600 deer in the herd consisting of light coloured fallow deer, which were joined, in the 19th century, by darker, shorter, stockier, Japanese Sika Deer.

  Kent’s last medieval deer park is unusual because it’s enjoyed more than 5 centuries of continuous management for its deer herds. Until the early 20th century the hunting of deer was a hugely popular sport among the aristocracy. There were about 700 deer parks in England in the 16th century. Knole was the only one in Kent.

Knole House and Park () Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The park is also a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), best known for its insects.  Apparently there are small grassy mounds, around, built by colonies of Yellow Meadow ants.  A typical colony contains around 14,000 ants!  Thankfully we didn’t see any.

Knole House and Park (c) JaneRisdon 2015

Knole House and Park (c) JaneRisdon 2015

During the 16th and 17th centuries, timber from the park was sold to Chatham (shipyards).  During both World Wars areas of the park were used for military camps, but apart from the metalled roads built by the Army, and the bomb craters beside the golf-course, which commemorate Knole’s site astride ‘Bomb Alley’ between London and the Channel, there is little change.

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

 Before looking around the house, we decided to take a walk through some of the acres of parkland, woods, and open meadows, keeping an eye out for golf balls; walkers can cross the course in various places and caution is advised.

Did I say it was hot?  Understatement.  The sun was relentless and thankfully we were able to get some shade from the enormous trees on the estate.  I thought I’d melt.  

Knole Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

We walked miles across parkland, through shady dark woodland, and across vast open, wasteland with grass and sandy paths which we followed up hill and down dale.  We barely met a soul, even though the car park had been full when we set off.

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Eventually we made out way back, in a loop, to the house, and had some lunch and a much-needed rest, sitting under the temporary scaffolding and awnings erected as a make-shift cafe.  I supposed the original cafe might be where the conservation was taking place.

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

We entered the West Front of the house underneath a tower – the central gatehouse with 4 battlements – built by Henry VIII between 1543-1548, and into  a vast courtyard with lawn on either side of the main path, called Green Court, the largest of 7  courtyards at Knole.  Then we walked underneath another tower – originally the West Front – into the main courtyard (Stone Court) and then on into the Great Hall where, one year, my companions had attended a Christmas Choral event, which they tell me was magical.  Looking round the vast hall I could see how atmospheric it might be with Christmas decorations and lighting.

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

I cannot possibly describe the whole house in any great detail; there was so much, it is so vast. Taking photos was not allowed inside, either, so I was rather disappointed.  I can only suggest a visit or a look on the Internet to see much more than I am sharing here.

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

 I can say, however, how helpful and informative the staff were.  We were often joined by a NT volunteer, seeing our specific interest in a painting or piece of art, or the wonderful tapestries which were undergoing restoration in some of the rooms, who would step up and tell us more or answer our questions, with obvious delight in their subject and love for Knole house.

We had such a laugh when a little Indian boy of about 4 asked his father why all the chairs, lining the walls in one room, were so old and shabby. He asked why would anyone sit on them, and why didn’t they get them fixed or buy new ones?  He kept on, like kids do, asking why.  In the end his father took him to one of the volunteers who tried to explain about the age of the chairs, and that kings and queens had sat on them.  He was not convinced and told the lady that kings and queens should spend their money and buy new ones.  In his house the chairs were not old and damaged.

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

As with so many of the large houses and estates of England, death duties and taxes have led to the break up and sale of so many of these wonderful, historic assets.   Knole passed to the National Trust in 1946 after years of negotiation, with an endowment towards its upkeep.  The family retained possession of the park and many of the house’s contents, and were granted a 200 year lease on various private apartments within the house.

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

If you’d like to enjoy Knole house and the park, and all it has to offer, here are some links:

Tel: +44 ()) 1732 462100.

The National Trust takes care of over 300 historic houses, castles, chapels, monuments, and gardens, including where literary first editions of the classics can be found, and where Jane Austen and others lived and wrote. 

Plus hundreds of

Medieval fortresses, Public houses (pubs) that welcomed Charles Dickens, and views that have inspired our painters and poets.

742 miles of coastline including The Giants Causeway to the White Cliffs of Dover, and over 247,000 hectares of land; open plains, rolling hills and ancient woodlands, and landscapes captured by artists such as J.M.W. Turner and setting which feature in the books of Beatrix Potter and many others, where you can walk, ride, and stay and much more. 

Membership of the National Trust helps care for our special places –  forever, for everyone.

I had a fabulous day and would happily go back again to explore more of the house and park. Hopefully when the weather is much cooler.

It is possible to have a tour of the park on board a red double-decker bus and if I recall correctly, it only costs £2.50 per person

Photographs (c) Jane Risdon 2015: All Rights Reserved.

Knole House and Park (c) 2015

Knole House and Park (c) Jane Risdon 2015

A new Jolly: Sissinghurst Castle Garden – Vita Sackville-West, Virgina Woolf, and Violet Trefusis come to mind.

Sissinghurst Castle Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sissinghurst Castle Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Lucky me!  I got to enjoy another special treat with a trip to some gorgeous places recently.

Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

I am spoiled I know, but what’s the point of being a big sister if you can’t be indulged by the younger siblings now and again.

I have the BEST siblings going.

A few days away with one of them recently was a wonderful way to re-charge my batteries.

Deep in the countryside with views over a lush valley at one side of the cottage and in the distance, views to the sea on a clear day from the front.

The fields directly behind the cottage host a large herd of very inquisitive cows, who love to pop their heads over the fence when they spy anyone in the garden, and ‘moo’ their greetings whilst their heads turn this way and that, watching what’s going on with the humans.

Family garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Family garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The garden was full of colour still, shimmering in the heat of the day – we had two glorious days –  with the scent of Honeysuckle and Roses drifting on the air early mornings, and late evenings, mingled with the aroma of mown hay, and the sweet smell of the cattle.

The village itself is steeped in history and the buildings are of varying age, but there’s nothing ‘new,’ which I like.

The added bonus is that there are two ancient pubs there; one almost directly opposite, but noise isn’t a problem thankfully.

I spent a while there last year and posted lots of photos of our trips out to Wakehurst Place, Batemans (Rudyard Kipling’s home), Ightham Mote, and Begesbury National Pinetum – just to name a few of the places we visited.

If interested in photos and the history of where we went, go to blog on the menu above, and scroll back a while. There’s lots to see and read about.

My brother-in-law cooked the most amazing meals for me, and my sister and I went out each day visiting local places of interest and beauty.

We got to sample her home-made blackberry liqueur, eat home-grown tomatoes and vegetables, and one evening we lay on sunbeds under the stars at 12 midnight, watching shooting stars and satellites go over, trying to work out which stars we could see twinkling overhead.   All enjoyed with a little ‘something,’ to keep us warm.

Another evening we were joined by an old friend of theirs, whom I had met once before, and we sat in the garden eating a fabulous three course meal – courtesy of my brother-in-law – drinking Prosseco, and enjoying a good old natter, trying not to flinch as several bats circled us, and a mouse crept into my sister’s vegetable cage’s on a mission to nibble as much as it could whilst she was otherwise engaged.

Last year she was robbed blind by field mice and rabbits who regarded the garden to be their very own larder, much to my sister’s disgust; hence the vegetable cages.  But you know that where there’s a will, there’s a way… still, she had more than enough left to make various jams, gins, vodkas, and liqueurs  – the sloes, and blackberries, came from the lanes near-by.

Don’t you just love eating what you grow – or someone else grows – organically too.

We both enjoyed a wonderful day out at Sissinghurst Castle and Gardens,

created and made famous by the  poet, author, and gardener,

Vita Sackville-West, and her husband Harold Nicolson, diplomat and author.

Sissinghurst Castle and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sissinghurst Castle and Gardens (c) Jane Risdon 2015

When they first came to Sissinghurst Castle in 1930 they didn’t dream they were making something new or pioneering.  

‘It was part of  ‘our romantic Saxon, Roman, Tudor Kent,’ Howard wrote to his wife once.

In 1932 they set about creating the now world-famous garden at the heart of the estate.

Sissinghurst Castle Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sissinghurst Castle Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Vita’s long series of articles in the Observer from 1947 until 1961 subtly and even surreptitiously, without actually naming her home and gardens, advertised the garden to the wider world – she longed to put it on show.

Gardens at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Gardens at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

 She was enthusiastic when the BBC wanted to make a Sissinghurst documentary in the mid 1950s.

Gardens at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Gardens at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sissinghurst is more than a garden. It is a garden in the ruins of a great Elizabethan house, set in the middle of its own woods, streams, and farmland, with long views on all sides across the fields and meadows of the Kent countryside.  

It had once been a  pig farm as well as a medieval manor house with a moat.  

The Moat at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Moat at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The family who lived in the small manor house at that time shared their name with the place; the de Saxingherstes.  

Nothing remains today of the original house except for part of the moat.

Whte Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

White Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The 16th century prodigy house had been visited by both Mary and Elizabeth, England’s great Renaissance queens, before falling into ruins and being neglected for 300 years.

View from the Tower at Sissinghurst of South Cottage and rose garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

View from the Tower at Sissinghurst of South cottage and rose garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Queen herself (Elizabeth 1) was persuaded to visit for three days in August 1573. Richard Baker, to be knighted a few days later, presented his queen with a silver-gilt cup on whose crystal lid a lion held forth in the royal coat of arms.

There was hunting in the park and revels by night.  The house was the hero, ‘by day time, on every side so glittering by glass; by nights, by continual brightness of candle, fire, and torch-light, transparent through the light-some windows…’

The Tower at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Tower at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Many times when Vita wrote of Sissinghurst, the atmosphere she summoned was of that embedded history, a certain rich slowness, even a druggedness, as if evening, when colours are soft and thickened, were its natural and fullest condition:

The heavy golden sunshine enriched the old brick with a kind of patina, and made the tower cast a long shadow across the grass, like the finger of a gigantic sundial veering slowly with the sun.

Everything was hushed and drowsy and silent, but for the coo of the white pigeons sitting alone together on the roof…They climbed the seventy-six steps of her tower and stood on the leaden flat, leaning their elbows on the parapet, and looking out in silence over the fields, the woods, the hop gardens, and the lake down in the hollow from which a faint mist was rising…’

By the late 16th century the site had been transformed by the affluent Baker family who built the magnificent Renaissance courtyard house, complete with vaulted gallery, 37 fireplaces and tower at its centre.

Sisinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The house was leased to the Government during the Seven Years War (1756-1763), and used as a prison camp for 3,000 captured French sailors who largely destroyed the house.

It is from this period Sissinghurst became known as Chateau de Sissingherst or Sissinghurst Castle.

In 1796 the Parish of Cranbrook took out a lease on Sissinghurst Castle Farm , creating a poor house where up to 100 men were offered housing, employment and food.

By the 1800s Sissinghurst was home to the Mann Cornwallis family who repaired the remaining buildings, leaving their legacy on the tower weather vanes marked ‘MC 1839’.

Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Today Sissinghurst is also a working farm with cattle, sheep and pigs and home to a rare species of wild flowers, insects and birds.

Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

 The garden is now looked after by a team of gardeners and volunteers.  There are several ‘rooms,’ each very different in their planting scheme, colours and scent.

Gardens at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Gardens at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

 I thought the ‘room,’ which was all white (every flower was white) was stunning.

The garden was not at its best, summer having taken its toll so my sister told me; she visits often as it is her most favourite of all places, but there was still enough to delight, and the whole place teemed with over-seas visitors and those like me; enjoying a wonderful day out in the 38 degree heat!!

Within the garden are several buildings dating from the original Tudor period.

Flowers at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Flowers at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

   South cottage and the South side of the house are still occupied by the Nicolson family.  

The White Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The White Garden (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Priest house to the North of the garden is available through National Trust cottages.  

The National Trust now owns Sissinghurst.  

Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Gardens at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Gardens at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

For over 50 years the gardens have been tended by 4 women head gardeners.

My sister and I climbed the tower steps, narrow, and winding, and looked in on small rooms as we headed for the roof; one of which was Vita’s work room. 

Sadly photography isn’t allowed inside the tower and buildings.

Vita kept her notes and manuscripts in the turret beyond the work room.

It was here in 1962, her son, Nigel, found the locked Gladstone bag which contained the manuscript confession of her love for Violet Trefusis.

Garden 'rooms' view from the Tower (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Garden ‘rooms’ view from the Tower (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Gardens at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Gardens at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

After Trefusis’s own death 10 years later, Nicolson published the manuscript as the basis for ‘Portait of a Marriage’, his study of his parents’ lives and sexuality.

Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Rd brick buildings (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Red brick buildings (c) Jane Risdon 2015

It was here in 1931 Vita wrote the poem which she called ‘Sissinghurst.’ It was the best thing, Harold thought, she ever wrote and she dedicated it to Virginia Woolf, who had been her lover.  

The poem addresses the core of Sissinghurst; it is a place apart.

Buried in time and sleep,

So drowsy, overgrown,

That here the moss is green upon the stone,

And lichen stains the keep.

For here, where days and years have lost heir number,                       

Garden rooms at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Garden rooms at Sissinghurst (c) Jane Risdon 2015

I let a plummer down in lieu of date,

And lose myself within a slumber,

Submerged, elate.

I must say I can see exactly where she is coming from with this poem.  I found Sissinghurst to be magical and beautiful; where time has stood still.  Tranquil, mesmerizing, and arousing.

All the senses are in play as you rove around the gardens and the buildings, with the sounds of birds and bees competing with the  symphony played in the moat as the water moves past the apple orchard opposite the woods.

I felt as if I’d gone back in time and any moment a lady in a beautiful gown would appear in one of the sculpted nooks and crannies which you come across as you walk from one vista to another.

It is a magical place and I do hope I get to go again one day.  I still had so much more to discover according to my sister.

If you would like to know more about Vita Sackville-West and her beloved Sissinghurst Castle Garden, check out these links.

Sissinghurst Castle, Biddenden Road, Near Cranbrook, Kent TN17 2AB England.

(2 miles north-east of Cranbrook, 1 mile east of Sissinghurst villlge on Biddenden Road, off the A262)

Tel: +44(0)1580 710701

Facebook Sissinghurst Castle – National Trust

Twitter @SissinghurstNT

The next part of my recent ‘jolly,’ is in the pipeline:  Knole House.

(more like a town than a house)

 I hope you enjoy this as much as I have compiling and posting it, and that you’ll let me know.

Jane x

As ever all photographs (c) Jane Risdon 2015 All Rights Reserved.

Revenge: Flash Fiction from 2013/2014 – a blast from the past.

A blast from the past – well, 2013/2014 actually.

Revenge (c) Jane Risdon 2013

Revenge (c) Jane Risdon 2013

Another of my Flash Fiction stories written to a maximum word count; this time 100 words.

This has been posted before, in 2013/2014, via Morgen Bailey’s Writing Blog,

but, as I am often asked to post some of my older pieces for those just discovering my blog,

I thought I’d post a few every now and again. 

Morgen’s introduction:

Welcome to Flash Fiction Friday and the one hundred and sixteenth piece in this series. This week’s is a 100-worder by Jane Risdon. This story will be podcasted in episode 36 (with three other stories / with two other stories and some 6-worders) on Sunday 26th January 2014.

So here goes.

I hope you enjoy:


(c) Jane Risdon 2013

My only regret is that when the realisation hits him, when all the evidence points to him and his life is in ruins, I shan’t be there to see the look on his face when it dawns on him.

Revenge is a dish best served cold apparently.  

Well, I shall be cold in my grave, unable to enjoy the moment my murder is pinned on him. 

I’ve left clues, irrefutable evidence.

Revenge Clues (c) Jane Risdon 2013

Revenge Clues (c) Jane Risdon 2013

No one will ever suspect that I murdered myself, but no matter. 

I go to my grave content that, for once, I have the upper hand.


Morgen asked me what prompted this piece:

I love writing about crime and wondered how someone would exact revenge upon another in the worst possible manner.  It occurred to me that to be the victim of a crime that was pinned on the person for whom they sought to punish, whom they hated enough to ‘murder’ themselves for, would be a great twist in the tale.

There is the body, indisputably dead, with all clues pointing to the murderer and the victim’s own words convicting him.  I love writing twists in my stories and for me this was delicious; the ultimate dish served cold.  I hope you agree.

Morgen said:

I do, absolutely. Thank you, Jane.

Morgen’s wonderful blog can be found here:

I hope you enjoyed this little piece. Let me know what you think.  I love feedback. It helps me with future writing.

Have a fab week everyone.

Jane xx (my Amazon author page) (my regular music blog)

Flash Fiction 2013: The Letter

The Letter

The Letter

Flash Fiction Friday 099: The Letter by Jane Risdon 2013

A Blast from the past – this was first published on Morgen Bailey’s Writing Blog:

I thought I’d share it again as I’ve been asked about it many times since.

Welcome to Flash Fiction Friday and the ninety-ninth piece in this series.

This week’s is a 450-worder by Jane Risdon.

This story will be podcasted in episode 32 (with three other stories) on Sunday 6th October.

Haunted by the neat sloping writing on the blue Basildon Bond paper which lay accusingly on her writing desk,

the old woman sat locked inside her thoughts. 

She couldn’t bear to pick the letter up to read it again, but there was no need really. 

The contents were not unexpected after-all. 

She’d been waiting nearly forty years for something like this to happen. 

And now it had.

Every knock at the door, every strange hand’s address on an envelope had filled her with such fear,

the like of which she could never share. 

She had never told.

The only reason she had an answering machine on her phone was so that she could screen her calls. 

Just in case. 

Now, there on the desk along with all her bills and other correspondence, the letter lay,

the words terrorising her silently across the darkening room.

She didn’t ask herself how or why. 

She knew the answers and had known this moment would come eventually, either in the form of a visit,

a phone call, or a letter. 

Forty birthdays had come and gone, and with each passing one she had agitated in case this time it would be the one;

the day when she would have to face her past.

Long ago she had put away the photo, the little sepia image now faded with age and fingering. 

There was nothing she could have done even if she had wanted to,

and she wasn’t even sure any longer if she had ever wanted to do anything. 

At first it was not a matter of choice but necessity, but there had come a time,

many years later when she supposed she could have, possibly should have, tried.

Soon it would be over. 

Of course she could ignore the letter but that might force a visit, in person, without warning. 

She could pretend it had never arrived and feign ignorance if anyone queried its receipt. 

Her stricken mind tried to battle with her emotions. 

Part of her needed this to happen, craved it, and dreaded it, fought against it and longed for it.

Her tired faded eyes moved across the room to stare at the blue ghost beckoning her. 

A date and a time had been suggested and if she didn’t respond the writer would understand,

after all it must be an awful shock after so many years, but hoped that she would consent to a meeting,

without strings of course.

Without strings, the old woman mused. 

There were always strings, and there would always be strings. 

She sighed heavily, tears brimming as she stood and made her way over to the letter. 

She picked it up, reached for the telephone and dialled.


Morgen asked me what made me write this story, here is my reply:

For thirty odd years I’ve been researching and writing our family history.

I’ve made lots of contacts, discovering long-lost and distant relations along the way.

Out of the blue some years ago one of them – a distant cousin by marriage –

emailed me asking if a person who’d contacted him had any links to our family. 

They did not, but the story he told me was fascinating and involved two women having babies at the same time,

in a mother and baby home. 

They each became Godmother to the other’s child and then went their separate ways.

A letter arrived many years later from one of these children,

asking if there was anyone in his (the distant cousin’s) family tree who might be her mother.

She’d been adopted, and since the surname of her birth mother was similar to a distant relative of ours,

her request was forwarded to me to check my records too.

Sadly there wasn’t anyone matching her mother’s details.

The letter had an enclosure, another letter destined for this girl’s mother,

which she had asked be forwarded in the event she could be found. 

I started to wonder what it must be like to receive such a letter, decades afterwards,

from someone kept secret from everyone else for so long. 

What would that do to a family or someone alone? 

Would they ever meet?  What would that meeting be like? 

So, I wrote The Letter.

I hope you enjoyed this story.  Do let me know.  Feedback is always valued and appreciated.

Doris Day, Sarah Weller, Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club, and me: the last of my 2015 birthday bashes

Doris Day: Public Domain

Doris Day – public domain

“I like joy; I want to be joyous. 

I want to smile and I want to make people laugh. 

And that’s all I want.  I like being happy.  I want to make others happy.” Doris Day.

Sarah Weller celebrates Doris Day's 91st birthday. Photo: Carl Hyde

Sarah Weller celebrates Doris Day’s 91st birthday Photo: Carl Hyde. Courtesy of Sarah Weller.

“I’ll remember this to my grave.  We all walked into a room to see the screen tests.  The first screen test was Marion Hutton’s. Then came Janis Paige [who ended up with a part in the film].  Then on the screen came Doris Day.  I can only tell you, the screen just exploded. There was absolutely no question.  A great star was born and the rest is history.” – Sammy Cahn

The second part of my birthday bash this year was a total surprise – a well-kept secret;  nothing was revealed to me as we travelled into the West End of London.

I hadn’t been up to Soho for some time and the amount of demolition going on was a huge shock.  They’ve even pulled down The Astoria – an iconic venue – where our artist’s performed back when. 

Tin Pan Alley is next on the demolition schedule I understand; what a travesty that will be – something to do with Cross-Rail apparently.

I recall many hours standing in this or that music publisher’s, back in the late 1960’s, waiting for my then boyfriend (later husband) and his band, as they trolled through sheet music with their management, looking for new songs to perform.  Their own song-writing efforts ended up as sheet music there as well.

It was a fab place to see, and be seen, and boy did we see some famous bands,  many singers – even the late Cilla Black was there on more than one occasion seeking songs – and songwriters too, all busy selecting their next big hit!

But, hey! That’s another story for another day.  

I have something coming out soon which tells a little of these times.

Back to my birthday bash:

I found myself in Frith Street, and there in front of me loomed another iconic venue.  Surely not!  It couldn’t be, could it? But it was. 

We were in the queue at Ronnie Scott’s world-famous Jazz venue and I still didn’t have a clue why I was there.

Ronnie Scott's Famous Jazz Club (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Ronnie Scott’s Famous Jazz Club (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Earlier in the year I’d been asked what I was doing on 29th March 2015 – a few weeks after my own birthday – I said nothing much, I seem to recall.

I was told not to plan anything; I was going somewhere special.

Then on 29th March I found myself outside Ronnie Scott’s, just after lunchtime, about to go in and see…I had no idea.

Questions went unanswered, smiles looked knowing. Nothing was being given away.  I looked round for clues, but there was nothing.

We were shown to our table and served huge Bloody Marys as the venue filled. I had a feeling of dread spread through me as I spotted a birthday cake set upon a round table on the stage; a spotlight shining upon it. 

Oh good grief!  They’d better not have! 

Still my companions wouldn’t let on who was going to be performing.  I was so excited, I’d never had a surprise birthday quite like this  before.

The lights dimmed; a pianist, a double bass player, a trumpeter, and guitarist, appeared on stage and settled themselves.  My heart almost stopped.

A spotlight followed a young blonde woman on to the stage.  She was wearing a lemon 1950’s style gown and she introduced herself and her musicians:

Sarah Weller and her band: The Mad Men.

Sarah Weller and The Mad Men

Sarah Weller and The Mad Men

I still didn’t get it.  Who was she?  I had no idea. Two pairs of eyes beside me watched my face eagerly, waiting for the penny to drop.

She continued to say that for the last four years she has performed a birthday celebration at Ronnie Scott’s Club for…

Oh my goodness!


Doris Day: public domain

Doris Day movie still – public domain

Tears trickled – I don’t do crying as a rule, so this was a big deal.

Anyone who knows me, cannot have failed to be aware that

I ADORE Doris Day.

Sarah Weller would be performing a tribute to Doris, whose 91st birthday would fall on April 3rd. 

She does not impersonate Doris – who could? 

At the end of the show she would be cutting birthday cake and sharing it with those celebrating birthdays around the same time.  She does this every year.  She is a massive fan too.

Sarah discovered – I later found out – that Doris sings in quite a low-key, which is not apparent when you hear her recordings.  If you hear Sarah sing you’d be forgiven for thinking she sounds quite low, and that perhaps the key is wrong.  It is not.

 “With a humble assurance befitting the experienced performer that she is, singer Sarah Weller treads lightly on the ‘American apple pie’ phenomenon of the iconic Doris whilst touching on some of the darker aspects of her often less than satisfactory relationships with the men in her life. No mere mimicry – this well-paced show is Sarah’s own ‘non-ironic’ take on Day’s life emanating from a genuine love of her heroine’s persona as a great actress as well as the show-stopping singer who touched all our hearts!” (Paul Pace – Music Co-ordinator for Ronnie Scott’s and The Spice of Life Jazz)

Sarah sings a tribute to Doris using the icon’s songs, with snippets of information about her life, recordings, and movies. 

Doris Day: Public Domain

Doris Day – public domain

Movies such as:

Calamity Jane (my favourite of her musicals)  featuring Howard Keel, another of my all time favourites.

 Pillow Talk with the gorgeous Rock Hudson,  and

Love Me or Leave Me, and Young at Heart. 

Songs such as: Sentimental Journey which was Doris’ first million seller in 1945 with the Les Brown Band. 

“She (Doris) was every bandleader’s dream, a vocalist who had natural talent, a keen regard for the lyrics and an attractive appearance.” – Les Brown

Rock Hudson was in the Navy when he first heard her singing this song,

which was number one for 9 weeks.

“It was evening, and we passed under the Golden Gate Bridge…its lights went on, and the voice of Doris Day began singing ‘Sentimental Journey’ over the loud-speakers. Well, that was the saddest bunch of sailors you ever saw. She had the whole ship in tears, including me. Fifteen years later, Doris and I worked together for the first time in Pillow Talk and by way of contrast, it was laughter all the way…” – Rock Hudson.

Rock and Doris made three movies together:  ‘Send Me No Flowers,’ and ‘Pillow Talk,’ and their last film together, ‘Love Come Back.’  Three of her funniest films I think.  Though my all time favourite is still ‘Calamity Jane,’ because I adore the songs.

  • “I remember writing with Hal David five different versions of ‘Send Me No Flowers.’ Finally they picked the last one — we kept going because we really wanted her [Doris] on the song. She did it great!” – Burt Bacharach(Songwriter/Pianist/Music Producer)
Rock Hudson in Movie Still for Giant. Public Domain

Rock Hudson in Movie Still for Giant. Public Domain

Doris Day1957 movie still - copyright unknow Public Domain.

Doris Day Movie Still 1957 – public domain

Sarah is a lifelong fan – like me – and her show pays tribute to the long and varied career Doris has enjoyed, and which made her a number one box-office star in the movies – she made 39 movies in 20 years – and a top-selling singer with almost 500 recordings.

“This girl has never had an acting lesson in her life but she draws on a wellspring of emotion and experience that makes her one of the finest instinctive actresses in the world.” – Michael Gordon (Director of Pillow Talk)

I could hardly contain myself, I was overcome and couldn’t speak.  My companions laughed as I choked back the tears.

The music started and Sarah told us a little about the song, when it was recorded, and for which movie, and she continued to do this for every song throughout her performance.

Her first song was ‘Let’s Fly Away, and this was followed  by ‘It’s Magic.’

The first set continued with her singing:

With a Song in My Heart,’ ‘Stardust,’ ‘I Know that You Know,’ ‘Makin’ Whoopee,’ ‘The One I Love (belongs to somebody else),’  ‘Bumblebee,’ and a medley from ‘Calamity Jane.’ which was awesome.

The audience went wild, many joining in singing along.  The atmosphere was magic. I was struck by the varied ages of the audience – young and older – and also by the many accents which we heard around us.  

The venue had sold out for the show well in advance of Sarah’s performance. I soon found out why. 

Sarah Weller is an amazing performer and singer in her own right, even without having the songs of Doris to interpret. 

Doris Day: unknown copyright

Doris Day – photo public domain

Sarah left the stage when she’d completed the first set, and meals and drinks were served for those wanting them. We were going on elsewhere later, so just had Bloody Mary refills. 

I love Ronnie Scott’s – it is such an intimate and vibrant club where all the greats have performed at some time or another. 

Ronnie Scott OBE (1927-1996) was a jazz legend; originally a  tenor saxophonist with the Johnny Claes band in 1944, and later with many others including Ted Heath and Bert Ambrose. 

He co-owned the club, which opened in October 1959, with fellow tenor saxophonist, Pete King,  situated in a basement in Gerrard Street, when it was known as ‘The Old Club.’ 

They moved to Frith Street in 1965 and the club became ‘Ronnie Scott’s,’ in 1967.

Sarah returned to the stage, dress in a beautiful green full length frock.

Sarah Weller sings Doris Day Photo: Carl Hyde Courtesy of Sarah Weller

Sarah Weller sings Doris Day at Ronnie Scott’s. Photo: Carl Hyde. Courtesy Sarah Weller

 Her second set continued with more chat and snippets about Doris, and her recording and movie career, as well as some more background (personal) detail about Doris’ life.

We were treated to:  

Ready, Willing and Able,’ ‘April in Paris,’ ‘Love Me or Leave Me,’

and one of my personal favourite’s, and Sarah’s, ‘Que Sera Sera.’

Then everyone joined in with ‘Hernando’s Hideaway,’ and ‘Teacher’s Pet,’ then ‘Close Your Eyes,’ followed by another personal favourite Sarah and I share; ‘Pillow Talk.’ from another wonderful movie she made with Rock Hudson – one of three they made.

Pillow Talk - public domain

Pillow Talk – public domain

On working with Doris, Rock said:

“Before we got under way, I had some apprehensions. I had never played comedy before, and here I was, thrown together with one of Hollywood’s most accomplished comediennes…but the best acting lesson came from Doris – her sense of timing, her instincts – I just kept my eyes open and copied her. I don’t really know what makes a movie team….I’d say, first of all, the two people have to truly like each other, as Doris and I did, for that shines through…” – Rock Hudson.

Rock Hudson and Doris became life-long friends right up until his death in the 1980s from Aids.

“…She asked me if I would speak to him (Rock), and move him to a guest cottage or property. She was gonna make chicken soup for the next 5 years if that’s what it took she’d do anything to nurse him back to health….” – Terry Melcher (Doris’s Son)

‘Move Over Darling,’ came next.  

A song co-written for Doris by her son; Record Producer, singer, instrumentalist, songwriter and publisher, not to mention her eventual manager,

Terry Melcher (1942-2004).

Terry Melcher in the studio 1965 with Gene Clarke and Dave Crosby of The Byrds working on Turn, Turn, Turn.

Terry Melcher in the studio 1965 with Gene Clarke and Dave Crosby of The Byrds working on Turn, Turn, Turn. Public domain

 Terry was her only son from her first marriage to trombone player, Al Jordan.  

They eventually divorced. She was married three times in total.  Terry was legally adopted by her third husband – the agent and producer – Marty Melcher.  A much disliked figure around Hollywood who eventually left Doris with huge debts. 

As I mentioned earlier, Terry was a talented musician in his own right, and in the early 1960s was in a duo, ‘Bruce and Terry,’ in which he partnered the future ‘Beach Boy’ Bruce Johnston, on the surf hit ‘Summer Means Fun,’ and he also recorded as ‘The Rip Chords,‘ and worked with Pat Boone and Frankie Laine, as well as the 1960s group, ‘Paul Revere and the Raiders.’

Terry Melcher with Paul Revere and the Raiders 1966 - public domain

Terry Melcher with Paul Revere and the Raiders 1966 – public domain

In 1964 Terry produced ‘The Byrds,’ on their version of Bob Dlyan’s, ‘Mr Tambourine Man,’ which is still a favourite of mine, as are ‘The Byrds.’  This record defined the folk-rock genre, topping the charts both in the USA and UK.  Other hits included: ‘I’ll Feel a Whole Lot Better,’ and another song I adore: ‘All I Really Want To Do,‘ as well as ‘The Bells of Rhymney,’ and the classic, ‘Turn, Turn, Turn,’ and ‘Chestnut Mare.’

A curious piece of trivia for you, which I will slip in, before I continue with Sarah’s set list.

It is widely believed that Terry Melcher was the intended victim of Charles Manson and his followers who broke into the home of Sharon Tate and Roman Polanski in 1969 and committed numerous murders. At one time Terry had rented the property on Cielo Drive, in LA, with his then girl-friend, Candice Bergen. Luckily they weren’t there at the time.  Apparently the record producer had turned Charles Manson down for a recording contract and the Cult leader wanted his revenge.

10050 Cielo Drive - public domain

10050 Cielo Drive – public domain

Many years later our son went to work for a movie producer who lived in a newly constructed house on the site of the, by then, demolished house, which had born witness to such atrocities.  Before the original house was demolished it  was purchased and lived in by a member of the band ‘Nine Inch Nails.’  But he decided it was too sad a place to live and felt uncomfortable there.  Not surprisingly. 

Terry helped rescue his mother from financial ruin, brought about my her husband, Marty Melcher’s mis-management of her career, when, in the 1980’s he produced his mother’s come-back TV series, ‘Doris Day’s Best Friends,’ and helped her run the Doris Day Animal League and the Doris Day Animal Foundation.

  • “She can make a record sound like there’s a smile or some kind of tear behind it.” – Terry Melcher (Doris’s son)

Rock Hudson appeared on her show, just two months before he died.

“I had to have Rock Hudson as my first guest so I called him, and he said “I’ll be there…you can count on me” and that was the truth! All his friends, and there were so many, could always count on him. He didn’t talk about his illness any time…I can only tell you my friends, it was a heartbreaking time for me, without my faith I would be a lot sadder than I am today. I know that life is eternal and that something good is gonna come from this experience. Anyway let’s think of him with laughter ‘cause he was so funny!” – Doris Day

Sadly, Terry died in 2004 from cancer, leaving a wife Teresa and a son, Ryan.

Back to my birthday treat:

Doris Day - public domain

Doris Day – public domain

Sarah continued her second set with

another of my favourites (there are so many), ‘Perhaps, Perhaps, Perhaps,’ which

led into the final song performed by Sarah; ‘Sentimental Journey.’

Sarah went on to serve a birthday cake she’d made, to those in the audience who were celebrating their birthdays around the same time as Doris.  I was tempted to join in, but decided to sit and enjoy the atmosphere instead.  Sarah serves cake every year, which I felt was a lovely touch.  Needless to say, there was a long queue for cake.

Sarah Weller cuts cake celebrating Doris Day's 91st Birthday. Photo: Carl Hyde courtesy Sarah Weller

Cutting cake to celebrate Doris’ 91st birthday. Photo Carl Hyde courtesy Sarah Weller

Disappointingly, Sarah didn’t perform a song which I also really love, and which Doris is supposed to have recorded in one take. But I soon got over it.

 ‘Secret Love,’ from Calamity Jane.

To record a song in one take is special, and I have actually worked with two female artists (managed them) who could also do this.  True professionals and unbelievable talent.

 I seem to recall someone writing on one of Doris’ album covers, that she turned up at the studio at 5.55pm and left at 6pm – I don’t know how true it is, but in that time Doris recorded ‘Secret love.

“When I recorded for Columbia, I could usually do anything in one take…I would invariably want to use the first take because that would be the one that was spontaneous and fresh.” – Doris Day

I absolutely loved the whole show.  The musicianship was wonderful, and I should know.  Sarah is an amazing performer, she does not try to be Doris or look like her.  She sings in her own voice.  Hers is a real tribute to a fantastic performer.

Her band are talented players and it must be wonderful to perform with them.

The Mad Men Photo: Carl Hyde courtesy Sarah Weller

The Mad Men Photo: Carl Hyde courtesy Sarah Weller

They are:  Freddie Gavita, trumpet: Simon Golding, guitar: Arthur Lea, piano: Spencer Brown, bass: Simon Pearson, drums.

The Mad Men Photo Carl Hyde courtesy Sarah WellerThe Mad Men Photo Carl Hyde courtesy Sarah Weller

The Mad Men Photo Carl Hyde Courtesy Sarah Weller

Doris also made movies with other much loved actors such:  James Garner, David Niven, Rod Taylor, Cary Grant, and James Stewart to name a few.

 ‘The Thrill of It All’ was one of Doris Day’s top three highest grossing films and one of her most popular. She loved working with James Garner:

Day-Garner-Thrill of it All. public domain

Day & Garner. Public domain

“I had the same kinship with Jimmy (James Garner) that I had with Rock-truly a blessing to have had two such talented, amusing, darling men to work with, men with whom I have had enduring friendships. I really love Rock and Jimmy.”  – Doris Day, Her Own Story.

On hearing about James Garner’s death:

Jame Garner. Public Domain

James Garner: public domain

“I loved Jimmy. He was a wonderful actor and a joy to work with. We made two films together and just clicked from the minute we met. We remained friends over the years and spoke often on the phone. I knew he was quite ill and unable to talk on the phone in recent months. The world has lost an exceptional human being and I lost a dear friend. I will miss him so much.” Doris Day

Following the performance by Sarah and her band, my two companions, who’d treated me to such a fab time, took me out to eats and to meet some friends of theirs in the Palladium bar, at the London Palladium.

A perfect end to a perfect birthday weekend, although my birthday was earlier in the month. It was a fab way to join in Doris Day’s 91st birthday celebrations.

Ever since I was a little girl I have loved Doris Day, her songs, dancing and movies.  I cannot explain why, at such a young age, she captivated me.  I can sit through her movies time after time and never be bored. I can listen to ‘the voice with a smile,’ and she uplifts me.  There are few female singers I really like, but she is top of the list for me. I wanted to be her when I was growing up.

“I just feel so fortunate and so blessed to have been able to entertain people in the theatres and on record, it’s just an amazing life that I’ve experienced.” – Doris Day

“I always felt that making a living wasn’t the easiest thing in the world, and I decided I was going straight ahead and try to be as uncomplicated as possible. The important thing in life is just living and loving.” – Doris Day

I had great fun researching this article and I hope you have had great fun reading it, and you are uplifted by Doris Day the same way I am.  I hope you are left smiling after reading this, and that you might be tempted to go and put her movies or her records on, and dance.  Sing at the top of your voice and enjoy ‘The Thrill of it All.’ 

But…before you do

I thought you might like to know more about the talented Sarah Weller and The Mad Men

who made my treat so special and memorable.

I did, after seeing her wonderful performance.

 So, I contacted her and asked her to allow me to use her photos of her show at Ronnie Scott’s. She graciously agreed.  Not only that, she agreed to allow me to interview her.

Sarah Weller celebrates Doris Day's 91st birthday

Sarah Weller celebrates Doris Day’s 91st birthday

Here is my interview with Sarah Weller.

I hope this makes you want to see her perform, not just Doris Day hits, but Jazz, which she loves and performs in her own right.

She has a record out at the moment.

At what age did you realise you wanted to sing? Age 5.  My mum told me to get my head out of the clouds.

Where & when was your first performance (school/clubs etc)? I did a lot of acting at school and one of my earliest performances was as Levi in Joseph and his Technicolour Dream Coat.  I always loved both acting and singing.

Did you have, or ever contemplate having, singing lessons? – I had 11 lessons with jazz vocalist Lee Gibson at The Guildhall as a private student until the money ran out… I sang in the school choir and loved that.  The highlight was Carmina Burana at the Albert Hall as part of A Night of 1000 Voices.

Did you ever use a hairbrush as a mic, and did you sing in your bedroom? Of course, especially along to Barbara Streisand, Whitney Houston and George Benson.

Whose records did you sing along to growing up, and in your bedroom? Anything by Barbara Streisand, Whitney Houston and George Benson.

Do you play an instrument?  What is it, and how did you learn – lessons or by ear? NO.

Do you write songs of your own, or do you prefer to sing those written by others? I do write my own songs and it’s something I should do more often.  I have released albums with a mix of originals and covers but it’s hard to beat the likes of Cole Porter and Irving Berlin!

Who is your favourite songwriter/composer and why? Irving Berlin, Gus Khan, Cole Porter.  It was their job and so they continually churned out fantastic lyrics and music in so many genres.

What was the first real gig you ever went to?  Band?  Singer? And where? Michael Jackson 1989 during his BAD tour at Wembley Arena.

Who makes your frocks for your performances?  Are your Doris Day frocks made by someone else, or the same person, or do you buy ‘off the peg’? Vintage all the way.  I scour the charity shops.  The yellow one I wear was my wedding dress from 2002 when I got married in Vegas!

Sarah in her wedding dress cutting cake at Ronnie Scott's Photo: Carl Hyde courtesy Sarah Weller

Sarah in her wedding dress cutting cake at Ronnie Scott’s Photo: Carl Hyde courtesy Sarah Weller

Where do you get your blonde wigs?  Are these specially made? No, I chose one-off the internet from a site like that seemed appropriate for the show then had it cut whilst on my head at the hairdressers while showing the hairdresser a photo of Doris!

Sarah Weller and The Mad Men Photo: Carl Hyde Courtesy Sarah Weller

Sarah Weller and The Mad Men Photo: Carl Hyde Courtesy Sarah Weller

What do you do to relax? Cycle, a sport that Doris herself loved.

Who do you listen to when not learning someone’s songs/music to perform? Jazz, I can’t get enough of it.

What genres of music do you love and why? Jazz, soul and funk.  I have to listen to something that has a groove because I love to dance.

What genre of music do you dislike the most and why? There are so many genres I find it hard to appreciate.  There is so much good music that I just avoid the sound of anything that doesn’t interest me but then time passes and sometimes I can appreciate things from the past that I hadn’t liked at the time.  I’m quite open to change!

If you could travel anywhere in the world to see someone perform, who would it be and where would you love to enjoy the gig? I think I would love to listen to music in Tokyo, a place I would love to visit so it would have to be Pat Metheny at The Blue Note.

Who would you love to give a private performance for and why?  Or have you already?  Who and where and why? An influential agent who would sign me up and get me on the road 365 days a year! Singing is all I ever want to do.

If you weren’t a performer, what would you do for a living? Be a detective or a writer of detective fiction.  It’s the why and how I love.

If you met Doris Day and could spend time with her, what would you like to ask her? If I managed to speak (from adoration silencing me) I would ask her what it was like to be a woman of the 50s.  The era fascinates me and I would like every detail, who she met, who influenced her in her life, what made her so strong.

 Which is your favourite Doris Day song and why?  Que Sera Sera.  I love the sentiment, the idea of fate, the idea that no matter what the age nothing changes, it circles around and around. It also makes me think of my children then I have to try not to cry.

Which is your favourite Doris Day movie and why? Pillow Talk for the glamour and the comedy.

Rock Hudson & Doris Day. Pillow Talk publicity photo. public domain

Rock Hudson & Doris Day. Pillow Talk publicity photo. public domain

Who is your favourite leading man in a Doris Day movie and why? Rock Hudson.  He was so handsome.

Which frock from a Doris Day movie would you love to own and wear? Or trousers or other outfit? Anything from Pillow Talk

What is it about Doris Day that made you want to sing her songs and to perform a tribute to her each birthday? Her generous heart and I like strong women and I think there are very few as strong and enduring as Doris Day.  She worked so hard all her life and had to go through such hardships in her personal life and she still dedicates her life to others.

If you could have a songwriter/composer write specifically for you, who would it be and why?  I would like Cole Porter to write a witty song.  I miss comedy in performance.

What style would you like them to write in for you? Jazz from the 50s of course!

How did you come to have the band you work with?  When and where did you find them? I’m lucky to have seen and played with many musicians and now I like to choose musicians that I like personally as well as for their talents. 

Did they ask to back you or did you ask them?  When and where was your first gig with them? I had played with them all in different bands so asked them to join me when I got the band together.  The first gig together was at Ronnie Scott’s 2010. Only the pianist has changed.

Ronnie Scott’s is an iconic venue – when was your first gig there and what did you perform?  How did it feel being on the stage so many famous stars had performed on? June 2010.  It was a dream come true and extremely nerve-racking. I will never take any gig for granted especially at Ronnie’s.

Do you have a recording contract and is it for being a singer in your own right, or as someone who does covers of other artists? No I self-release under my label Daisy Dog Productions. I felt I didn’t want to record or release the Doris show as an album.  I encourage people to go out and buy her records and appreciate her voice for the marvel it is.

If you could record/perform with someone from the past – musicians or other vocalists – who would that be and why?  I think I would have liked the Donna Summer role in the song Enough is Enough with Barbra Streisand. Barbra was such an influence early on – not so much now, but as a girl wanting to be a singer.

If you could record/perform with someone from the present – musicians or other vocalists – who would that be and why?  Christian McBride on bass, Aaron Diehl on piano and Kendrick Scott on drums.  They are my favourite rhythm section at the moment.

Have you ever wanted to perform a Movie or TV soundtrack?  If you could pick one from the past what would it have been?  Are there any movies being made today you’d love to have a crack at performing the soundtracks for? I would love to.  I love Mad Men so to feature on the sound track would be amazing because the music is so well-chosen every episode.

Where do you see your career heading in the future and what are your ambitions? As long as I am singing I will be happy.

Sarah, many thanks for agreeing to feature in my blog and for taking the time to share your photos and other information with me.

Huge thanks also to Tim and Mark for giving me such a fantastic birthday treat.  

I feel so privileged and spoiled, and appreciate it more than you can ever know.


If you are interested and want to know more about Sarah and her musical career, her gigs, her recordings, and schedule, here are some links:

Sarah’s Website:

Sarah’s Facebook page (tribute to Doris Day):

Sarah’s interview of Jazz FM regarding her appearance this year at  Ronnie Scott’s:

Sarah live at Ronnie Scott’s:  Perhaps – YouTube

Sarah’s photos come from her own Collection.  The Photographer: Carl Hyde.  
Thanks so much for allowing me to use them.

I do hope you have enjoyed reading about my birthday bash, and finding out about Doris Day and Sarah Weller.  

Let me know.

Jane xx





The Honey Trap – Flash Fiction under 1,000 words. Another blast from the past…

Another blast from the past – 2012

Flash Fiction has always interested me.  

Here is another story I wrote in 2012 for inclusion on Morgen Bailey’s Writing Blog.

Here is how she presented it:

Welcome to Flash Fiction Friday and the sixty-third piece of flash fiction in this series. This week I welcome back author Jane Risdon with a 968-worder…

Thames House home of MI5 (c) attributed to Cnbrb English Language Wikipedia

Thames House home of MI5 (c) attributed to Cnbrb English Language Wikipedia

The Honey Trap (c) Jane Risdon 2012

They flirted in the bar, drinking, and chatting, until the music stopped and the bartender shook his head. No more drinks.

Taking the hint they moved towards the revolving doors about to make for the bright city lights and another hotel bar, when his young companion shook her head and whispered her suggestion.

Why not go upstairs to her friend’s room and have some more drinks? Luckily her friend was away for a few days and she had the key, what did he think?

He thought it was a great idea. She thought he was too drunk to go much further anyway, and the prospect of getting the almond-eyed beauty into bed was more than he could resist, she was sure.

He nodded and followed her to the elevator.

She pressed the button for the tenth floor, snuggling up to him, nibbling his ear, whispering suggestive things in a husky voice full of promise.

She knew he couldn’t believe his luck.

His meeting with the Ministry of Trade representatives had gone well, and they decided to go for dinner at the Majestic Hotel a few blocks away. At dinner he and his colleagues were introduced to several young ladies, beautiful, and fluent in English.

A little reward for getting the Eastern Europeans to sign the contracts with little or no hassle, they all assumed.

She had made it clear that she fancied him from the start and they were soon alone, the others having returned to their hotels with companions of their own no doubt.

He had hoped she would want to spend the night with him, it had been on his mind all night.

They reached her friend’s room and she opened the door and put the light on, kicking off her stilettos and heading for the hotel fridge, as he put the ‘Do Not Disturb’ sign on the door, and took his jacket off, placing his extra-large briefcase on the floor near the bed.

Do Not Disturb

He moved behind her, kissed her neck and her smooth soft brown shoulders, taking in her musky scent and running his hands over her hips and thighs. She turned to kiss him and soon they were heading for the bed.

However, before things went any further she headed for the bathroom.

He quickly and silently moved around the room, checking the drawers, the cupboard, and looking under the bed and behind the pictures, and lamp fittings. The Cold War might be over, he thought, but he knew a ‘Honey Trap,’ when he saw one.

He found nothing, surprisingly, which worried him more than if he had found a hidden camera and microphone.

After a while she returned, all smiles, and full of enthusiasm, and before long they were having sex which, although he was enjoying himself as much as his partner, didn’t stop him from keeping one eye on the bedroom door.

He was sure that her controllers would be rushing in before long, ready for the ‘Blackmail’ pitch.

Therefore he had to work fast.

He turned her onto her stomach and she squealed with anticipation. Running his hands over her back and shoulders he leaned towards her and nuzzled her neck.

She lifted her head to meet his lips as he quickly took the scarf he had hidden under the pillows, and expertly wrapped it around her neck. At first she seemed surprised and then, thinking it was all part of the game, smiled wantonly at him.

After all, it was her job to please him.

Suddenly he began to squeeze tighter and tighter. As she began to choke somewhere in her oxygen-starved brain it dawned on her that this wasn’t a game after all.

By then it was too late. The last thing she saw was his laughing face gazing at her as she died.

He rose quickly, pulling on surgical gloves.

Then he placed her body on the floor as he removed the sheets and pillowcases, putting them in his large briefcase, along with the wine glass he had used.

He took her body into the bathroom and placed her in the bath where he washed her, and her hair. After she was dry he took her back into the bedroom and laid her on the stripped bed, arranging her in his favourite pose.

Bathroom (c) Jane Risdon 2012

A Bathroom features in my Flash Fiction story The Honey Trap 30th Nov 2012 – (c)
Jane Risdon 2012

He cleaned the bathroom, and with a last glance round the hotel room, checking he had left no trace of himself, he silently let himself out of the room and made his way down the back stairs where his driver waited for him.

He felt a sense of relief and elation as they drove away, sure in the knowledge that this was another ‘situation,’ which would go unreported by the authorities.

After all, she was their agent, and her job had been to involve him, the Second Secretary at the British Mission, in what has always been known as ‘A Honey trap,’ so they could blackmail him into working for them.

Well, he was too good for them, he thought as he settled back in his seat.

He had been in his post for years, working all around the world, and allowing himself to be drawn into their so-called ‘delicate situations,’ and yet he had never been caught.

He enjoyed his work and loved to tease the enemy.

He knew his little calling card would be recognised, but what could they do? Admit they had planned to compromise a British diplomat who just happened to eliminate their ‘Bee,’ before they could act – he didn’t think so.

Next month he was being posted to Tel Aviv. He heard the women there were beautiful and knew how to handle themselves.

They all had to do a stint in the Army. The challenge thrilled him. He couldn’t wait.

The Honey trap (c) Jane Risdon 2012

The Honey Trap, Pod-cast 24th March 2013 
(c) Jane Risdon 2012


I (Morgen) asked Jane what prompted this piece and she said…

Espionage has always fascinated me and I love reading anything about Spies and the way the Secret Services around the world operate. I worked at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in Whitehall, London, in my youth and it was amazing – so different to anything I had expected; much less stuffy for a start.

All the stories I heard concerning the great Spies such as Burgess and Maclean, (The Cambridge Five), made a big impact on me, and deep down I think I do want to write a Spy Novel.  When I began to write The Honey Trap I had spies and espionage in mind, but as it developed it turned into a typical Honey Trap, but with a difference.  Many of my short stories have an unexpected twist in the tale… this is another.

I may develop it more one-day and turn it into a novel.

Yes, do, it was great. Thank you Jane.

Thanks for sharing my work, Morgen.

I hope you enjoy this. Let me know.


Morgen’s fab blog with so much for authors is at:

If you are interested in The Cambridge Spy ring, do check this out:


Changing the Guard: Flash Fiction from 2013

Changing the Guard, Flash Fiction (c) Jane Risdon 2013

Changing the Guard, Flash Fiction (c) Jane Risdon 2013

 Canadian Voice-Over Actor Elijah Lucien

recently recorded my 191 word Flash Fiction story

Changing The Guard

which I managed to listen to on YouTube recently.

It was such a thrill hearing it read by a professional actor,

I thought I’d share Elijah’s reading here:

 I wrote the story in 2013

I recall being inspired, having been shown a photo of some people sitting around a long white clothed table  and being reminded of a scene from Some Like It Hot,

and various News items around that time, regarding a Mafia Don who’d just been arrested and was about to stand trial in Italy.

Suddenly Changing The Guard appeared vividly, in pictures, in my head,

and I had to run to get it down before I forgot it.

Morgen Bailey originally featured the story on her Writing Blog and Pod-cast it later in the year.

Here is how she presented it:

Welcome to Flash Fiction Friday and the one hundred and eleventh piece in this series.

This week’s is a 191-worder by Jane Risdon.

This story will be read by Morgen in a podcast: episode 35 (with two other stories and some 6-worders) on Sunday 29th December.


And here is my story:

Changing the Guard

Sam ‘The Stiletto,’ Musso waited until the noise died down before clearing his throat and looking up from his notes.

‘We are agreed. No more discussion, no more voting.  Sonny Versace is toast.’ Hands and cutlery thudded on the white clothed tables as the various Families showed their approval.

‘Don Giacanni, ‘The South-side Chapter,’ has elected to make the arrangements.  He has given the honour of ‘retiring’ Sonny to his trusty foot-soldier, ‘Arturo, ‘I invoke the Fifth’ Giovanni.’

Cheering and more table banging followed as Sam smiled at the white-haired Don sitting at the table opposite.

The only female Don watched carefully as her fellow Dons made their way out of the dining room.

They suspected nothing.

Those sitting with her began discussing who would have the largest slice of Sonny’s part of the city. 

She waited, silent, amused.

Without warning Sam fell forward on to the table, as dead as he could be. 

Before the others could react, they too fell forward; dead.

Sophia, ‘The Nurse,’ sat quietly, listening to the sounds of gunfire and screams coming from outside.

Her foot-soldiers had succeeded, and she was now undisputed Don of Dons.


Morgen asked me what prompted this piece and here’s my reply:

This short story was written for one of my writing group competitions which had a maximum word count of 200 words.  I enjoy a challenge.

Anyone who has read anything I’ve written, or seen interviews with me, will know I’ve spent most of my life in the Music Business, and you will have noticed a number of references to ‘certain’ people who’ve crossed my path during those years;

I suppose my love of crime, mystery, and espionage has to come out somehow, and mixing my experience of ‘certain’ people, with one or other of these much-loved themes, proved too good to miss.

I’d also heard of a Mafia trial in Italy, on the News, and I guess it must have sparked my imagination.

Talk was of who would take the place of the Don, now held in custody, and suddenly I thought about a female Don.

I’ve no idea if they exist, or could exist, in such a male dominated world, but what a thought!

One of my all time favourite movies is ‘Some Like it Hot,’ – the birthday party scene came to mind; machine gunner emerging from the cake as they all celebrated at the long table.

(c) Jane Risdon 2013


I loved it (as always). Thank you, Jane.  Morgen.

Morgen’s Pod-cast of my story links:

 This episode contained: fourth batch of 6-word stories (by including William BortzCaroline CannonsLaura RittenhouseKen MageeMark MorrisKimberly SperlingKaren Bate, and yours truly), then longer flash fictions: Changing the Guard by Jane Risdon, Old Norse by Jade Kennedy, and The Third Rail by Christopher Farley.

*See the links above to read the stories… or hear Morgen’s dulcet tones on the podcast.

The podcast is available via Google’s Feedburner (final item), iTunes (first item), Podbean (when it catches up), Podcasters (which takes even longer) or Podcast Alley (which doesn’t list the episodes but will let you subscribe).

You will also find some of my other Flash Fiction stories, and Pod-casts of them, on the above links.

I hope you enjoy hearing Elijah’s reading of my story and also my written version.  Let me know. 



Windsor to Bray: Messing about on the River

Windsor to Bray (C) Jane Risdon 2015

Windsor to Bray (C) Jane Risdon 2015

Windsor Castle (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Windsor Castle (c) Jane Risdon 2015

I’ve been feeling chained to my writing desk since the start of the year, and by the end of last week I’d had enough.

 So, I got seriously radical (for me these days) and decided to take the day off and escape somewhere lovely.

I didn’t fancy a lot of hassle, so I got a bus to Windsor for a day trip.

Leaving home early I hoped Windsor wouldn’t be too busy with tourists at that hour, leaving me long enough to stroll around and enjoy myself before the streets thronged with occupants of our Global Village.

I know, I often have adventures on buses as many of you might know, but this time I went upstairs (double-decker buses have their uses), to escape the maddening crowd.

Being up so high afforded a fantastic view of huge country houses with their large landscaped gardens, endless green and cultivated fields, and little chocolate box villages.

The countryside on the way was beautiful, lush, and green, and with a cloudless sky overhead; not even the endless take off and landing aircraft at Heathrow (flying overhead every 30 seconds or so), was going to spoil my escape.

Not having my usual Canon camera with me – it is on the blink – I had no option but to take my phone camera.  I was uncertain as to how any photos I took might turn out.

I’ll let you decide.

Changing the Guard at Windsor (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Changing the Guard at Windsor (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Changing of the Guard at Windsor Castle was about to take place when I arrived and the main road leading to the castle was closed off.

Rather than wait about 20 minutes for it to be re-opened, I got off the bus and decided to walk the rest of the way, 

stopping long enough to watch the Coldstream Guards leaving their barracks (The Victoria Barracks) to march to the castle. 

Guards Marching to Windsor Castle (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Guards Marching to Windsor Castle (c) Jane Risdon 2015

 I strolled towards the castle in the rising temperature wondering how on earth the  Guards coped with their uniforms and busbies.

Too late; the tourists had arrived early as well.  I was not going to manage to take photos unimpeded by strangers popping into them.

Windsor Castle from a side street (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Windsor Castle from a side street (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The last time I visited Windsor, and had a proper look round, including inside the castle, was when our son was about six years old.  I can recall the visit really well for a few reasons: 

Our son thought he was going to turn into a Knight once inside the castle.  Only knights were allowed to go inside them after-all.  

The Queens Doll’s house impressed the heck out of him but he couldn’t understand why anyone would want one. 

The car broke down on the way home, and we had to wait for  few hours until the RAC (Royal Automobile Association) turned up to fix it.  Thankfully we were saved from the indignity of a tow home.

And, it was the day Elvis Presley died.    

I wandered up the main street but after a while gave up trying to take photos, the crowds were already swelling,

and so I retraced my steps and headed towards Eton.   

I’ve not been to Eton for many years either, and was surprised to see the town a little worse for wear, and many favourite pubs and restaurants gone.

Some of its old charm seems to have been lost, which is a pity.

On the Bridge over the Thames (c) Jane Risdon 2015

On the Bridge over the Thames (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Old Fashioned Street Signs (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Old Fashioned Street Signs (c) Jane Risdon 2015

On the whole it was still enjoyable however; some of the buildings retain their magic. 

I was sad to see that The Cockpit, an ancient pub I recall from many moons ago, was boarded up and for sale.  

Notice the pair of stocks still outside the building.


The Cockpit (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Cockpit (c) Jane Risdon 2015

 Here are some photos of Eton, which was still quiet when I was first there.

A Courtyard Entrance (c) Jane Risdon 2015

A Courtyard Entrance (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Eton (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Eton (c) Jane Risdon 2015

One of the older buildings (c) Jane Risdon 2015

One of the older buildings (c) Jane Risdon 2015

  I noticed, looking in one  Estate Agent’s window, that the average price of one of these riverside apartments (below) is £1.2 million.  

The apartments overlook where the river boats moor, and operate their businesses, so I’m not sure if I’d want one; looking out on all the boats and tourists queuing for them is not something I’d pay that amount for. 

The boat rides go to various destinations and back.  You can take a 40 minute ride or a 2 hour ride.  You can pre-book a seat on several trips going up and down the river in both directions.

I decided to go for a 2 hour ride from Windsor (Boveney) to Bray and back.

Taking in almost 5 miles of picturesque Thames scenery with lots of historic sights along the way.

Very high end apartments (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Very high end apartments (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Riverside businesses on the Eton side of the river (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Riverside businesses on the Eton side of the river (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Setting off on board The Lady Ann Margaret (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Setting off on board The Lady Ann Margaret (c) Jane Risdon 2015

 Passing little islands with some fabulous houses belonging to the rich, and sometimes famous, their grounds sweeping down to the water’s edge, the boat glided along peacefully, the sound of the water lapping the sides and the birds singing overhead, it was sheer bliss for me. 

The boat comes in (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The boat comes in (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The boat was not crowded and I sat on the top deck – on the right had side going down and the left coming back.  We passed river boats, barges, and the higher end of the market vessels; chic white and slick. 

Picnic by the River (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Picnic by the River (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Some anchored alongside the banks where their owners disembarked to picnic under the afternoon sun.

Barges on the river (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Barges on the river (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Afternoon tea (cream tea), could be taken on board, if pre-booked – which I didn’t – and all manner of drinks and beverages were available including Pimms and various ciders. 

I treated myself to a long cold cider and it was really welcome as the sun grew hotter.

I took dozens of photos but cannot add them all here obviously. There were some amazing houses – Jimmy Page (Led Zep) had one on the river until not too long ago. I could just about see the red brick building through the trees, but I missed getting a photo as someone’s head kept bobbing up in the way.

Suffice to say it was something else! 

The house on the left (below), once belonged to the Ballet dancer, Dame Margot Fonteyn.  Her mother purchased it for her in the 1950’s.  Sadly some years later the M4 motorway was situated a stone’s throw from her home.  Not her idea of peace and quiet I am sure. 

Dame Margo Fontein's House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Dame Margo Fontein’s House (c) Jane Risdon 2015

On the right (below), is Monkey Island Hotel.  The island was originally attributed (apparently) to the paintings of various monkeys on the ceiling of a pavilion on the island, erected by the 3rd Duke of Marlborough; or a fanciful corruption of ‘Monks Ait,’ since there was believed to be a monks’ cell there. It is now a 1st class hotel.

Monkey Island Hotel (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Monkey Island Hotel (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Somewhere in these parts Three Men in a Boat (Jerome K Jerome) had their sad lunch of beef with no mustard and an un-openable tin of pineapples, which was consigned to a watery grave.

We came across an Indian Wedding celebration on the lawns, sweeping down to the river, of a huge house. I think we’d missed the ceremony and were passing during the reception.  It was so colourful, with lots of red and gold sari’s and the white of the men in their outfits.  The water was filled with rose petals – confetti I guess.

Indian Wedding (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Indian Wedding (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Confetti on the river (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Confetti on the river (c) Jane Risdon 2015

               If you look closely you will see the petals floating on the water in the second photo.

Going through the lock (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Going through the lock (c) Jane Risdon 2015

We went through a Lock on the way there and back.  I’ve never been on a boat going through one before and it was magic.  It took quite a while for the water to drop and rise again and other boats were queuing behind ours.

We sailed past Boveney Church, dedicated to Mary Magdalene, dating from the 12th century. It is rarely used as a church now, but more by Movie and TV companies who like the Medieval religious setting.

St Mary Magdalene (c) Jane Risdon 2015

St Mary Magdalene (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The 1990 Robin Hood movie with Kevin Kostna and ITV’ Inspector Morse were filmed there.

We sailed on past The Bray Film Studios – now derelict – where so many Hammer Horror Movies were made.  The buildings are an extension of an old house called Down Place, which was taken over by Hammer Films in 1950.  The original house stood there from about 1518 – records of the property purchases go back to then. 

Bray Studio (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Bray Studio (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The present building to which the studios were added dates from 1750.  The most famous occupant was Jacob Tonson, a London bookseller, and founder of the Kit-Kat Club, at first sight a gathering of men of influence, letter and the arts, but in fact a society formed for the defence of the House of Hanover at a time when it was feared there might be another Jacobite claim to the throne.

Way back when (in my other guise in music) I recall meetings with Hammer Films regarding music for soundtracks and other matters.  It’s sad to think of the buildings being demolished soon and the links with Bray gone forever.

I could list the sights and add photos for so many lovely and historical points of interest on this trip but that would mean pages and pages…I don’t want to bore you.

Here are a few more photos I took on the trip.  I do hope you enjoy them and that if given the opportunity to visit Windsor, Eton and take the boat trip, you will grab it.

Messing about on the River (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Messing about on the River (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The River Thames(c) Jane Risdon 2015

The River Thames(c) Jane Risdon 2015

I had a fab day out. 

I got lots of fresh air, enjoyed the sunshine, and tranquillity of the river, and managed to blow away lots of cobwebs from my fogged-up brain.

Windsor to Bray (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Windsor to Bray (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Now it is back to the writing desk and

my novel.  Refreshed and ready to go.

Thanks for being here.

Catch up again soon. 

All photos are (c) Jane Risdon 2015 All Rights Reserved.

A Walk to Destiny – A short story from 2013

I do hope you enjoy this story

which I originally wrote  for inclusion in an anthology benefitting a Charity for Domestic Abuse.

Sadly the anthology never materialised.

It was later published by Morgen Bailey on her Writing Blog. 

There isn’t a murder or a crime –  as such…

Here it is again.

I thought I’d add some photos (taken by me) to add some colour.

This stile features in My short story; A Walk To Destiny. (c) Jane Risdon 2012 - links on my blog-roll

This stile features in My short story; A Walk To Destiny. (c) Jane Risdon 2012 – links on my blog-roll

A Walk To Destiny

by Jane Risdon (c) 2012

The ancient wooden gate creaked loudly as she pushed against it. The leaf-dappled lane she found herself in smelled of damp earth, moss, and rotting leaves which stuck to the bottoms of her walking shoes as she made her way slowly, taking in the sheer peace of the place. As sunlight filtered through the heavy tree canopy and danced upon the ground in front of her, she could hear rustling and fluttering, as birds and other small animals moved about their business inside the thick green hedges stretching as far as she could see on either side of the lane.

The Lane (c) Jane Risdon 2011

The Lane (c) Jane Risdon 2011

Overhead high in the blue cloudless sky an aeroplane droned as it climbed higher, and she thought how typical of a summer day that sound was. It never failed to remind her of her childhood. She was transported back to about age five, reading ‘Dick and Dora,’ and ‘Janet and John’, somewhere outside, bathed in sunshine, and with the smell of freshly mown grass.

Somehow it made her feel safe and happy.

Walking along the lane (c) Jane Risdon 2011

Walking along the lane (c) Jane Risdon 2011

After a few minutes she came to a stile, made of rusted iron, overgrown with vegetation, and she took great care climbing over it – even though she wore jeans she was wary of the stinging nettles.

She stood looking around at the slight change of landscape. To her left there was a vast expanse of farmland, some fields looked as if something was growing there, but she could not see what, other fields looked fallow.

Beyond the fields in the distance the land rose and was covered in a mass of green. Dark green, light green and almost grey-green leafed trees seemed to hover above the fields. They looked wonderful against the blue sky; almost Germanic.

Memories of the Ruhr valley came to mind with the endless swathes of forests she had loved when she had lived there, a lifetime ago. All along the River Ruhr where housing gave way to forest, the countryside was beautiful and so lush. She had spent many hours walking through them in her youth.

If only she had possessed a camera back then, she thought, as she gazed at the scenery.

Now she only had her memories to fall back on.

Farmland (c) Jane Risdon 2012

Farmland (c) Jane Risdon 2012

She turned to her right and in a huge clearing the ruins of an old farmhouse stood, with roofless outbuildings and a side-less barn, which still held various decaying farm implements, such as a hay wagon made of wood and rusted metal, some sort of cutting machine which looked as if it had been cut in two, and a big old-fashioned rolling machine, which had two huge rusting drums attached to a long handle, which she thought must have been for flattening something once.

Rusting farm machinery (c) Jane Risdon 2012

Rusting farm machinery (c) Jane Risdon 2012

Making hay (c) Jane Risdon 2012

Across the fields (c) Jane Risdon 2012

An old tractor had been left with doors open and was now overgrown with weeds, and a young oak tree seemed to be sprouting from the driver’s seat, the leather rotted long ago. The tractor was similar to those used in the fields which rose high behind her grandparents’ home where she used to play as a child, long before combined harvesters, and real mechanisation had taken over farming.

When she was a child she used to run alongside Spangle, the local farm-hand, as he pulled various machinery for cutting hay, bundling it behind his rickety old tractor, and then she and her friends and siblings would help by stacking the square bales of hay. Sometimes they would make dens inside them, hidden from the world, where they would play for hours. No-one seemed to worry where they might be.

Deserted Farm (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Deserted Farm (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Other times she would collect eggs at the local farm, and take little lozenge-shaped pellets which had an oaty smell, to feed the cows as they were milked in the milking parlour, a million years away from the modern mechanised milking of cows she had seen on television programmes like ‘Country Ways,’ and ‘Country Tracks’, which even now she really enjoyed watching.

Often she would help the farmer and Spangle pick and collect the potatoes, when they were ready, and the smell of the earth in the lane reminded her of the smell as they harvested the potatoes. Later they would visit the farmer’s mother in the warm cosy farmhouse kitchen, and have a glass of homemade lemonade and hot newly baked biscuits or cakes.

The farmhouse has now been turned into a Harvester’s pub and restaurant, however, the original building seemed to be almost the way it was in her childhood, with obviously modern additions.

She had been once inside just to look around. It was a really strange feeling to stand in the bar, once the kitchen, and remember how it was back then. The huge fireplace had been retained, so had the low beams, and there were sepia photographs displayed of the original buildings and farm.

She had found it a very sad experience.

Sad for the house and the farm, and those she knew who had lived and worked there, and sad for herself; her lost childhood and her happy memories.

For the first time in years she wondered whatever had become of Spangle. He had slept in the big barn and had his meals in the farmhouse, but as far as she could recall, he had never had a proper home.

He must be dead long ago, she mused.

Sheep grazing (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Sheep grazing (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Somewhere in the distance she could hear sheep bleating and, following their cries, she could just about make out a flock high on a ridge to the left of the farm, where a field stretched into the distance. She wondered where the farm they belonged was located.

The farm next to her had long been abandoned, which had her wondering what had happened to cause it to be deserted, seemingly in a hurry, given what had been left behind. It must have been good working machinery back then, and the house would still have been habitable; a mystery which would remain unsolved unless she met someone she could ask.

She didn’t think she would, however.

The lane continued past the farm and became more and more overgrown until it was impossible to go further. She looked around deciding what to do; try and cross the field where the sheep were and take the faster route home, or go back the way she had come. Looking at her watch, she decided she had time to retrace her steps, enjoying the warm sunshine and the scenery.

A Walk to Destiny (c) Jane Risdon 2015

A Walk to Destiny (c) Jane Risdon 2015

She needed this walk to clear her mind and refresh her spirit. So far it seemed to be working.

The fresh air, warmth of the sun, and the beautiful scenery, filled her with a calm contentment and her fears, and anxieties, began to be absorbed into the peace and tranquillity that surrounded her.

Now she could think clearly and she stopped for a moment, listening to the sounds of nature around her.

She belonged here; in this place, in this time, in this skin. She had every right to exist just as the animals, the birds and vegetation around her had a right to this space and time. Bending down she touched a fern and recalled how ferns had been on this planet since the very beginning, and no doubt would be here long after she had gone. Long after he had gone.

He. He crept back into her consciousness, ruining the moment.

He. She took a deep breath and exhaled slowly through her mouth. She tasted the earth and the vegetation on the back of her throat and her resolve stiffened.

Looking around her she was filled with an overwhelming sense of self, of her ability to cope with anything, at last; courage. Courage to face what was to come, to face Him. She thrust her chest out and straightened her back and began to walk purposefully back along the lane.

The Lane (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Lane (c) Jane Risdon 2015

She reached the stile and hesitated for a second or two as she gazed along the lane on the other side. Somewhere deep down she knew, she felt, that once she crossed over the stile to the other side, there was no going back. She would have to carry on now that her mind was made up.

Whatever the outcome, there was no going back. The decision was made.

She mounted the stile and as she alighted on the other side,

she knew that ahead was her walk to destiny.

She felt strong.


Let me know what you think.



Flash Fiction Friday 093: Summer of Love by Jane Risdon

Jane Risdon:

 Just thought that as it is the Summer Solstice I would post this again.

It is a Flash Fiction piece I wrote

in 2013.

Hope you enjoy it.


Originally posted on MorgEn Bailey's Writing Blog:

Welcome to Flash Fiction Friday and the ninety-third piece in this series. This week’s is a 490-worder by Jane Risdon. This story will be podcasted in episode 30 (with three other stories) on Sunday 11th August.

Summer of Love

They swayed barefoot in time to the hypnotic music of Jefferson Airplane, multi-coloured kaftans flapping in the breeze, their hands high above their heads, eyes closed; the air thick with the sweet fragrance of weed.  All around couples lay on the grass embracing, smoking or just chilling in the hot summer sunshine. Babies slept and small children ran about, giggling, naked, just as drunk as everyone else on the joy of love and life.

The Love-In had been almost spontaneous, a version of Haight Ashbury under the huge shadows of Stonehenge, they’d come from everywhere; by transit vans covered in psychedelic art, by converted Bedford coaches, by motor-bikes with sidecars and…

View original 1,434 more words

I’m a Winner: Patti Phillips Picked Me

I’ve won two books from Patti Phillips

which arrived today.

All I had to do was make a comment on one of her posts!

She has sent me two books of my choice:

Cop Town by Karin Slaughter

Cop Town by Karin Slaughter

an author I love ,


a book by a new author for me,

Harm’s Reach

Harm's Reach by Alex Barclay


Alex Barclay

 which I am excited about reading.

Patti runs a fab website writing as the voice of a Detective, Charlie Kerrian,

Follow Kerrian’s blog – ‘Kerrian’s Notebook.’

Detective Charlie Kerrian solved the most important case of his life in One Sweet Motion.

Quitting was never an option.

Patti is an author in her own right.

Do check this page out as there is so much information there for Crime writers and readers

about Finger printing, forensics and so much more,

which is how I discovered Patti and her blog

when I was doing some research for Ms Birdsong Investigates

although her site caters mainly for the USA a great deal of information is relevant elsewhere.

Patti also runs

Night stand Book Reviews.

Nightstand Book Reviews is a site devoted to reviews of books that are great reads.

Under this umbrella are books written by bestselling authors as well as by debut novelists in both e-book and paper format.

Some are traditionally published authors and some are indies. 

If you write or read crime, then her sites are a must.

Patti has a Facebook Page too.

Thanks so much Patti, I am thrilled and so pleased you picked me

I can’t wait to read my books.

Jane x

He’s a Winner! Winning a set of 3 books in the Death series by L.W. Smith


to Peter Bouchier

Fireworks at Audley End House taken by Jane Risdon 2014 (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Fireworks at Audley End House taken by Jane Risdon 2014 (c) Jane Risdon 2014

the lucky winner of the 3 book set of

titles from

Crime writer and Blogger.

L.W. Smith

Laurie Smith Author and Blogger

L.W. Smith (a/k/a/ Laurie Smith)

Mountain of Death by L.W. Smith


Valley of Death

L.W. Smith: River of Death

L.W. Smith: River of Death

Thanks to everyone for taking part in the competition.

Better luck next time to those unfortunate not to win.

Enjoy your books Peter,

and do let us  know

(Laurie, me, and everyone following)

how much you enjoy them.

Thanks so much Laurie for being so generous in giving your books away in the competition.

Much appreciated.

Readers, and anyone interested in Laurie and his books, as well as his fab blog, which has the most wonderful photographs, alongside his writing,

please follow the links below.

 Laurie has hard copies of his books available for postage in Australia only, $16.00 plus P&H.

They’re also available on Amazon, see the links below: 



Twitter @L27wsmithSmith


Mountain of Death 

Valley of Death


Thanks everyone.  Catch up soon.



Win a set of three books from L.W. Smith’s DEATH series: read on

Laurie Smith Author and Blogger

Crime Author and Blogger Laurie Smith (a/k/a L.W. Smith)

is generously offering one set of three books from his

DEATH series

to someone who can answer this question correctly:

Annie Leeson is a uniformed Constable in Fortitude Valley.

Where is Fortitude Valley?

If you think you know and want a crack at winning this 3 book set

please send your answers via email to

Laurie Smith (a/k/a L.W. Smith)


Put ‘Jane Risdon’s Blog Competition’ in the subject line please.

Laurie will pick the winner.

For more information about Laurie and his amazing life, his wonderful books, and fab blog,

please see my interview with him

(click on my blog roll to read this post)

or follow this link:

Good luck one and all.

 Mountain of Death by L.W. Smith

Valley of Death

L.W. Smith: River of Death

L.W. Smith: River of Death

Laurie Smith (a/k/a L.W. Smith) is my Guest Author and Blogger today: Medium, Healer, Ex Army, Prison, Police and Defence Security – a fascinating Crime writer and Blogger

Laurie Smith Author and Blogger

Today I am very happy to be able to share the second of my Guest Author and Blogger features with you all.

Please welcome

Laurie Smith – also known as L.W. Smith

Crime writer and prolific blogger,

a Medium and Healer with former careers in the Army, Prisons, the Police, and Defence Security. 

Someone with a lot to say and what he has to say is enthralling.

His life experiences leave you breathless.

His writing is raw and real with no holds are barred. 

Sit back, strap yourself in and have a stiff drink on hand; you’re going to need it at the end of this ride.

Here goes:

Hi Jane, thanks for taking the time to promote my writing.

What this all boils down to is, I want to make people aware of my novels in the Death Series. I wish to sell to the masses, have the world-beating a deep and well-worn path to my door.

The last couple of years of blogging, for me have been reminiscent of a hack reporter at work, belting out copy for the reading public. Sweating blood into my trusty portable Remington Travel-Riter, it sounds better than keyboard. I have hopefully entertained and amazed my reading audience, and I might add the enjoyment from this labour of love on my part has been boundless.

My original intent for the blog was to promote the Death Series. Then I realised people want to be entertained.

In July 2012 I began A Policeman’s Lot. which ran for 18 weeks, at first a humorous look at the life of a copper. Then it became a little darker and somewhat philosophical.  

I followed up with A Turnkey’s Tribulations. This too had its moments of humour and pathos, with some insights into crime and punishment. 

Then, You’re in the Army Now. About my time in the Australian Army then quickly followed by,

A Medium, or just well done? Yes, I spent about 15 years working part-time as a psychic/medium and believe me there were plenty of stories to tell. On average for the four series, I’ve written about 215,000 words.

They may not be great words but they seem to have hit a chord amongst most of my followers.

The blogs aren’t in sequence; my careers ran like this, Army, Prison then Police taking up 20 years.

The remainder of my working life involved security with the defence department.

Security work in essence can be boring; this gave me time to study and work at one of the high points of my life, as a Medium and Healer.

Like most things I’ve done it had a use by date, I’ve since retired as a Medium, except for the occasional late night visit, or desperate call for help.  As to the healing aspect, I’m my biggest customer.

You may well ask, what have the above blogs to do with my novels?

Plenty! The old saying of write what you know rings true here.

My first novel, Mountain of Death burst into life from my time working in prison.

Mountain of Death by L.W. Smith

Whether you like it or not, jail rubs off on you.

I have a bulging storehouse of characters, all participating in a riot to get out and be noticed. 

“All right you lot, settle down or there’ll be no television tonight.” Sorry about that.

The story begins in Wacol jail with Jack Hardy on his last night inside. He’s done a hard 10 years for armed robbery, naturally he can’t sleep and we learn about the people and events that brought him there. If he thought doing a lagging was tough, then there are surprises in store for him when he gets out.

If you’ve read my army series you will note that Kings Cross, in Sydney became a second home for me.

Jack Hardy lived and worked there until a chance meeting with ex-jockey, Eddie Barnes changed their lives forever. Sydney in 1969 moved to a new beat.

It’s sleazy, dangerous heart, Kings Cross long known for crime and corruption had something new happening, R&R. It’s denizens, always eager to make a dollar looked upon the influx of the Yanks as sheep, ready for the shearing. Shear them they did, from the prostitutes and massage parlours, to the strip clubs, cafes and souvenir shops.

This story will lead you to places you wouldn’t normally visit.

There are no white hats and black hats; they’re mainly a grimy shade of grey. I haven’t had to invent the nastiness you’ll come across inside, it’s there on our nightly news or the front pages of daily newspapers.

By the time Jack hardy gets out of jail he’s a hardened criminal. When he comes up against Hans Draheim and his family he finds out what true degradation and evil entails.

This story isn’t all about crime, violence and sex.

There is an underlying ancient story at work here, that of the battle between good and evil. The players are human with all their foibles, faults and stories. The stage is the dark alleyways, dimly lit upstairs offices and jail cells.

You’ll get a taste of Australia, from Sydney to Adelaide and Broken Hill to the Gold Coast.

Like most young men Jack’s desires lead him to make decisions that older, more prudent men wouldn’t make. Women and the need to remove the taint of poverty from his life drive him onwards. These same needs lead to his downfall.

I suggest you follow the link to Amazon and see what readers have to say about it.

In 1981-82 I worked as a constable at Fortitude Valley, an inner Brisbane, riverside suburb.

Actually it’s a flow-on from the city and is known as Brisbane’s Kings Cross.

It has its entrenched gangs, sex clubs, nightclubs, drug dealers-runners and the like.

Its train station, and at the time interstate bus depot made it a terminus for runaway kids and crims on the run. An inordinate amount of street people, mental patients and the curious made for a mixed bag of humanity.

I also came up against official corruption, which to my mind is one of the worst crimes.

 Valley of Death is not an easy read; it would be if all of the victims were adults. Sadly they aren’t.

Valley of Death

In Australia the age of consent is 16 years old, so there isn’t much of an outcry when children that age and over are known to be addicts or sex workers.

Children as young as 10 and 11 make their homes in the streets. They don’t stay there too long, usually ending up in the clutches of perverts. They’re preyed on by drug dealers and find themselves living in small gangs.

Valley takes up 15 years after the gripping ending of Mountain.

Annie Leeson is a uniform constable at Fortitude Valley police station.

She’s young, with a head of bright, copper-red hair, attractive, bi-sexual and the adopted daughter of an ex-Detective Sergeant. Her life is complicated by her inherited wealth and the jealousy of others.

After her part in the conviction of a child rapist she finds herself working as a plain clothes officer, in the then, Juvenile Aid Bureau. Not convinced that the death of a street kid is an overdose, she begins to dig into the girl’s background and associates.

It leads to a group of paedophiles with international connections and no compunctions about removing nosy coppers. Some children die in this book, a sad thing yet it happens daily in every country.

Type child prostitution into Google and see what you come up with, unfortunately I didn’t need to.

I mentioned in an earlier post that I was rented out as a child on occasion. At the tender age of 9, I personally witnessed the murder of two small girls, victims of a group of perverts.

Perhaps that’s why I have no trouble writing about these events.

Their story, albeit slightly rearranged is there in the book, so perhaps they will now always be remembered.

It isn’t there in a gratuitous way, it does however fill in the antagonist’s back story.

You can’t have a character turn up on a page and be evil incarnate, he needs a starting point.

The characters develop and grow, beset with challenges of violence, death, love and family.

Annie, a broken, abused child herself, is taken to the brink and beyond and shows grit, determination and gives a glimpse into the strength and resilience of the human soul. 

I like to throw my people in the deep end of a pool, and then throw them a cinder block to hang onto.

River of Death is set once again in Fortitude Valley, south-east and northern Queensland, 5 years after the end of book 2.

L.W. Smith: River of Death

L.W. Smith: River of Death

Annie Leeson is back, a little older and a lot wiser.

She’s toughened up and doesn’t take crap off anyone.

Working out of Homicide, she finds herself seconded to the Valley after the discovery of a young woman’s body hanging in a shipping container.

We meet Simon Fynch, a new Detective on the block. He becomes the perfect foil for Annie. I can’t say too much here as it will spoil the endings of book 1 and 2.

Suffice to say you will find yourself in the mind of a perverted killer, on a downward spiral. Why does he prefer his victims to be young, pregnant, green-eyed red-heads?

A murderous prison escapee is also on the loose and Annie has more than herself to worry about. Blood is thicker than water and family connections are brought to the fore.

Needless to say, there is violence, death, sex and adventure, relationships are made and lost, and we say goodbye to some old friends and welcome new ones.

Cape of Death, is set mainly in Queensland’s Cooktown and Cape York Peninsular.

I’ve finished this book, I’m holding off for a few more months before releasing it to the clamouring public.

Annie is back, along with the team from River, investigating the deaths of several refugees and smugglers on a lonely beach.

The story takes us from Afghanistan via Indonesia and West Irian to the Cape.

As it unfolds you’ll find yourself alone, naked and terrified on a muddy rainforest track fleeing from horror to….?

Or perhaps you’re a wounded Taliban terrorist living alone in a cave, subsisting on wallabies and burning inside with revenge for mankind in general, while nature wreaks havoc outside.

You could be the Russian crime boss with a nose for gold, stolen Nazi gold and with no compunctions about who gets hurt in the process.

Jack is back big time here and leaves his mark as only he can.

There are: IED’s, big crocodiles, a murderous pair of bastards – Ipswich locals, who hunt more than wild pigs, a beautiful woman doctor with needs that only Annie can attend to, and a new Sydney crime boss from the Cross with an axe to grind.

Throw in a cyclone and a manhunt across the rugged north and I guarantee you’ll need a holiday afterwards… so you can read, Bay of Death. We move to Sydney for this story, I’ve nearly finished the first draft.

Set between Sydney and Thailand it deals with terrorism, biker gangs and arms smuggling. Annie is still with us and all I will say is, this book will re-invent her and I will also add, she’s bloody tough.

I have to make mention here that although I write about subjects that may be distasteful to some, I have to stay true to myself and write it as I see it.

Sometimes I’ll call a spade a spade, other times it’s a fucking shovel.

Since the beginning people have: loved, made love, lived, killed, enslaved, hurt and demeaned others.

You’ll find more than this in my books, you’ll find triumph over evil, family love, loyalty, justice, both natural and man-made, grief, happiness and up-liftment.

There’s physical pain and suffering, debasement and torture.

I have inserted a physic element into the series, usually through Annie’s troubled dreams.

There we have it, a little drum beating and flag waving, it also highlights what I said earlier….. Write what you know. 

For those who may be thinking what does he know about debasement and torture? I can assure you that I do.

Wow, what a life, what background for your books Laurie.

 Do your stories write themselves, or do you plan and outline in advance, every aspect about your character and their life and exploits?

I tend to write by the seat of my pants and often surprise myself with what turns up. I tried to plan my first book out, bad move. Had to start again after five chapters of rubbish, now I let the subconscious mind work it out. Apparently that’s its job.

Setting for a character and their story is important. What make you decide upon the setting you have chosen? Is the setting fictional or one you are familiar with?

I chose all of the main settings because of my familiarity with them. Either because I lived, visited or worked there. Keeping them mainly set in Australia is a bonus, because my readers here can identify with the locations. As to my overseas readers, well it will give them a taste of life down-under.

Is your life style similar to your character’s life style? Similar background/family/occupation/profession, education?

                               I share a common past to a degree with Annie as far as the abuse goes and being a police officer.

Other than that I’ve kept away from armed robberies.

Would you like to be one of your characters? What do you like/admire about them the most?

If I were a woman I’d like to be Annie. I admire her tenacity, dedication and strength of character.

What is the most dislikeable aspect of your character’s personality? If there is one.

I think other women are jealous of her and she has that tendency to be bitchy. But hey, who doesn’t?

 Tell us briefly about yourself and why you write, and why you write in this particular genre. What is your inspiration? What is your next project?

I’m retired from the workforce due to health reasons and basically write as a hobby. With my first two novels I wrote constantly, perhaps twelve hours a day, sometimes into the early hours of the morning. This is where retirement is good, you don’t have to get up and head off to work.

When I started on the third book I tended to be more restrained and worked about five hours a day. You may stop physically writing but your mind still plots, your characters vie for attention and you wake up at odd hours with, ah-ah moments.

To combat this I took up another hobby, photography. It definitely takes you away from writing, to the extent that I have to make sure I don’t replace one with the other.

I used to be inspired but now I’m not quite sure, all I know is I have two more books in the Death series to finish.

Cape of Death set in far north Queensland looking at the issue of terrorism, smuggling, bikie gangs etc.

This will be released later this year.

Bay of Death set in Sydney and South East Asia goes into domestic terrorism, plus a stand-alone novel.

Laurie, thanks so much for such an interesting  interview and for such  enlightening extracts from your work.

I hope my friends here will enjoy your Guest Blog as much as I have, and that they will leave their thoughts and comments for you here, and they’ll visit your blog and find out more about you and your books.

Meantime, I am sure you’ll find you need that stiff drink.

Many thanks, Jane.

Readers and anyone interested in Laurie and his books, as well as his fab blog which has the most wonderful photographs alongside his writing, please follow the links below.

 Laurie has hard copies of his books available for postage in Australia only, $16.00 plus P&H. They’re also available on Amazon, see the links below.


Twitter @L27wsmithSmith


Mountain of Death 

Valley of Death


Margot Kinberg is my Guest Author today: Mystery Author and Blogger

My Guest Author today is

Margot Kinberg

Margot Kinberg: Author, Blogger, and Assistant Professor

Margot Kinberg, Author, Blogger, and Assistant Professor

I thought it would be fun to invite authors I admire to write about the main characters from one of their books.

The character might feature in a series, or in just one book.

I wanted their creator to provide us with more insight into their chosen character; what makes them tick if you like.

So I asked them to write about

A Day in the Life

of their character.

Margot Kinberg

is a mystery novelist.

She is a prolific blogger with a very popular blog:

Confessions of a Mystery Writer

She is also an Assistant Professor

and she is the creator of

Joel Williams.

Margot has been a great support to writers like myself, and when she asked for writers to contribute to an anthology she was putting together  in memory of her friend, crime writer, editor, and blogger Maxine Clarke, called In A Word: Murder, and agreed to take two of my Short Stories, I was thrilled and honoured.

In  Word: Murder was published in 2013

Anthology of Crime Stories

Anthology of Crime Stories

Margot has published two other novels in addition to her academic publications.

B – Very Flat published in 2010

B-Very Flat (2010)


Publish or Perish published in 2008

Publish or Perish 2008

Here is Margot answering some questions I put to her about her sleuth, and telling us about

A Day in the Life of Joel Williams

and other facts:

Margot, I thought it would be fun to invite you to write about a day in the life of one of your main characters with some details about them as a person, which your reader may or may not be aware about.  Let us know what makes them tick, what makes their creator (you) invest so much time and effort in their stories.

Thank you so much for hosting me, Jane! It’s an honour. It’s a privilege too to share a bit about my sleuth Joel Williams

How does your character’s day usually begin? Let us know how your character might spend a typical day.

Joel is a former police detective-turned-university professor – he teaches courses in criminal justice – so he has quite a full life. If there is such a thing as a typical day in academia, Joel usually starts it early. He is owned by a mixed-breed dog named Oscar, who doesn’t like to wait long for his morning run and breakfast. Once those are done, Joel gets ready and goes to his office at Tilton University. On some days, he teaches several class sessions; on others he works with his advisees. And there are of course committees, meetings and other university obligations as well. He also tries to make sure to fit in time to work on his own writing (more about that a bit later). After the workday ends, Joel goes home to dinner (unless he has a university function). Then in the evening there are always papers to read, lessons to plan and the like. It is a busy life, but Joel likes working with young people who are planning criminal justice careers.

Does your character juggle a career and a family? If they have either/both, does their career drive them to the detriment of everything else, home life for example?

Joel is happily married to Laura, who’s an Assistant District Attorney. She’s got a busy life of her own, but both are committed to staying together. So they try to have dinner together as often as they can and set aside time for each other. And once a week (Saturday night) is Date Night for them. They don’t have children, although both would have liked to be parents. But if you ask them to be honest, they’ll tell you that maybe it’s just as well, since they’re both passionate about their work. They know the consequences of ‘absentee parenting.’

Does your character have a love interest? How does this ‘interest’ impact his/her story?

Joel loves Laura very much, and depends on her insights when he’s investigating. They met while he was still a cop and she was in law school. They found quickly that they were compatible and the rest is, as they say, history. They don’t always agree on things, but Laura serves as an important ‘sounding board.’

When you first envisaged your character, did you have their whole life mapped out?

Not to the last detail, no. I had some of the basics mapped out, because I wanted Joel to seem more believable. But I didn’t sketch in each thing. I’m hoping to add more in future novels.

Does your character have political views? Strong views about controversial topics for example? Perhaps you steer clear of involving your character in strong viewpoints, being vocal about them – why?

Joel’s political views aren’t an important part of the series, so I wouldn’t say they’re controversial. He is somewhat of a social liberal with working-class roots. But his years as a cop have also taught him some hard lessons about taking any political view too far.

Right now, Joel is working on a book about juvenile crime in the US, and his research has a focus on working with young delinquents. That topic is always a difficult one, as there aren’t really pat answers. He’s hoping that he’ll be able to make some proposals for a solid system of working with young offenders in a way that supports them, but also protects others. None of it’s easy, though.

Do you think your character’s views might alienate then in some way from their readers, or perhaps stimulate their interest in the character even more, even though their views and opinions might be worlds apart from their own? Are you worried about writing anything too controversial?

I don’t worry too much about writing things that might be too controversial. My thinking is, if a character is well-rounded and interesting, readers can appreciate the character even if they don’t agree with her or his views.

What made you decide upon the physical attributes of your character? Are they the amalgamation of several people you know, or have you created this person from scratch? Your perfect man/woman for example – someone you might/might not care for if you met them in real life?

I actually began with the kind of person Joel is, and imagined what he might look like from that. I can’t say he’s an amalgamation or an ideal.

What made you decide upon their personality/character? Was their profession or personality the driving force behind you creating them? Are they a music fan? Which genre and why? Do they read? Which authors and why? Add anything like this which helps us get to know something about your character.

I wanted to create a character who was mature, but at the same time, willing to learn. So I decided Joel would be in his 50’s, and a professional student (i.e. an academic). He was, as I said, a cop (for fifteen years), but he could see himself ‘burning out.’ So he decided to take his interest in criminal justice in a different direction. That’s what eventually led him to his present work. He has had to learn to think like a scholar, but I like it that he’s open to that learning. He does read, but he’s not the passionate reader that I am. He enjoys music (mostly classic rock) and microbrewery beer. He goes to the gym a couple of times a week and sometimes runs. It’s not so much that he has ‘fitness mania,’ but he does want to keep in shape.

What are your character’s flaws/faults or failings? You’ve created them with these, why was that? Did you want a perfect all rounded lead character or a flawed one? Are they kind and caring or a bully, arrogant, cruel….?

Joel’s a good guy, but he’s not perfect. He loses his patience when he has to wait on ‘hold,’ sit in traffic and so on. He generally manages it, but not always with good grace. He’s also not particularly gifted at getting the bureaucratic paperwork of university life done. He didn’t care much for that as a cop, either. He’s rather get right to the point and get things done, and that’s not always possible. He’s mellowed a little over time, but patience is sometimes hard for him.

Does your character convey a moral message or aren’t you bothered about that sort of thing?

I didn’t create Joel with the idea of a moral message in mind. He has his share of beliefs, but I don’t really have an agenda as I write.

Who is your character (not just their name) but who are they as a person? Why did you create him/her? What drove you to make them the way you have?

I think the best way to describe Joel is to say that he’s an ordinary, everyday guy who tries to do the right thing as best he can. And that’s really what motivates him: setting things right. It’s what sparks his curiosity, and it’s what makes him work to find out the truth about a case. He doesn’t let things go because he wants to fix things, even though he knows that not everything can be fixed.

If your character could ask their creator (you) to alter any aspect of their character/personality what do you think it would be, knowing what you know about them now that you have got to live with them for some time?

I think Joel would ask me to make him a little more meticulous. He’s organized enough, but he would probably like it if he were better at the minutiae of paperwork and record-keeping.

Which experience in your character’s life/career has been the most surprising to you, their creator? Even though you wrote this, it may have been a surprise to you when the idea popped into your head (or not).

In Publish or Perish, Joel acquires Oscar the mutt. He didn’t really strike me as the kind to be owned by a dog, but that’s what happened.

Does your story write itself or do you plan and outline in advance, every aspect about your character and their life and exploits? Was this difficult to write, especially if it was not part of your ‘plan’ for them originally?

I do some advance planning. I like to know the general direction that a story is taking, so I do outline it. But I don’t sketch in each detail, because I want to leave room for good ideas, changes, and the little surprises that make a story (hopefully!) more interesting.

Setting for a character and their story is important. What made you decide upon the setting you have chosen? Is the setting fictional or one you are familiar with?

I chose the higher education setting very deliberately. It’s a context I’m quite familiar with, and I thought I could tell a believable university story. Besides, campuses are often lovely places with lots of stories, both ‘out there’ and hidden. So lots of grist for the proverbial mill.

 Is your life style similar to your character’s life style? Similar background/family/occupation/profession, education?

I’m in higher education as Joel is, and we have the same views about some things. But we have our differences. First off, course, we’re opposite sexes. And he’s got a slightly harder edge than I think I do, because of what he saw as a cop. He and I both care very much about our students, and we both want to do the right thing. But I think I’m a bit more meticulous than he is, and he’s better at multi-tasking than I am.

Would you like to be your character? What do you like/admire about them the most?

Interesting question! I admire Joel. I admire his tenacity and his commitment to doing the right thing. I like him, too. But I’m not sure I would want to be him. He’s not what you’d call ‘demon-haunted.’ But I don’t think I’d want his memories from his years on the police force. He’s seen some awful things.

What is the most dislikeable aspect of your character’s personality? If there is one.

I’ll be candid here. I wanted to create a character who’d be likeable. So Joel doesn’t have a lot of disagreeable traits (‘though he’s hardly perfect). Probably it’d be better to say he can be irritating, the way anyone can. I don’t think I’d want to be with him in a car when the traffic is stopped for a long time…

Please write a little about your recent book/story involving your character and why he/she is experiencing what is happening to them in this particular story. Is your character in a series? List all your books featuring this person.

Joel is in a series, which so far includes Publish or Perish, B-Very Flat, Dying to See You and (tentative title) Past Tense. In Past Tense, he investigates a 40-year-old murder when a skeleton is found in the ground where a new campus building is going up. This death ends up being connected with a present-day killing, and when Joel discovers that body (not a pleasant moment for him) he knows that someone has gotten away with murder for a long time…

Tell us briefly about yourself and why you write, and why you write in this particular genre. What is your inspiration? What is your next project?

I write because I have stories to tell that just won’t leave me in peace until I tell them. I also write because I must admit I love the act of creating stories and the characters that people them. The process of writing isn’t always fun, but writing itself is a real passion for me. I write crime fiction because that’s the genre that I like best as a reader. I’ve been reading mysteries since I was a child, and I feel a real connection. Besides that, crime fiction lets me explore all sorts of aspects of the human experience. There’s love, loss, grief, hope, adventure, and so much more in crime fiction – much more than there is space for me to describe.

 Margot, thanks so much for taking the time to answer my questions and for enabling us to get a good insight into your character Joel Williams.  I hope this has introduced you and your writing to many new readers, and that your many fans will find this informative and interesting.  I know I have.  What makes writers conjure up a character and stick with him has always intrigued me.   You have managed to allow us into the world  your writing and Joel Williams and helped answer this for us today.

It has been such a thrill having you here.  Thanks so much.


Margot Kinberg is a mystery novelist (she writes the Joel Williams series) and Associate Professor. She has also been blogging about crime fiction since 2009. She has written three Joel Williams novels and is currently revising the fourth. She is also editor of the crime fiction anthology In a Word: Murder. Margot blogs at Confessions of a Mystery Novelist.






Amazon Author

Google Plus

Birthday Bash Part Two: Thomas Becket, Eastbridge Hospital, and Pilgrimage

Canterbury Cathedral (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Canterbury Cathedral (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Part Two of my belated birthday bash as promised.

As you may or may not be aware, in addition to my love of writing, reading, archaeology, astronomy, and the sciences, I have a passion for history which I share with my siblings, and one in particular, my youngest brother. 

My youngest brother and his partner spoiled me rotten during a fantastic weekend spent with them celebrating my belated birthday.

Part One of my birthday bash found me having a look around Canterbury Cathedral with a special treat;

seeing the tomb of a family ancestor, William Warham, Archbishop of Canterbury (1503-1532).

I wrote about our visit to Canterbury Cathedral last time, and I posted photos I took.

William Warham Archbishop of Canterbury 1503-1532 (c) Jane Risdon 2015

William Warham Archbishop of Canterbury 1503-1532 (c) Jane Risdon 2015

We had a fab time wandering around Canterbury, especially the pubs which my brother made a point of taking me in to. 

Those buildings with history and character attached to them, not just because we fancied a drink; 

though we tasted the local ciders too; yummy!

He is a font of knowledge when it comes to places of historical interest. He can tell you where famous people lived or worked, which pubs or restaurants they visited, where they wrote their books or painted, or made a discovery.

  Going anywhere with him is especially fun.  He always manages to find places off the beaten track few know about –

He’s always informative and makes every trip out so very interesting. 

As you know we visited the spot where St. Thomas Becket was murdered on 29th December 1170 in Canterbury Cathedral.  Almost immediately his tomb and the scene of his death became a focus of pilgrimage, and the city therefore found it had to provide accommodation for the large numbers of visitors drawn there.

Chantry Chapel of Our Lady (Eastbridge Hospital) (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Chantry Chapel of Our Lady (Eastbridge Hospital) (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Eastbridge Hospital was founded to meet those needs.

13th century mural (refectory at Eastbridge) (c) Jane Risdon 2015

13th century mural (refectory at Eastbridge) (c) Jane Risdon 2015

We were luck in having the whole place to ourselves as we wandered around.  It was difficult to take photos – they asked that flash was not used which made taking any photos difficult in the gloom.  But I managed a few which I hope you enjoy.

Although there isn’t any firm evidence for the founding date of the hospital, it is most likely, according to records, to have been in existence since about 1176.  Ralph, nephew of Becket, was probably the first Master.

From gifts of lands and money, the Hospital soon became rich, but then it fell out of use after about 150 years.

The Undercroft (Eastbridge Hospital) (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Undercroft (Eastbridge Hospital) (c) Jane Risdon 2015

It was refounded in 1342 by Archbishop Stratford, and was at its peak in the 1380s when Chaucer was writing his Cantebury Tales.

In the Reformation following the rift between Henry V111 and the Church of Rome, monasteries and places of pilgrimage came under government control, and many were sold off to the rich. 

In 1538, the shrine to St. Thomas was destroyed and the Hospital went into decline,

but in 1584 Archbishop Whitgift made reforms which were protected by Act of Parliament.

The Hospital began to provide accommodation for ten poor people of Canterbury and pay a dole to ten more.

Original  ceiling beams in Eastbridge Hospital (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The complex structure of oak beams in the ceiling is called a bell cage, and the sanctus inside was cast in 1727 – Eastbridge Hospital (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Shelter and care for wounded soldiers passing through Canterbury also had to be provided, and the school for twenty boys, which had been founded in 1569, was maintained, and stayed open until 1880.

The Undercroft  was the Pilgrims’ sleeping area and the dividing walls form the cubicles in which they slept, possibly in pairs.

Inside the vestibule and chapel at Eastbridge Hospital (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Inside the vestibule and chapel at Eastbridge Hospital (c) Jane Risdon 2015

In 1332 Archbishop Stratford restated the aims of the Hospital as being ‘for the maintenance of poor pilgrims and other infirm persons resorting thither to remain until they are healed of their infirmities; for the poor, for persons going to Rome, for others coming to Canterbury and needing shelter, and for the lying-in of women.’

Today Eastbridge as an Almshouse continues to give a home and support to a group of people of varying needs.

We spent a lovely day in Canterbury even though the weather was cold and there was a slight drizzle.

Do visit The Hospital of St Thomas the Martyr in Eastgbridge (Canterbury) if you ever get chance.  It is well worth it.

The next part of my birthday gift was to follow the next day, Sunday.  

This was a secret which was kept right up until the moment I took my seat somewhere special. 

In my next blog I will reveal where they took me. 

I would never had guessed in a million years where I was going.

I look forward to sharing it with you soon.  Thanks for being here.  Have a fab week.

As always all photos are (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Vestibule and Chantry Chapel Eastbridge Hospital) (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Vestibule and Chantry Chapel Eastbridge Hospital) (c) Jane Risdon 2015                   

Plain Brown Paper Bags, Life Gets in the Way and My Writing Journey: I am guesting today

It’s busy for me today.  I am Guest Blogger on two blogs:

Today Part three of my regular guest blog over on Creative Frontiers is live:

The Auditions in Hollywood for the Super Star Singer’s Touring Band have been in full swing,

so you’ve got to wonder why the drummer is in urgent need of

a plain brown paper bag…

Find out what happens next over on Creative Frontiers:

Brown Kraft Paper Counter Bags, 7 x 7

Do leave me a comment on CF and on here if you are kind enough to visit.

I hope it makes you laugh.

 Many thanks.

If you need to refresh or want to read Parts One and Two from scratch, then follow the links to:

Snore Poison so I’ll Remember it…


The Auditions…


I Must Have A Criminal Mind…


I am also Guest Author talking to Jenny Kane over on her blog today:


You can read

Life Gets in the Way

 over on

Do pop over and let Jenny and me know what you think by leaving her a comment there, and one for me here also. 

As always, much appreciated.

I hope you enjoy it – it was fun talking to her.


In addition to these interviews I am also a Guest with

Susan Finlay

over on her blog

talking about

My Writing Journey

Do pop in and say hello.

Your visit, as ever, is much appreciated.  Thanks so much.

Chat again soon

Jane xx

I am hosting The Grand Callaway Blog Tour – Meet Barbara Freethy: #1 New York Times and USA Today bestselling author

Meet #1 New York Times and USA Today best-selling Author: 

Barbara Freethy

who is my guest today.

 Barbara talks writing, publishing, and finding balance, plus gives her advice for new authors…

Check out what she has to say then read on for more information about this blog tour and all its great prizes!

 Barbara Freethy talks strong women, hot guys and family series…

Barbara Freethy, Author of the Calloways

Barbara Freethy, Author of the Callaways

she has been making up stories most of her life.

Growing up in a neighborhood with only boys and a big brother who was usually trying to ditch her, she spent a lot of time reading.

When she wasn’t reading, she was imagining her own books.

After college and several years in the P.R. field, she decided to try her hand at a novel. 

Now Barbara is a #1 New York Times and USA Today bestselling author loved by readers all over the world. 

Her novels range from contemporary romance to romantic suspense and women’s fiction.

The Callaway series

The Callaway series

Here’s what Barbara told me about her series and her writing:

 One of my favorite quotes of all time is by Eleanor Roosevelt: “A woman is like a tea bag.

You don’t know how strong she is until you put her in hot water.”

Goodness me!  Why?

 This quote perfectly describes the heroines in my new connected family series: The Callaways.

I love to write about ordinary women who get caught up in extraordinary adventures.

My heroines don’t always know what they’re made of until they’re tested.

True.  I think many women would agree with this.

 While we sometimes associate strong female characters with over-the-top roles like vampire slayer or some other kick-ass profession, I believe most women, even the quiet ones, have a superhuman core of strength that enables them to change the world they live in and also to change the men who love them.

In my books, the heroine’s strength is enhanced, not only by a new and powerful romantic relationship but also her personal journey to find herself.

Tell me more…


In the first book in the Callaway series, ON A NIGHT LIKE THIS, the heroine, Sara, has grown up in a troubled family and is estranged from her father. She grew up next door to the chaotic, fun-loving Callaway family and often envied the relationships she saw on the other side of the fence. She also had a huge crush on the second oldest male in the family, Aiden Callaway.

 While Sara was a studious, serious girl in high school, Aiden was the charming rebel. As teenagers they were not ready for each other, but now they meet again as adults and both are facing pivotal moments in their lives.

 Do go on…

Aiden is recovering from an injury he acquired as a smokejumper and grieving for the loss of his best friend, who died during their last jump together. Sara has come home to repair the relationship with her father, only to discover that there are family secrets that will change everything she thought she knew about her past and her parents.

I’m sure we can all relate to that…

 Sara has to find the strength within herself to risk her heart on a man who could quite possibly break it, to face a terrible lie and to find a way to forgive her father.

Aiden also has to find a way to deal with the secret that took his friend’s life. Together these two characters find strength within themselves and also draw strength from each other, which is, really, what love is all about.

As a reader, what do you like to read about?

 As a reader, I love books that have layers: romance, mystery, adventure and surprises. As a writer, I strive to bring those same elements to all of my stories. My heroines have to be as strong as the heroes. And I always hope that they inspire my readers in some way, too.

 I grew up reading books about strong female characters, and I know those reading experiences helped shaped some of my own attitudes about the kind of woman I wanted to be.


Tell us something about your writing:

You’re an icon in—not just the indie publishing community—but the publishing community in general. Your success is something to which we all aspire. In your opinion, what has been the greatest contributing factor to the success of your novels?  

There are so many factors that contribute to a successful writing career and it’s hard to say which ones are the most important,

but I do believe that publishing frequently helps to build an audience and also momentum.

I don’t write as quickly as some authors do or as slow as others; I think I’m somewhere in the middle. But I try to put out 3-4 books a year and I think that helps keep my books in front of the readers. I also write what I love to read. Sometimes that means my books are not part of the hot trend of the moment, but that’s okay. I think it’s a mistake to try to chase fads. They blow out as quickly as they blow in. And, finally, I look at writing as my career. I work hard at it. I spend a lot of vacations at my computer.

But it’s a really rewarding career, so it’s all worth it!   

 writing and publishing books is not a business for the faint of heart. You have to be a risk taker. You have to be willing to speculate on your income and to be able to live through the slow times.

You have to develop a thick skin, because rejection is everywhere: agents, publishers, reviewers, readers… We all know that books are subjective. But if you’re up for the task, writing can be an awesome career choice!

When did you start writing your very first novel, and did it ever get published? How has the world of writing change since you started out?

I wrote my first book when I was pregnant with my second child, who is now a young adult. It was eventually published as a Silhouette romance titled Promise of Marriage under the pen name Kristina Logan.

The writing world has gone completely upside down and spun around a dozen times since I wrote my first book, but it’s an amazing time to be a writer now. There are so many opportunities for writers to get their books to the reading public. I’m thrilled for the writers who are starting out now, whether they want to be traditionally published or publish themselves. There’s more work. There are more changes. But there are also many more opportunities.

 Technology has brought many changes to the world of books, but readers continue to embrace new books, new formats, and—at the heart of every book—great stories. I don’t think great stories will ever go out of style.

 What advice do you have for authors who are either aspiring to write their first book or are working overtime to try to get that book noticed?

For writers working on their first book, the most important thing you can do is write all the way to the end.

Too many new writers get hung up in the middle or caught up in rewriting the beginning over and over again. To get over the hump, jump ahead in the story or just write something—anything—knowing you can fix it during the editing process.

Until you write to the end, you don’t know what you don’t know. You have to experience the entire process of writing a novel. It takes dedication, determination and stamina to finish a book. But it’s hugely gratifying, and there’s no better experience than the actual writing.

 For those writers who have published their first book and are working overtime to get it noticed, I would caution against spending all your time promoting that first book.

What you really need to do is write the second book and then the third. You have to look at your writing as a career. More books will increase your audience faster than any amount of marketing you do. I urge an 80-20 split: 80% of your time should be spent writing and 20% on promotion.

Describe your writing process. Are you a plotter, a pantser, or something in between?

 I am closer to being a pantser than a plotter, but I do always know at least the five main plot points of my story before I begin writing. But part of the fun for me as a writer is telling myself the story.

I want to be inspired and surprised as I go along. It makes it more interesting to me. Of course, I would be able to write faster if I outlined, but it just isn’t the way my brain works. There’s no right way to write, just the right way for the individual author.

 What was your reaction when you first found out you broke onto the New York Times and USA Today bestsellers’ lists? How did you celebrate?

Hitting #1 on the New York Times with my novel SUMMER SECRETS was an amazing moment, especially because it was my first self-published title.


I celebrated with a lovely dinner out with my husband.

What was even more astonishing was that the novel stayed on the NYT list for 5 weeks and since then I’ve had 19 more novels hit both USA Today and the New York Times. It never gets old!

How do you find balance between writing, publishing, and promoting your books and the rest of your life? Any tips for the rest of us?

I have no balance whatsoever at the moment! I do try to do something in the world of exercise—take a walk or play tennis at least 3-4 times a week. And I also try to refill the creative well by reading and watching movies and television. Inspiration comes from everywhere, sometimes a song on the radio, a person that walks by, a sign on the road… I think it’s important for writers to be out in the world, because all our experiences provide the fabric for our stories!

Congrats on your groundbreaking, new partnership with Ingram to get the paperback editions of the Callaways out to the world. What about this opportunity has you most excited?

I’m thrilled to be able to bring my bestselling digital titles into print and have the books sold at physical bookstores throughout the country. Partnering with Ingram Publisher Services has allowed me to use their national sales team and distribution system to sell my books into Target, Barnes and Noble, airport bookstores and supermarket chains.

I know that some readers still love their print books, so I want my readers to be able to read my books in whatever format they prefer. Until very recently print has been under the control of large publishing houses, but now print readers will have an opportunity to get titles by an Indie author, and I think it’s a game changer for the publishing industry.

The Calloway Book Tour - Barbara Freethy

The Calloway Book Tour – Barbara Freethy

Barbara, thanks so much for being my guest and for sharing so much about yourself and your writing with us here.  I am sure plenty of readers will rush to try to win these generous prizes and, like me, other authors have really enjoyed reading about your writing and path to success.  Congratulations.

About the Callaway Blog Tour & All Its Great Prizes!

This is the week you finally meet the Callaways! Not only are they all over the web as part of their extraordinary blog tour, but they are also out and about in your neighborhood. That’s right; we’re celebrating the print launch with Ingram by throwing a party all over the world! Make sure to follow this tour closely for your chance to win gift cards, swag, autographed books, and other incredible prizes.

All the info you need to join the fun and enter to win amazing prizes is RIGHT HERE. Remember, winning is as easy as clicking a button or leaving a blog comment—easy to enter; easy to win!

To Win the Prizes:

  1. Purchase any of the Callaway novels by Barbara Freethy (optional)
  2. Enter the Rafflecopter contest on Novel Publicity (go here)
  3. Visit today’s featured social media event (that’s where the HUGE prizes are)

About The Callaways: The Callaways were born to serve and protect! In Barbara’s new connected family series, each of the eight siblings in this blended Irish-American family find love, mystery and adventure, often where they least expect it! Each book stands alone, but for the full enjoyment of the series, you might want to start at the beginning with On A Night Like This! Get the eBooks via AmazonBarnes & NobleiBooks, or Kobo.

Check out her Goodreads page:

About the Author: Learn more on her websiteFacebook page, or in her Street Team.






Belated Birthday Bash: Part 1 – The Black Prince and an Archbishop

Canterbury Cathedral (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Canterbury Cathedral (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Last weekend I had a couple of wonderful surprise birthday treats.

I’ll share my experiences with you and I hope you enjoy the photos and snippets to go with them.

My youngest brother organised this one – the other treats will follow next time.

The first of which was a fab day out at Canterbury Cathedral where one of our ancestors was once Archbishop of Canterbury and the last pre-reformation Archbishop.

William Warham Archbishop of Canterbury

William Warham Archbishop of Canterbury (c) Jane Risdon 2015

His name was William Warham (1503-1532)

Archbishop Warham (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Last Pre-reformation Archbishop William Warham 1503-1532 (c) Jane Risdon 2015

We spent a number of hours looking around the Cathedral which is a World Heritage Site.

in AD 597 missionaries from Rome converted the King of Kent to Christianity.

Augustine, leader of the mission, was consecrated as Archbishop and his cathedra (official seat) was established at Canterbury.

The Cathedral has been the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury ever since.

Archbishop William Warham (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Archbishop William Warham (c) Jane Risdon 2015

In 1170 Archbishop Thomas Becket was murdered in the Cathedral and, when soon afterwards miracles were said to take place it became one of Europe’s most important pilgrimage centres.

Thomas Becket was slain here in 1170 (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Thomas Becket was slain here in 1170 (c) Jane Risdon 2015

King Henry 11 is said to have exclaimed ‘Who will rid me of this turbulent priest’ following a long-lasting dispute.

Four knights set off for Canterbury and murdered Thomas – the place is now called the Martyrdom.

Thomas Becket's Pavement in Trinity Chapel since 1220 (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Thomas Becket’s Pavement in Trinity Chapel since 1220 (c) Jane Risdon 2015

 The original tomb of Thomas Becket was housed in  the Eastern Crypt from 1170-1220 when it was moved to Trinity Chapel, which was destroyed on the orders of Henry III in 1538 (Becket’s cult was one that questioned the King’s supremacy in Church matters).  The Pavement above was prepared for repositioning of the shrine in 1220 – a candle burns on the spot of the original tomb.

The spot where Thomas Becket was murdered. (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The spot where Thomas Becket was murdered. (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Trinity Chapel houses the tombs of King Henry IV and Edward, Prince of Wales known as ‘The Black Prince.’

The Black Prince died 1376.  the gilded effigy shows him in full armour and gauntlets including spurs which he won at the Battle of Crecy, his dog and helmet.

The Black Prince (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Black Prince (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Black Prince - copies of his funeral 'achievements' - (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Black Prince – copies of his funeral ‘achievements’ – (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The shields on the tomb for the first time show the three     ostrich feathers of peace which are still referred to as ‘The Prince of Wales Feathers.’

There is a Huguenot Chapel originally  The Black Prince’s Chantry, here he expected to be buried, but his tomb is in a place of honour in the Trinity Chapel. Queen Elizabeth 1 gave this chapel to the refugee French Protestant Huguenots, who first fled to Britain over 400 years ago, and again in the late 17th century when persecuted by Louis I.  Services are still held every Sunday and we noticed quite a few French visitors going into the chapel whilst we were looking around.

Facing the Warriors’ Chapel of St Michael is the ship’s bell of HMS Canterbury, it rings out at 11am on weekdays signalling prayers commemorating the dead of both World Wars and other recent conflicts – we heard it and we stood to listen to the 5 minute service.

In the Warriors' Chapel many of the old colours of the Buffs (Royal East Kent) Regiment, now called The Princess of Wales' Royal Regiment. (c) Jane Risdon 2015

In the Warriors’ Chapel many of the old colours of the Buffs (Royal East Kent) Regiment, now called The Princess of Wales’ Royal Regiment. (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The tomb of Lady Margaret Holland with her two husbands, John Beaufort, Earl of Somerset (on the left) and Prince Thomas Plantagenet, Duke of Clarence, on the right. The chapel was rebuilt by Lady Margaret just before she died in 1439.

The tomb of Lady Margaret Holland with her two husbands and is housed in the Chapel of St Margaret (The Warriors' Chapel) (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The tomb of Lady Margaret Holland with her two husbands and is housed in the Chapel of St Margaret (The Warriors’ Chapel) (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Cathedral houses some of the earliest examples of stained glass in the Britain.

Stained glass windows. (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Stained glass windows. (c) Jane Risdon 2015

 We spent a wonderful day wandering around the Cathedral, we arrived early so we wee lucky to avoid the crowds of tourists who gradually filled the Cathedral and the town a little later.  My brother has been before so he knew where to visit first.  Unfortunately in the Crypt photographs were not allowed.

Which is such a shame as some of the most interesting tombs and architecture was down there.

The Crypt (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The Crypt (c) Jane Risdon 2015

More photos taken during our visit.

The wonderful ceiling (c) Jane Risdon 2015

The wonderful ceiling (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Graffiti from 1668 (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Graffiti from 1668 (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Huge Pillars (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Huge Pillars (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Altar (c) Jane Risdon

Altar (c) Jane Risdon


Next time I will share some photos of another lovely place we visited: Eastbridge Hospital and also Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club where my brother and his partner took me for a very special event,  where I got to hear the songs of one of my all time favourite artists and performers.

I hope you will pop back then.

Meantime thanks so much for taking trip around Canterbury Cathedral with me.  I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did.

The grounds are well worth a visit, and so is the town.

As always please be aware these photos and content are (c) Jane Risdon 2015.

Canterbury Cathedral general visiting times:

Summer 9am-5.30pm

Winter 9am-4.30pm

(limited at times of services)

Disability access, guided tours, shopping available.

Cloisters (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Cloisters (c) Jane Risdon 2015

Snore Poison so I’ll remember it….the first instalment of my new regular music blog

Today my very first regular music blog post is live over on

Creative Frontiers

where I shall be writing a short piece – 300-500 words – each month,

sharing some of my experiences in the Music Business.

Today you can read the first instalment about two British musicians

invited to audition for an American super-star and his touring band,

and what they got up to.

Warwicxk Rockbass Corvette

If you pay a visit to the blog please leave me your comments there

and also pop back here and let me know what you think. 

 Part one is called:

Snore Poison, so I’ll remember it….

I do hope you will have a blast.

I had a lot of fun recalling the events.  Part two is to follow soon.


I’ve been blogging for three years this week.

3 Year Anniversary Achievement

Yesterday marked the third anniversary of my blog here.

How time flies when you are having fun – and I’ve had lots of fun.

I’ve met some wonderful people on-line and enjoy ‘chatting’ to them;

 it is the highlight of my day.

Ideas take form (c) Jane Risdon 2012

Enjoyable times (c) Jane Risdon 2012

Peoples from around the world share their thoughts and comments with me (and everyone), and I’ve had my eyes opened to all manner of new authors, new books, photographers, and other bloggers with interesting and creative sites which I love visiting.

Global Friends

I just want to thank each and every one of you who has been kind enough to visit, follow, and comment on my posts.

Your input is so essential and most welcome.

I have also learned so much from getting to know you all.

Bridge to where?  (c) Jane Risdon 2013

Bridge to a Global Village  (c) Jane Risdon 2013

The global village is indeed a source of information, education and new friendships.

I love it.

Thank you so much.

With your help I hope I can continue for another three years.

Might amuse you

January turned into a busy month: bopping and blogging

January turned into a busy month.

I agreed to write an article for Fireback Records.

 The record label has a new blog on their website featuring all manner of useful tips and articles for song writers and musicians.

Photo courtesy of Fireback Records

My first article for Fireback Records,  The Art of Song Writing, was published January 15th and can be found via this link

They’ve invited me to contribute to their blog regularly and, you never know, I may well be posting more articles in the near future.

I think you will spot the similarities between writing stories and writing songs.

Let me know what you think by leaving the record company a comment on the post, as well as leaving me one here.

I was also interviewed by Creative Frontiers (Martin West) on 21st January and you can find the interview via this link

Logo Courtesy of Creative Frontiers

He posed some interesting questions about my writing which I enjoyed answering no end.

Feedback is always appreciated so do please join the others who’ve left their comments on his blog, and on mine.

On February 1st I was Guest Author on Neal James’ website blog where Neal kindly posted an extract from


which is one of my short stories included in the anthology, In A Word: Murder

(c) Jane Risdon 1991

When British Rock band Dreamer is about to sign their first major deal with a successful record company, who’ve lined up a big hitting American manager, things get heavy.

Big money is coming their way with huge advances and potentially massive song writing royalties,

and soon who wrote what, becomes deadly important.

The link to Neal James’ blog is

If you pop over and read it please let him know what you think, and me of course.

To buy In A Word: Murder

Out in Paperback 14th February 2014 on and

Out in Paperback 14th February 2014 on and

where you can also read Dreamer

and my other story, Hollywood Cover Up,


 along with many other wonderful stories by award-winning crime writers,

follow the Amazon link which is on my Amazon Author Page further down this page.


If you do purchase the book and read my story and those of the other authors,

we would appreciate it if you’d leave some feedback on the Amazon site.

It is always helpful to know what our readers think.


In A Word: Murder is in aid of The Princess Alice Hospice

in memory of Maxine Clarke, crime writer, editor and blogger.

You can find the hospice via this link

You can visit Maxine’s  Memorial blog, which is still up and running, via this link

I have an Author Page on Amazon and you can find links to all the books where I have contributed.

I have also been busy with Ms Birdsong Investigates: Murder in Ampney Parva

The Vale of the White Horse - Lavinia Birdsong's home on the Berkshire/Oxfordshire Downs

The Vale of the White Horse – Lavinia Birdsong’s home on the Berkshire/Oxfordshire Downs

 This is the first book in the series and I thought I’d completed it, but as some of you may know

I was inspired by a family wedding in 2013, 

and I soon  found Ms B pushing her way in and giving me a new Ms B story: The Safe House 

The Safe House (c) Jane Risdon 2014

The Safe House (c) Jane Risdon 2014

 which caused some changes in Murder in Ampney Parva.

I then had a fab birthday week last year –  you may have read about – which included a fabulous visit to the Observatory at Herstmonceaux.

Before I could say Sea of Tranquillity,

Ms B was prodding me to write Murder at the Observatory – once again causing me to go back over the first two books and make suitable changes to accommodate her latest investigation.

I do hope she lets me get on with everything before she taps her Manola Blahniks impatiently again.  Time will tell. 

Earth in the distance seen from the Lunar surface (c) NASA 1969

Earth in the distance seen from the Lunar surface (c) NASA 1969

The Icing on the Cake…The Thrill of it All.

It is such a thrill to receive feed-back from readers.

Writing is such a lonely occupation and so to know someone has actually read what you’ve written and liked it enough to comment on Social Media, and to then pop across to Amazon to leave a review with some lovely sparkly stars, and a #1 Best Seller  spot to boot: well, that is the icing on the cake.

In September I signed with Accent Press Ltd and in October they published their Halloween Anthology, Shiver, in which I contributed my short story, The Haunting of Anne Chambers – a Ghost story set in Cornwall where I have spent many years working with recording artists we managed there.

Shiver from Accent Press Oct 2014

We used to stay with friends in the village of Paul, not far from Mousehole, and there is a wonderful old church there – Paul Church, also known as St. Pol de Leon  – which has some interesting history attached to it.  The Spanish came ashore during the Spanish Armada, did a little raping and pillaging – which accounts for so many dark-haired locals with Spanish-sounding names I guess – but perhaps we won’t go there!


Inside the Church Chancel there is a plaque which inspired my story The Haunting of Anne Chambers – it reads exactly as follows:

Interr’d near this place lies ye body

of Captain Andrew Elton

Commander of the Godfrey Gally.

He was killd in an engagement

with a French Privateer

Off the Lands End of England,

Sept. the 4th 1710 Aged 53.

His merit being sufficiently known

He needs no further inscription.

The Haunting of Anne Chambers is a Ghost story about Pirates:

Anne and Andrew are lovers. 

They’re also Privateers – Pirates – and they’re planning to run away together to a new life, after one last raid.

But, when Anne is knocked out cold, she comes round to find that the world around her has changed disturbingly.

That people have purchased, read, and really enjoyed this anthology which features some wonderful stories by several successful writers, is fabulous.

I’ve received some positive reviews of my stories on Amazon which chuffed me to bits at the time, and still does.

The thrill of it all – for me – is that they enjoyed my story enough to leave such positive comments awarding it 5* – that really is the icing on the cake.

But it hasn’t ended there.

In December Accent Press published Wishing on a Star which included my short story, Merry Christmas Everybody, which is also based on a true story.

Wishing on a Star 

Music lovers will recall the untimely death of Phil Lynott, Thin Lizzy, in 1986; this served as the inspiration for my story.

A couple of years after his death I found myself in a recording studio working with a rock band we managed at the time, over the Christmas period.

  The studio was owned by a friend of Phil’s and, not too long before he died, the singer spent some time at the studio and house of the owner – a very famous rock guitarist.

Besides the band being with us we also had a good friend, a clairvoyant, who was interested in the recording process.  She loved it and had the time of her life watching how the tracks were put together.

And then we had a very strange experience in the studio – an unworldly experience some might call it.

When asked to write for Wishing on a Star the experiences we had in studio came back to me and I was inspired to write Merry Christmas Everybody.

There are tensions in the studio when Twister records their new album.

The band members are at one another’s throats and someone is messing with their recordings.

The band blames their producer, but it soon becomes clear that someone unexpected is trying to get a message of festive goodwill through to them.

This has been well received and I am really excited that readers have seen fit to give it so many 5* reviews on Amazon.  

The Thrill of it all:

 The book was #1 on Amazon soon after it was published.

More icing on the cake.

Over the past few of years I’ve been fortunate enough to find my stories included in various Anthologies, several in aid of worthy charities such as :

The Princess Alice Hospice (In A Word: Murder Anthology) Print and e-Book

Out in Paperback 14th February 2014 on and

Out in Paperback 14th February 2014 on and The Princess Alice Hospice


 Women’s Aid, Women for Women, Breakthrough (I Am Woman Vol. 1 Anthology) e-Book

I Am Woman Volume 1 Anthology

I Am Woman Volume 1 Anthology featuring my short story The Look


The Norfolk Hospice, (Telling Tales Anthology) No longer in print.

Telling Tales Anthology featuring two of my stories: The Debt Collector and The Ghost in the Privy

Telling Tales Anthology which features two of my stories: The Debt Collector and The Ghost in the Privy.

  I’ve been more than happy to write specifically for these causes, especially the Hospices, because my own father was being cared for in one when he died. 

They don’t receive Government funding – they rely upon donations.  The care they provide is second to none.  And I am happy to provide stories for any other similar causes should I be asked.


I am busy working on Ms Birdsong Investigates which should be published later this year.

Ms Birdsong is a former MI5 Officer who is ‘voluntarily’ retired following a messed-up operation in conjunction with her MI6 partner, who somehow managed to remain in the service, finding himself posted to Moscow.

   Taking refuge in a small village in rural Oxfordshire where she is hiding from her enemies, and trying to build a new life for herself, Ms Birdsong soon finds all her training comes in useful when she involves herself in investigating murder and dirty deeds in Ampney Parva.

MI5 where Lavinia Birdsong was an Officer until her forced retirement to Ampney Parva

MI5 where Lavinia Birdsong worked until her forced retirement to Ampney Parva

Thanks to everyone who has purchased these books and enjoyed them enough to let me and the other authors know.

It makes it all worthwhile.




That was the Year, that was…..

 That was the year, that was….it’s over so let it go.

What a year!

Windmill in Rye (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Windmill in Rye (c) Jane Risdon 2014

January arrived with an appointment with the surgeon’s knife, only to be postponed at the operating room door; phew!

A 60’s Icon, Samantha Juste passed away in February

and I was pleasantly surprised by the number of those who read and commented on my piece about her, and who remembered her with the same affection as I.

Her passing reminded me of those wonderful, care-free days in my teens filled with music, fashion, and the changing world around me. 

I know many scientists, and others who have changed the world and who have done so much more for human-kind died this year, but Samantha was a link to my teens.

I was also fortunate enough to have some of my short stories and flash fiction published and Pod-cast during February as well as being interviewed by other authors on their blogs.  Links for all these are on my blog roll.

February also saw the paper-back publication of In A Word: Murder – a crime anthology – which had been published in November 2013 as an e-Book.

I was thrilled to be asked to contribute two stories for this very worthy cause – The Princess Alice Hospice, Surrey – in memory of Maxine Clarke, writer, blogger and editor.

Out in Paperback 14th February 2014 on and

Out in Paperback 14th February 2014 on and

Both my stories received really positive and uplifting reviews which has been encouraging.

March found me spending a week with my sister and her husband.  My week with them was spent visiting some fabulous places which were of particular interest to me, and which I wrote about here.

We visited Rye and Rye Church which was wonderful. Going up on to the roof of the Church and getting the most fantastic views of the surrounding countryside, the town and sea.  How I ever got up those narrow wooden stairs and squeezed through the tiny door on to the roof I shall never know. 

Inside St Mary's Parish Church Rye (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Inside St Mary’s Parish Church Rye (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Anyone who knows me will tell you that I adore anything to do with astronomy and space.  As a special birthday treat they took me to a lecture at  the Herstmonceaux Observatory where I had the most amazing time.  I got to look through one of the telescopes Sir Patrick Moore used to map the Moon – his observations being used by NASA for the Apollo Moon Landings.

I managed to get the idea for a Ms Birdsong Investigates story whilst there: Murder at the Observatory.

The Observatory Science Centre, Herstmonceux. (c) 2010 Science Projects Ltd

The Observatory Science Centre, Herstmonceux. (c) 2010 Science Projects Ltd

I also spent a relaxing and inspirational day walking around the beautiful gardens and house at Wakehurst Place, part of Kew, and where the Millenium Seed Bank is held.

Wakehurst Place Manor House (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Wakehurst Place Manor House (c) Jane Risdon 2014

As always I took lots of photos to remind me of my visit.

Later in the week we spent an interesting afternoon looking round the home of Rudyard Kipling – Batemans – and his picturesque gardens.

Batemans: Home of Rudyard Kipling (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Batemans: Home of Rudyard Kipling (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Such a thrill.

We also took in a visit to the town of Lewes and spent some time walking around Lewes castle.  Unfortunately it rained and was misty and so some of the views were obscured.  Nevertheless, the castle was fascinating. 

Lewes Castle (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Lewes Castle (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Another day found us strolling around The National Pinetum at Bedgebury and the fantastic collection of trees there.  It was so lovely, so quiet – apart from birdsong – and very relaxing.  I loved it and took lots of photos once again.

Bedgebury National Pinetum (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Bedgebury National Pinetum (c) Jane Risdon 2014

A trip to a wonderful medieval manor house called Ightham Mote followed and was delightful.  The gardens and the house are such a joy.  So much history and fascinating architecture.

Ightham Mote (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Ightham Mote (c) Jane Risdon 2014

March also brought a medical emergency involving our son which was very upsetting and worrying.  He was diagnosed with an extremely rare disorder which was only discovered to exist in the last four years and, as yet, there is no known treatment. 

Only 1/2% of the male population is known to have it, and he has the rarest form. It is research in progress according to the medical experts.

April found me taking the bull by the horns; I decided to have a go at submitting some of my work to publishers for the first time.  I didn’t have any real expectations but I thought the experience would be good for me.

And so most of April and May was spent writing, editing and sending out my submissions. More on this later….

June always brings Heritage Day at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst, and I and a friend spent a lovely day wandering around the grounds, exploring the Old College, and the New College, and the Chapel, as well as watching Gurkha displays, marching bands and other attractions. One highlight was having a Gurkha Batt for lunch.

(c) Jane Risdon 2011

(c) Jane Risdon 2011

I used to walk in the grounds back in my youth, before they were closed to the public when the IRA threats became too great. My husband and I used to walk there often when we were ‘courting,’ although nine times out of ten his road manager and band would come looking for us before too long, ready to whisk him away for a gig somewhere or other. 

Group Van 1969 in France (c) Jane Risdon 1969

Group Van in France 1969 – no big trucks in those days. (c) Jane Risdon 1969

 My mother played there as a child.  So I am familiar with the Academy and always love going back when I can.  Several friends married Officer Cadets so I’ve attended a good few weddings there as well.

(c) Jane Risdon 2011

(c) Jane Risdon 2011

June and July was also spent doing more Guest Blog appearances on other author’s pages, and interviews.  I also submitted two stories for a charity anthology which I am still waiting to hear back about, plus more submissions to publishers.

One of my brother’s, and his partner, gave me a treat by taking me to an evening concert; The Last Night of the Audley End Proms at Audley End House.  We spent a fab weekend going to flower markets, long walks, delightful pubs, and eateries topped off with the concert.  A wonderful way to spend a weekend and such fun company too.

Audley End House, Saffron Walden, Essex (c) Jane Risdon 2014

In August one of the publishers I had submitted to asked me to write two stories for them and so I submitted The Haunting of Anne Chambers and Merry Christmas Everybody.

 I spent the month holding my breath….

September and I was back in hospital for my long-awaited, previously postponed shoulder operation.  I’d been writing like a maniac throughout July and August trying to get as much done as possible as I knew once I’d had the operation I’d be unable to type properly for 9-12 months.  As far as I know the operation has been a success.  I am now having physiotherapy and gradually regaining the use and strength back in my shoulder.

Something wonderful happened in September:  I signed to Accent Press Ltd and they began working with me on my two submissions for their Halloween and Christmas anthologies.

Shiver was published 9th October 2014 with my story The Haunting of Anne Chambers included.  Shiver was number one on amazon best sellers chart and my story received 5* reviews.

Shiver from Accent Press Oct 2014

November proved to be a very sad month for my family and I.  A much-loved uncle who had been in hospital for almost a year was sent home with only a few weeks to live, passed away.  He had endured unspeakable suffering with great dignity and humour and it broke our hearts to see such a fun person stricken in such a cruel manner.

The Chapel had over 150 mourners struggling to find somewhere to stand.  Being a fan of Elvis and Rock n’ Roll it was fab to see so many of his old school mates turn up in their drain-pipes and cowboy hats.  His coffin was in the red of Ferrari (he and a cousin of mine were avid race-goers and Ferrari fans – my cousin owning two of his own), with the Ferrari insignia on the front.

His coffin came in to the strains of The Old Rugged Cross by Alan Jackson; one of his daughters was a bearer.

His children and grandchildren gave speeches and a long time friend sang a hymn for him.

After prayers and other readings, Elvis was heard singing How Great Thou Art and finally we sent our uncle to his untimely rest to the sound of Elvis singing My Way.

Wishing on a Star was published 15th November 2014 with my story Merry Christmas Everybody included. 

Wishing on a Star

I have a 5* review on amazon so far.

I am dead chuffed.  Mission accomplished.  The hard work begins.

We have had a couple of births and deaths in the family this year –  who hasn’t!

  I know it is all part of the rich tapestry of human existence, but for each of us who has lost loved ones it is still raw and painful to bear,  and those of us who have gained loved ones – new family members – it is a joy and a blessing tinged with sadness.  Sadness that they will never know those who have left us, and who have enriched our lives beyond words.

I wish my son, his children, and one of my brother’s better health.  For all those suffering I hope that this new year will bring better health, freedom from pain, and the worry ill-health brings.

We remembered our War dead – especially WW1 – and those who suffered from their wounds and lived with the pain all their lives.

Especially Great Uncle Thomas Nyhan – who died at the Somme in 1916.

Great Uncle Thomas Nyhan died 26the September 1916 (France) (c) Jane Risdon 2014

And my maternal Grand-dad who was gassed in WW1 and died from the effects in 1955.

Also Cousin George who never recovered from the sinking of his ship in the Atlantic in WW2 and who died in 1980.


That was the year that was, it’s over so let it go…..

I wish you all a very happy, healthy, peaceful, and safe 2015.

Do join me again soon.  It has been a blast.

Thanks for being here. xx

Audley End House 3rd Aug 2014  (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Seasons Greetings Friends, and thank you for being here

Seasons Greetings one and all


Many thanks for being here and making it such a joy to connect with you.

It has been an interesting year and I have enjoyed your posts and comments so much.

I have had a wonderful time visiting your blogs (those who have them) and I wish you all the very best.

I shall be back before the New Year to see what you have all been up to.

Stay happy, safe, and healthy.

Wishing you all this, and peace too.

Jane xx

If you are planning on reading something over the holiday period I do hope you will consider these:

Wishing on a Star

Wishing on a Star (anthology) featuring some fab stories and one by me – Merry Christmas Everybody – based on a real event 26 years ago at Christmas.

Published by Accent Press Ltd.


Shiver from Accent Press Oct 2014

Shiver (anthology) featuring some spine chillers including one by me – The Haunting of Anne Chambers – set in Cornwall – and #1 on amazon’s Kindle Store – Halloween.  #15 on amazon’s Kindle Scary stories.

Published by Accent Press Ltd.

If you feel like benefitting The Princess Alice Hospice, Surrey, you might consider purchasing

In A Word: Murder

Out in Paperback 14th February 2014 on and

Out in Paperback 14th February 2014 on and

in memory of Maxine Clarke, Crime writer, editor and blogger

all proceeds go to this wonderful Hospice.

There are some cracking murders in this anthology written by award-winning crime, and I have two stories included:  Dreamer and also Hollywood Cover Up.

Published by Margot Kinberg.

Rocking Christmas

Enjoy your holidays.

Jane xx 

Wishing On A Star: Merry Christmas Everybody is published 16th November 2014

There are tensions in the studio when Twister record their new album.

The band members are at each other’s throats and someone is messing up their recordings.

The band blames their producer, but it soon becomes clear that someone unexpected

is trying to get a message of festive goodwill through to them….

Wishing on a Star

Wishing On A Star

A seasonal collection of short stories

 published 16th November 2014 by Accent Press Ltd.

My short story

Merry Christmas Everybody

is  included.


If you’re into Rock Music,

if you’ve ever wondered what can happen in a recording studio

when the tension and artistic temperament within a band explodes,

if you’d like to read a story based on real events

then look no further.

Rocking Christmas

Wishing On A Star

A seasonal collection of short stories

Featuring stories from

Christina Jones:  Comfort and Joy

Santa Lives: Tricia Maw

A Christmas Murder: Marsali Taylor

No Smoke Without Fire: Bill Kitson

Proof Of The Pudding: Jane Wenham-Jones

What The Dickens!: Caroline Dunford

Merry Christmas Everybody: Jane Risdon

Family Matters: Jane Jackson


Do let me know what you think of my story and the others by commenting here and also by leaving a comment on amazon.

Feedback is always welcome; whatever it is.

Many thanks.




Remembering Thomas 1882-1916: The Somme on a personal level.

Great Uncle Thomas Nyhan died 26the September 1916 (France)

On the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of WW1 1914-1918

I ‘d like to remember and honour all those who lost their lives, including countless civilians, caught up in the horror of war.

In particular I’d like to remember family members.

However, even though I’ve been researching our family for over 30 years, many still remain illusive.

Therefore I decided I would have one family member represent all those too numerous to mention individually.

Guardsman Thomas Nyhan – Ist. Battalion Irish Guards


died of wounds in France in September 1916

and is remembered with honour in the Military cemetery where he is buried at the Somme Battlefields alongside his comrades.

Final resting place for Thomas Nyhan 1916

He came from a small rural village in what is now Southern Ireland, the second son in a family of  ten children:

seven boys and two girls, one of whom was my maternal Grandmother.

Sadly there aren’t any photos of Thomas that I know of still in existence.

Only the headstone above marks his life and death.

I know he could not only read and write in both English and Irish, he was also fluent in both spoken languages. 

Indeed, both his parents could read and write English and Irish as well as speak both languages fluently, 

which I understand was rare in the early 19th century in rural Ireland.

Thomas Nyhan grew up with this view.

The view Thomas Nyhan left behind – view from his village.

 Thomas and his siblings had been educated by a governess, which was also evident when reading anything written by my Grandmother.

When she used to write to my mother’s teacher giving reasons for Mum’s absence from school,

her letters were often pinned to the board in class, by the teacher, as an example of a beautifully written letter and handwriting.

I must admit reading anything she’d written was always a joy.

Parish Church where Thomas Nyhan would have worshipped.

If he had returned to his homeland Thomas would most likely have been laid to rest in this Parish Church eventually, where most of his family now rest. 

It is built on the site of 4 previous cathedrals, even though the population of the village was barely 400 people until the 20th Century. 

I visited with my mother and sister in 2008, soon after I discovered Mum still had family alive and living where Thomas and her mother had.

It was a very moving visit and sadly, since then, two of her remaining cousins have died and others are very old and frail.

As far as I can establish Thomas never married.

The Nyhan family was a close and loving family from what I am told by those relations who are still living.

Thomas’ father would play the fiddle and tin whistle for the family as they sat inside their home in the evenings. 

The girls would dance with their brothers and mother and sing Irish songs which were passed down to me when I was growing up via my grandmother, Thomas’ sister.

I think of Thomas dying so far from home alongside his many comrades,

and how he must have missed his family and longed for home and to see them all again.

I think of his father, widowed by then, having not only lost his wife but two sons and a young daughter before the war began. 

Like so many other families at that time their lives changed forever with the outbreak of World War 1. 

I feel sad that none of them ever knew what happened to Thomas. 

They could only imagine, like many thousands of other families.

I feel happy that I managed to find Thomas as a result of my research into our family history,

and to have been able to let his surviving nieces, nephews, and wider family know about him. 

Although some of them have died since,  those left behind – direct family and distant family –  are remembering him today along with all those others who gave their lives so that we might live ours in the manner we chose.

RIP Great Uncle Thomas Nyhan, and all those family members too numerous to list here who also gave their lives.

 RIP all your comrades too.

Thank You.

All Photos (c) Jane Risdon 2014 – All Rights Reserved

Thrills, chills and giggles: Shiver on All Hallows Eve.

Something to snuggle up with on a cold, dark, windy night.


ISBN: 9781783752195

Perfect for Halloween.

Thrills, chills and giggles too.

Hide-under-the-bed stories, laugh-out-loud stories and

food-for-thought stories – something for everyone.

Christina Jones: Laying The Ghost

Cara Cooper: Your Number’s Up

Caroline Dunford: The Dark Night of Dawn

Jane Risdon:  The Haunting of Anne Chambers

Tricia Maw: Uncle Henry

Marie Laval: Cemetery for Two Princesses

Andrea Frazer: All Hallows

David Rogers: Curtains

Helena Fairfax: The Pumpkin Hacker

Bill Kitson:  Dead Ringer

I hope you Shiver right down to your timbers.

Let me know, let Amazon know, and let Accent Press Ltd know what you think

 I know I’d appreciate your feed-back.


The Haunting of Anne Chambers – Cornwall and a tidy desk

My Writing Space (c) Jane Risdon 2014

I’ve just had a good tidy up and cleared my writing desk ready for a full on session this week.

It’s amazing just how cluttered it manages to get when I have my head down and I’m in over-drive – I have been writing a great deal this summer.

Hence the need to have a good tidy.

Inspired by the publication of my short story, The Haunting of Anne Chambers, in Shiver (Accent Press Ltd)

ISBN: 9781783752195

ISBN: 9781783752195

which has garnered some wonderful 5 star reviews  of the book – with even a #1 Best Seller spot on Amazon –  and really fab stories by my fellow contributors which I’ve really enjoyed reading, my digits have been itching to get back to work.

It is still difficult to type and sit for too long but artists must suffer for their art – I am suffering…well just a little.

Well, I suffer for as long as is bearable and then I have a wander about, do my physiotherapy, and  then have a much longed-for cuppa before settling down for another session.

I am about to begin work again, now with a nice tidy desk, but before I do 

I thought I’d give some background to my story in Shiver whilst having a much-needed cup of tea.

The Haunting of Anne Chambers is set in Cornwall and is a tale of Privateers and Pirates with a twist.


I set the story in Cornwall in the village of Paul, just up the hill from Mousehole, because I spent a lot of time in the early 1990’s recording at a studio in the village and looking round the church and visiting the other villages was a great way to distress after non-stop sessions cooped up inside at  mixing desk.

The King’s Arms became a favourite watering-hole and the village Church of St. Pol de Leon (St. Paul’s), featured in my story fascinated me even then.

Local tales about Pirates and secret tunnels and sea battles with the French and the Spanish remained with me long after the visits to the village ended, and when I was faced with writing a Ghost story for Shiver, I wanted it to be different – not what I normally write – and the idea for my story began to form from memories of our time in Paul.

The title came first and was additionally inspired by my two-part short story,

The Secret of Willow Cottage:  The Tale of the Reluctant Bride and the prequel, The Tale of the Jilted Lover.

Willow Cottage (c) Jane Risdon 2010 - Features in The Secret of Willow Cottage

Willow Cottage (c) Jane Risdon 2010 – Features in The Secret of Willow Cottage

This two-parter was published in May and June last year and was also Pod-cast. 

The response to The Tale of the Reluctant Bride was so encouraging I went on to write The Tale of the Jilted Lover. 

If you ever find yourself in the village of Paul, do pop into the church and check out the inscription on a mural tablet situated between the choir stalls and the pulpit (on the north side of the Chancel). If you’ve read The Haunting of Anne Chambers you will understand why the village was important to Privateers and Pirates and how some of my characters originated.

I shall love you and leave you for now.  I have work to do on Ms Birdsong Investigates.

Please check out Shiver, and if you get the chance do let all those contributing (including me) know what you think of the stories.

I have really enjoyed reading them. 

There is something for everyone. 

There are funny stories, scary stories and plain weird stories but they add up to a great read for Halloween.

Ghosts, Ghouls and Hauntings

Ghosts, Ghouls and Hauntings

You will find stories from:

Andrea Frazer, Bill Kitson, Caroline Dunford, Christina Jones, Helena Fairfax, Tricia Maw,

Marie Laval, Cara Cooper, David Rogers,

 and me.

 Have a great week and thanks for popping in.

Shiver is published today – 9th October 2014. I’m so excited.

Shiver: - A must have collection of halloween stories by best-selling authors

 Thrilled to be published today in this FAB collection alongside so many successful authors including my life-long friend,

Christina Jones,

who has been so inspirational and supportive of me and my aspirations to become a writer.

Thanks Chrissie

without your encouragement and advice my fingers would never have seriously connected with the keyboard. 

Even though we write in different genres she has often read my work when, other than my husband, no-one had ever read anything I’d written.

To find we both have stories in the same collection is such fun. 

We’ve shared an anthology once before but this was a complete surprise.

My contribution to Shiver is

The Haunting of Anne Chambers.

If you’ve read and enjoyed my two short stories

The Secret of Willow Cottage: The Tale of the Reluctant Bride


The Secret of Willow Cottage: The Tale of the Jilted Lover

 I hope you might enjoy 

The Haunting of Anne Chambers:

It’s a Ghost story set in Cornwall – a tale of Privateers, Pirates and ….well,

I’ll let you find out.

My fellow contributors are:

Andrea Frazer, Bill Kitson, Caroline Dunford, Christina Jones,


Helena Fairfax, Tricia Maw, Marie Laval, Cara Cooper and

David Rogers.

I know there will be something for everyone



Available from Accent Press Ltd.

ISBN: 9781783752195

There are many who have encouraged me and supported my writing, too numerous to mention – family and friends especially, who deserve my thanks. 

Thank you each and every one of you.


I want to thank everyone who has followed me and encouraged me on this blog and in other ways – you know who you are.

My story is dedicated to you all.


Update 11th October 2014:  Just seen this 

 Apparently SHIVER is #1 Best Seller in Children’s Halloween eBooks on Amazon.

It is #4 Best Seller Children’s Scary Halloween Stories on Amazon.


It is #60 Best Seller Single Author’s with Short Stories on Amazon.

I don’t think my story is  Children’s story – but it could be I suppose.

A little jolly back in the summer: Audley End House.

Audley End House, Saffron Walden, Essex

Audley End House, Saffron Walden, Essex.

People arriving and taking their seats at Audley End House

17th Century and one of the finest examples of a Jacobean Manor house in the country.

Set in 6,000 acres of land with gardens designed by Capability Brown.

The grounds are now 1/3rd their original size and the property has been run English Heritage since 1984.

There are over 100 rooms in the house owned by Lord Braybrooke – the 10th Baron – whose family the title was created in 1788.

 Audley End House put on an event on 3rd August 2014:  

The Last Night of the Proms

which I was fortunate enough to have attended with family…no, they’re not featured in any photos. 

One glimpse of my camera and they all run a mile!

Unknow concert goers enjoying Audley End House Last Night of the Prom.

 Gates opened late afternoon and people began to arrive with their seats, picnics and even small tents complete with candlesticks and silverware.

They tended to remain at the rear of the event where they could make a fast get-away at the end.

As I like to sit near the off-stage mixing desk at such events, between the huge PA’s where the sound is (one hopes) the best, we found ourselves sitting in the centre of the lawns.

Looking over the pictured couple but with a good view. 


Unfortunately the house was somewhat obscured by the stage and it wasn’t the sunniest of days, so many photos turned out to be far too dark to post.

Security at Audley End House.

Others who hadn’t purchased tickets to come inside the event, sat outside and got  free show.


The event was opened with a fly past of a WW2 Spitfire owned and flown by Caroline Grace.

(c) Jane Risdon 2014 Grace Spitfire

Her Spitfire flew out of the sun and over the heads of the audience, looping the loop, diving, and tumbling through the air,


 to the soundtrack of the Dambuster’s (movie) played by The National Symphony Orchestra.




Grace Spitfire (c) Jane Risdon 2014

She spent a good ten minutes flying over head before she flew off into the sunset.

The speed of the plane and the way it tumbled and span around made it difficult to photograph – I did my best.

Later she was available for a chat about her plane and further flying events in one of the many tents on site which included the usual food and beer outlets. 

We never managed to get over to her as the queues were so long and the concert was about to begin.

Last night of the Prom at Audley End House 3rd Aug 2014 (c) Jane Risdon 2014

The concert began with the setting sun and lasted until about 10pm.

Audley End House 3rd Aug 2014

Moon over Audley End House 3rd Aug 2014 (c) Jane Risdon 2014

We enjoyed performances by: 

Gardar Thor Cortes, Camilla Kerslake, Laura Knight and Amy Dickinson.


Camilla Kerslake and Gardar Thor Cortes on stage at Audley End.

Later everyone sang Rule Britannia, Land of Hope and Glory and of course, Jerusalem

followed by a wonderful firework display to music, with all the usual flag waving.

I must admit the highlight for me was the Spitfire, but the whole event was magical and I think I enjoyed it more than The Last Night of the Proms in Hyde Park last year.

My family thought the same.  We had a wonderful time with great music and a terrific atmosphere, lots of great food – prepared for us – with plenty of lovely wine too.

The taxi back arrived on time and we spent the night in a cute little Inn not too far away.  A wonderful weekend all round.

As ever all my photos are (c) Jane Risdon 2014: All rights reserved.

Audley End House:

Tel: UK 0870 333 1181

London Road, Saffron Waldon, Essex CB11 4JF

Audley End House Last Night of The Prom 3rd Aug 2014

Audley End House 3rd Aug 2014

Aug 3rd 2014 Audley End House

Shiver me timbers: update – Shiver’s publication day is 9th October 2014

Shiver from Accent Press Oct 2014

I can hardly contain my excitement.

Publication day for SHIVER

is October 9th 2014.

ISBN: 9781783752195

Published by Accent Press Ltd.  at £2.99

Advance orders are being taken so I understand.

My short story, The Haunting of Anne Chambers, is included along with stories by:

Andrea Frazer, Bill Kitson, Caroline Dunford,

Christina Jones, Helena Fairfax, Tricia Maw,

Marie Laval, Cara Cooper and David Rogers.

For more details pop across to

Discover what Anne Chambers and Andrew Pasco got up to in Cornwall.

I’m getting Shivers sharing my good news

Shiver from Accent Press Oct 2014

Those of you kind enough to pop in here from time to time will know I’ve been submitting to Publishers during the summer, more in hope than expectation.

Well, I am very happy to share my good news with you.

I’ve been included in SHIVER,

a collection of horror stories

with contributions by so many authors I admire such as:

Andrea Frazer, Bill Kitson, Caroline Dunford, Christina Jones, Helena Fairfax, Tricia Maw, Marie Laval, Cara Cooper and David Roger.

SHIVER is published in early October 2014 by ACCENT PRESS LTD.

 I’ve signed a Publishing Agreement for this collection and I am hoping it will lead to more stories being published by them. 

They have a Christmas story I’ve written under consideration, so fingers crossed.

This story is a  departure from my usual Crime/Mystery writing – I’ve never attempted a Ghost story before and it was fun to write.

My story is called ‘The Haunting of Anne Chambers’

  I am thrilled to bits and really excited.

More information to follow soon.

I do hope you like the cover – Halloween is soon upon us.

Catch up soon.  Have a FAB weekend one and all.

I’m popping in briefly to say thanks …

Jane Risdon (c) 2014

I just wanted to pop in and thank everyone for their good wishes and for being so supportive of me during my convalescence following my recent operation.

Your kindness is really appreciated and has kept me going. 

Thank you one and all.

Since I went off the radar I notice I’ve lots more new followers here so I want to thank those who are new here as well.

Each day it’s been a lovely surprise discovering new friends and followers who have joined us here.

Unfortunately I cannot thank you all and welcome you personally, not physically up to it just yet, but I want to say a huge welcome and thanks for being here.

Please accept this as my greeting to each and every one of you with my thanks too.

(c) Jane Risdon 2014

Every day I am getting more movement back in my shoulder and arm, and I can spend a little longer at the computer but unfortunately not long enough to do any real writing yet.

I am not being idle…

I am reading a lot and also visiting blogs and websites belonging to my many friends on here and, where I am able, I am managing to leave a comment.  This is something I’ve been wanting to do for ages and now I have a little additional time I am enjoying browsing.

I’ll be back soon with updates on how things are going in general regarding my writing.

Thanks once more for visiting me here and for your friendship.  Makes me very happy.

Enjoy your day everyone and keep safe, well, and happy.

           I hope you enjoy my photos –  a little sunshine for you today.                               

                                                 I love Trees

Paperback or Kindle: a must for your holiday reading – In A Word: Murder

A great holiday read.


If you are wondering what to read whilst enjoying the freedom of a Summer Holiday,

 here is one solution:

In A Word: Murder

A Crime Anthology featuring stories by writers from across the world

set in the world of Publishing:

Book Publishing, Music Publishing, Blogging, Reviewing and Editing….

A world full of danger.

The Agency by Award Winning Poet and Author, Pamela Griffiths

Gives readers a look at a True Crime Magazine and what happens when its senior editor is killed….

The Story by Paula K Randall

A Short Story Competition becomes a life-or-death issue….

The Million Seller by Margot Kinberg

The stakes are high when an up-and-coming author with a lot of earning potential decides to make a major change in his career…. 

A Beach Report from Myrtle Clover by Elizabeth S. Craig

A holiday at the beach proves to be less than relaxing when Myrtle Clover’s newspaper reporting instincts tell her there’s trouble at the quiet seaside resort she’s visiting….

La Lotte by Sarah Ward

A modern-day crime turns out to have an interesting literary connection to the past. And someone feels that justice had not been done….

The Killing of Captain Hastings by Award Winning Author,  Martin Edwards

Book Blog Reviews and a Literary Festival in the North of England come together in an unexpected way….

The In-Box by Margot Kinberg

Shows just how dangerous the life of a Publisher can be.  And just how much you can learn from someone’s email….

And, my own two contributions:

Dreamer by Jane Risdon

When wanting something so bad brings out the worst in a 1980’s Rock band, poised for success at any price….

Hollywood Cover-up by Jane Risdon

Crossing swords with the rich and powerful in Hollywood is never a good idea, especially if you write about it and the characters in your book seek to stop publication: at any cost.


Some of our readers said:

3470 C.E said:

‘Jane, I really enjoyed your short stories, especially ‘Dreamer.’ I was on the edge of my seat until I finished it!!

That was excellent! OMG I felt terrible about Jake, but I guess that’s the way it goes…’


William Reichard said:

‘I finally had a chance to sit down and read your stories from In a Word, and I really enjoyed them! I most liked that they felt very modern with the references to Amazon and Android phones and such, but they were also colorful in the vein of Elmore Leonard.

Definitely made me think your stories of the ’60s music biz will be interesting to read! Congrats–the sense that you’re having fun as a writer is strong, and it looks like you’re gaining traction. I’ll definitely be looking for more!’


Col’s Criminal Library said:

‘Well this was an enjoyable way to spend a few hours night-time reading before lights out. All the stories worked for me, but if pressed to choose a couple of favourites I would have to plump for both of Jane Risdon’s stories; Dreamer and Hollywood Cover-up, with the former on top of the pile.

Dreamer gives us a glimpse inside the world of music, with a rock band intent on resolving some artistic differences. Fantastic!

As previously mentioned in another post, purchasing the book which was conceived in the memory of Maxine Clarke will help support the Princess Alice Hospice.

Enjoyable and entertaining.’


 FictionFan’s Book Reviews said:

‘Buy it because it’s in a good cause….then read it because it’s good fun!  Highly recommended!’  FictionFan’s Book Reviews.


clothesinbooks reviewed the book – follow the link to read:


The Game’s Afoot reviewed the book – follow the link to read: 


Mysteries in Paradise said:

Many thanks to Margot Kinberg for putting this collection of short stories together. I thoroughly enjoyed them all, particularly Elizabeth Craig’s Miss Marple spoof A Beach Report From Myrtle Clover. For me the cleverest was The Killing of Captain Hastings by  Martin Edward. Well done folks!


Maggie Thom said:

This is a really good collection of short crime stories. There is such a good taste of a variety of styles and of stories. All were rather captivating in their own way. There are secrets, lies, murder, deceit, betrayal, double-cross, being sneaky… you name it you’ll find a story here that has it. There were definitely some surprising twists and some surprising endings. After reading it, it just left me with wanting more, which is a good sign of well written stories. It was easy to identify with the characters and it was easy to get pulled into the story, wondering where it would go. Congratulations to the seven contributing authors. I really think they did a great job of telling a story in a just a few pages and in holding my attention and interest.


 Lesley Fletcher said:

While I am listed as a contributor to this book, I did not write any stories in it, so I feel comfortable leaving a review.
When I received my hard copy, I could hardly wait to read it. I left it on my kitchen table and read a story a day. What I really liked about this book was the different writing styles and delivery. Considering the number of authors who contributed it had a great coherence as all the stories were centred around the world of media and the written word.
In a Word, Murder left me wanting the stories to be longer. Totally enjoyable read designed to take the reader away for short periods.
Well done everyone. Maxine Clarke would have loved it, I’m sure. (this book was written in memory of Maxine with proceeds going to the Princess Alice Hospice)


 Carol Balawyder  said:
Anyone who writes or works in the area of crime fiction will love this collection of short crime stories. The collection offers a fresh look at crime writing from the viewpoint of writer, reviewer, publisher, editor, and blogging. All the stories captured my interest and as a writer I particularly appreciated the various voices and techniques and, of course, the suspense woven in these stories. As added bonus these stories were written in memory of crime writer Maxine Clarke. Neat.

And many more great reviews are out there, but don’t take their word for it:

Purchase In A Word: Murder

Great holiday reading

in aid of a great cause:

The Princess Alice Hospice

and discover what it’s all about for yourself.

Available in Paperback or Kindle from and


Author TC Chadinha – World Wide Work in Progress Blog Tour – my second guest today.


T C Chandinha - Author
Author T C Chadinha 
My second Guest on the World Wide Work in Progress Blog Tour is South African author
Like JOHN HOLT, my first guest today, TC doesn’t have his own blog but does have a Facebook Author Page
and so I offered to host him, and John, on my blog so that I could share these authors with you.
I do hope you enjoyed John Holt’s WW WIP and that you will enjoy reading about TC.
We would all love to read your comments so do be really kind and post them so that these authors can see what you think.
Thanks so much.
 Hi, My name is TC Chadinha.
I’m honoured to have been nominated by the amazing Jane Risdon
Here is my information:
 I was born in the year 1966, in the rough mining town of Brakpan on the fringes of Johannesburg, South Africa. In 1987, I joined the South African Police Force and was recruited into the Security Intelligence Unit—the equivalent of America’s CIA. I was employed as a covert operative in high-profile criminal operations across Africa. On my appointment as a commissioned officer I became the founding commander of the Counter Intelligence Unit in the Mpumalanga Province. After a successful stint I was inducted into the infamous Murder and Robbery Squad as a Senior Detective Captain, second in command of two Units. In the years that followed I experienced evil as my constant companion. 
In my journey through life’s labyrinth of bloody corridors, I walked and talked with death. I shook hands with the Devil many times. I lived a vicious life in one of the most violent countries in the world. I write from the heart. My work is life through my eyes. 
The first in the Frank Dempsey Series is titled – EMILY.
Emily T.C Chadinha Book Cover (5)
BOOK DESCRIPTION: After Emily Thomas, daughter of the American ambassador to South Africa, is kidnapped, tough cop Detective Captain Frank Dempsey and suspended CIA Agent Nick Crowley search for her in a high-speed chase across treacherous Africa. They discover the kidnappers have no intention of releasing her. Is she earmarked for the international sex slave trade? Will they find her? Who’s behind the conspiracy and why? 
The second in the series is titled – ALEXA. 
Alexa by C H Chadinha
BOOK DESCRIPTION: Shortly after American business tycoon Arthur Morgan relocates his family to Cape Town, South Africa, his sixteen-year-old daughter Alexa is abducted. No ransom demand is made. Amidst a serial killer investigation where young girls are slaughtered in cult-related killings, Detective Captain Frank Dempsey from the Serious and Organised Crime Unit is called upon to find the missing girl. He identifies a link between the Cult Killer’s victims and Alexa’s abduction. The chase is on to locate the tycoon’s daughter before she’s butchered and exhibited at a construction site like the other girls. Understaffed and racing against the clock, Frank relies on the help of his buddy and renowned criminal profiler Dr Liz Hamilton, to save Alexa and catch the killers. With pressure from the Police Commissioner to produce results, Frank reverts to unorthodox tactics, which see him demoted and exiled. In an unsuspected twist, Frank’s house is searched. DNA evidence originating from the Cult Killer crime scenes is found, resulting in his arrest. Is Frank behind these brutal slayings, and why? Did he take Alexa? Agent Nick Crowley and Dr Liz Hamilton are left to make sense of the mayhem. Is Alexa still alive? Will they find her in time?
Here are TC’s answers:
1) What am I working on?
I’m working on JODIE – third in the series of six. I’m very excited about this book.  
I’ve mapped out the last three books in the series and can’t wait to work on them on a more permanent basis. 
I’ve also scribbled down a few notes on the start of the second series. It’s crime from a different angle. I hope to enthrall the readers. 
2) How does my work differ from others of its genre?
Well, I lived the life I write about. I write from the heart. Through my eyes.
Most other authors in this genre write from research. 
And yes, facts are stranger than fiction in my series.
I give the readers insight to what really happens in the lives of the people who work with death. Its a dark industry. 
From my experience, a Murder and Robbery detective becomes the same animal who commits these heinous crimes. Then colder. More structured. And then the hunter. 
There are specific reasons why only a certain breed of law enforcement officers across the world combat these crimes. 
3) Why do I write what I do?
It’s what I know. I lived it for many years. And sex slavery is the fastest growing crime on the planet. People should be made aware of it. What will you do when your child is abducted? The world is an evil place. Good guys are sometimes forced to do bad things in the name of justice.  
4) How does my writing process work?
mill over in my mind till an opening sentence, sentence in the middle of the book and final sentence align. Hundreds of combinations pulse through my brain. It can take up to three months before I feel the flow of the story is perfect. It’s a mental process where I visualize the book – fact and fiction.
Novel length – my target is 80 000 words divided into anywhere between 94 and 120 chapters. Short, potent chapters. 
Only then do I start typing. 
– The first sentence under the heading Chapter 1, 
– The middle sentence under Chapter 60, 
– and the last sentence under Chapter 120.
After I’ve completed the first chapter, I write the last chapter. Then I write the middle one.
For the next eight to ten months I write backward and forward as my mood dictates. 
I write a chapter and then edit it before moving onto the next.
When I’m done I pass it onto my five Ideal Readers who dissect it. After running repairs it’s off to my proofreader. 
Next stop – Amazon. 
Thank you Jane Risdon and all you other great people for taking the time.
I hope you enjoy EMILY and ALEXA. Please let me know what you think about it.
Here are his links:
USA and New Zealand:

UK, Europe and South Africa:




 I hope you all enjoyed reading about T C Chadinha and his career in South Africa and his writing.
Thanks to TC for sharing this with us all.
My thanks also to JOHN HOLT 
I have enjoyed reading about both authors very much for sharing their WIP with us all.
  We look forward to receiving your feedback here and on my previous post for John Holt. 
Both authors have Facebook Fan Pages but do not have blogs so do check out their Facebook pages when you can.

Author John Holt: World Wide WIP Blog Tour – is my first nomination today

 John Holt -Author

I’d like to introduce you to a fellow author


who was nominated by me last week to take part in

The World Wide Work In Progress Blog Tour.

John does not yet have his own Blog and so I invited him to share his WW WIP with everyone on my own page; a first for me.

I do hope you will all take time out of your busy day to take a look at his contribution and answers and also take a look at his books.

Here is what John has to say about himself in answer to my questions today:

I live in Essex with my wife Margaret, daughter Elizabeth, and our cat Missy who adopted us. For many years I was a Chartered Surveyor in Local Government. In the nineteen seventies I was a Senior Project Manager with the Greater London Council, staying with them until 1986 when the organization was closed down. I then set up a surveying practice on my own account, carrying out condition surveys, and preparing architectural drawings. In 2004 I suffered a heart attack, and business declined. I eventually retired in 2008.

I came to writing quite late in life. I suppose, like a lot of people, I had always wanted to write a novel, but I could never think of a decent plot. Then in September 2005 we took a holiday in the Austrian Lake District. We stayed in Grundlsee, the first of three lakes. The second lake, Toplitzsee, is the deepest of the Austrian lakes, and was used by the German Navy during the war to test torpedoes and rockets. As the war came to an end many items were hidden in the lake, including counterfeit dollars, and pounds, weapons, jewellery, and there were rumours of hidden gold bullion. Since the war extensive searches have been carried and much has been discovered, but sadly no hidden gold.

This gave me the inspiration for my first novel “The Kammersee Affair” which was first published in December 2006.

I have subsequently written five novels featuring my private detective Tom Kendall,

and a “what if” novel,

“The Thackery Journal” set during and just after the American Civil War.

John Holt - his books


  • What am I working on?

Now that “Kendall”, my fifth novel to feature my private detective, has been published, I have made a tentative start on two other Kendall novels. Very early days I’m afraid, and a long way from a first draft, but I have my villain, I have the crime committed, and I have Kendall investigating. I am also working on an adventure novel based on a true 1931 story about a submarine that was intended to reach the North Pole under the ice. It never got there and was later found at the bottom of a Norwegian fjord. Once again very early days. I have two or three beginning chapters, and the end. Now all I need is about 200 pages in the middle. I am also thinking of a second American Civil War novel.

  • How does my work differ from others of its genre?


Tom Kendall is quite unlike many of the other private detectives – Phillip Marlowe, Sam Spade, Mickey Spillane. They were all tough guys, handy with their fists, and a gun. That’s not Kendall’s style. He isn’t the macho type, and he couldn’t hit the side of a barn with a gun. He relys on logic, and deduction. Oh, and the help of his business partner, Mollie, not that he would ever admit that, or tell her. There’s a lot of me in Kendall. He has a wicked sense of humour, so do I. He is stubborn, and I guess I am too. Once he gets an idea into his head it would take an earthquake to shift it. He is a little over-weight, although he would never admit that either, and he is not the fittest person on the planet.

  • Why do I write what I do?

 A very good question. I love the old film noir movies from the forties and fifties – Humphrey Bogart, Cagney, Edward G. For some while I wanted to write a novel in that same style. Pacey, snappy, punchy, with a touch of humour. I soon found out that for some reason I just couldn’t do it. Certainly nothing like as good as those original writers. But I quickly realised that I was actually doing something so much better. I was developing my own style, and my own characters. I wasn’t copying anyone else.

  • How does my writing process work?

I have always admired authors like Charles Dickens, and the Brontes. They started their work at page 1 and continued until the end. Dickens wrote a chapter per week for a magazine. Any corrections probably meant a whole page being re-written. I could never write like that. Fortunately with computers and word processing that way of writing is no longer necessary. I don’t really have a process as such. I mean I don’t sit down every day to write so many thousand words. I start with a basic idea, and then I write as I think of something, and just add it into the right position. I might wake during the night with an idea, or a sentence, floating around in my head. I get up and make a note, then go back to sleep. Maybe my latest idea might mean changes to something I have already written, well so be it. Using that process I now have seven novels self published – 5 featuring Tom Kendall; “The Kammersee Affair”, and “The Thackery Journal”

My facebook link is –

My Amazon author page is –

My twitter link is –


 The Mackenzie  Document



 ISBN 978-1-291-02123-3



Kendall could just see the television screen. There was a photograph of Governor Frank Reynolds. Across the bottom of the screen the ticker tape announced in large black letters ‘Governor Reynolds Murdered’. The voice over was filling in whatever detail was available. Apparently his body had been discovered earlier that morning. He had been found lying in his garage. He had been shot twice. One shot to the upper chest, the other hitting his shoulder. ‘Police believe that the weapon used was a 38 mm caliber revolver,’ the reporter said. Kendall froze. Anthony Shaw had also been killed by a 38 mm bullet. Kendall was not quite sure of what it all meant. What connection was there between Anthony Shaw, and the State Governor, and the business mogul, Ian Duncan? And what about Senator Mackenzie? Where did he fit in? And who or what was Latimer? Only a short while ago Kendall was a small time private detective, a Private Eye, investigating an insignificant little murder with no clues, no witnesses, and no motive. In fact, no nothing. Now he had so many pieces of a puzzle he didn’t know how they fitted together. He didn’t even know if they all came from the same puzzle.

The Marinski Affair




 ISBN-13: 978-1481102476

ISBN-10: 1481102478

The Marinski Affair began as a dull mundane case involving a missing husband. Okay, so he was a rich missing husband, but he was nonetheless, still only a missing husband. The case soon developed into one involving robbery, kidnapping, blackmail and murder. But was there really a kidnapping? And exactly who is blackmailing who? Who actually carried out the robbery? Who committed the murders? Who can you trust? Who can you believe? Is anyone actually telling the truth? What have they got to hide? And what connection was there with a jewel theft that occurred four years previously? All is not as it seems. Tom Kendall, private detective, had the task of solving the mystery. He was usually pretty good at solving puzzles, but this one was different, somehow. It wasn’t that he didn’t have any of the pieces. Oh no, he wasn’t short of clues. It was just that none of the pieces seemed to fit together.






 ISBN: – 978-1291316032

Tom Kendall, a down to earth private detective, is asked to investigate the death of a young newspaper reporter. The evidence shows quite clearly that it was an accident: a simple, dreadful accident. That is the finding of the coroner and the local police. Furthermore, there were two witnesses. They saw the whole thing. But was it an accident, or was it something more sinister? Against a backdrop of a viral epidemic slowly spreading from Central America, a simple case soon places Kendall up against one of the largest drug companies in the country.


Killing in the city


To make a killing in the City’ is a phrase often used within the financial world, to indicate making a large profit on investments, or through dealings on the stock market – the bigger the profit, the bigger the killing. However, Tom Kendall, a private detective, on holiday in London, has a different kind of killing in mind when he hears about the death of one of his fellow passengers who travelled with him on the plane from Miami. It was suicide apparently, a simple overdose of prescribed tablets. Kendall immediately offers his help to Scotland Yard. He is shocked when he is told his services will not be required. They can manage perfectly well without him, thank you.

The Kammersee Affair

The lake was flat and calm, with barely a ripple. Its dark waters glistening, reflecting the moonlight, as though it were a mirror. Fritz Marschall knew that neither he, nor his friend, should really have been there. They, like many others before them, had been attracted to the lake by the many rumors that had been circulating. He thought of the endless stories there had been, of treasures sunken in, or buried around the lake. He recalled the stories of the lake being used to develop torpedoes and rockets during the war. Looking out across the dark water, he wondered what secrets were hidden beneath the surface.

The Thackery Journal

On the night of April 14th 1865 President Abraham Lincoln was attending a performance at The Ford Theatre, in Washington. A single shot fired by John Wilkes Booth hit the President in the back of the head. He slumped to the floor, and died a few hours later without recovering consciousness. Was Booth a lone assassin? Or was he part of a wider conspiracy? What if Booth had merely been a willing party to a plot to replace Lincoln with General Ulysses S. Grant. Let us suppose that Booth had been set up by a group of men, a group of Lincoln’s own Army Generals; Generals who had wanted Ulysses S Grant for their President, and not Lincoln. And let us also suppose that the funding for the assassination had come from gold stolen by the Confederate Army.



 Tom Kendall had been with the 32nd Precinct, New York Police Department for just under ten years. But now he wanted a change. Now he wanted to start his own Private Detective Agency. He had grand ideas. He wasn’t interested in just any old case. Oh no, he would handle only the big time cases, the expensive ones.

He would be able to take his pick, the ones that he wanted, where the stakes were high and so were the rewards. He knew exactly the kind of case that he wanted. Anything else would not do, and it would just be turned down flat.


 I’d like to thank Jane Risdon for this opportunity to share my World Wide Work In Progress Blog Tour experience with you all on her blog.  I do hope you will leave your thoughts and comments fur us both her.  Thanks so much for coming by to read about me.  I do hope you enjoy my books and that you will let me know.

Jane Risdon

I would like to nominate fellow author

        to take part in the WW WIP Blog Tour on 11th August 2014.

Thanks John for sharing your Work in Progress with us.  This has been so interesting.

I do hope you will follow these links and read all about John’s nominated authors.


**Please don’t forget to read all about my second nomination for the WW WIP Blog Tour: 


who has an equally exciting post which I’ve also added HERE today.

Like JOHN HOLT, TC does not have a blog but does have a very interesting Fan Page on Facebook.

Find JOHN HOLT on Facebook:



World Wide Work in Progress Blog Tour – 28th July 2014

The World Wide ‘Work In Progress’ Blog Tour 28th July 2014 

View of The Trident, The Oberoi hotels, Mumbai (c) Risdon 2014 - The White Haired Man

View of The Trident and The Oberoi Hotels, Mumbai: (c) Risdon 2014 – The White Haired Man

Today I’ve been tagged by Maggie Thom to take part in

 The Word Wide WIP Blog  Tour.

She’s asked me to share information about one of my Works in Progress with you.

You can find out about Maggie and her writing, blogging, and her books over at:

Many thanks Maggie, for asking me to share some information about myself and for setting such challenging questions for me to answer.

So, first things first – a little about myself for those who are new here, and for those who are not, my apologies; talk amongst yourselves whilst I deal with this part of the WWWIP.

(you are allowed to make tea, sing, or mess around on Facebook for a moment or two if you don’t want to chat to the others – I won’t say a word to them; honest)

Trident Hotel Mumbai (c) Risdon 2008

Trident Hotel Mumbai (c) Risdon 2008

 The White Haired Man – another WIP

Those of you who’ve visited before will know that after a career working in Government Agencies and then the International Music Industry, during which time I harboured a longing to write fiction, I eventually managed to find time for myself with the peace and quiet to actually get on with it.  That was a couple of  years ago and since then I have been writing mainly  Crime/mystery novels, short stories, and dabbling in flash fiction from time to time.

However, every now and again when the mood takes me I do write stories in other genres;  stories just pop out and I have to be content with whatever I find  myself writing.

I’ve had five stories published in three anthologies to date and I have four stories being appraised for a further two anthologies, to be published later this year.

Fingers crossed.

 You won’t fail to have noticed – if you wander around my blog – that I am writing a Crime/mystery novel called Ms Birdsong Investigates, about a former MI5 Officer who is ‘voluntarily’ retired following a little bit of trouble (messed up mission), and finds herself in the rural village of Ampney Parva in The Vale of The White Horse, where, before long, old habits can’t be resisted, and she is soon up to her Victoria’s Secret underwear in murder…..but that’s another WIP which has turned into a series; hence the time it is taking me to write it.

So to answer Maggie’s questions:

Question one:  What am I working on?

Well, I’ve just mentioned one WIP (my main one) and there are several other projects all in various stages of completion – I know, I need to finish stuff, but I am a little unconventional; don’t remind me.

I thought I’d tell you about another major story I am working on, inspired by the terrible events in Mumbai when terrorists slaughtered so many people in the city in 2008.

Taj Hotel Restaurant, Mumbai before the terrible events. (c) Risdon 2008

Taj Hotel Restaurant, Mumbai before the terrible events. (c) Risdon 2008

I have personal reasons for writing this story which will become clear once the story is written and, hopefully, published.

I’ve called it The White Haired Man

Set in Mumbai in the Bollywood Movie industry which is thriving and makes more movies than Hollywood each year, my story

deals with the after-math of the Mumbai Terrorist attacks on the Luxury Hotels and the Railway Station, and how it changes the lives of two English men forever

when they meet

The White Haired Man.

Question two:  How does this differ from other genres? 

This is a hard one.  I am sure there are plenty of stories set in India and possibly about the Mumbai terrorist attacks, but I guess mine differs in that it is almost a personal account of the experiences of two English people caught up in the mayhem; who lose everything, and end up being taken under the wing of a local Crime boss who has fingers in all sorts of pies – including the Bollywood Movie Industry. 

Obviously being a story I bend the truth and actual events shamelessly. 

It is quite shocking at times, with all the colour and flavour of India but with some of the darker, seedier sides of life revealed.

It is a Crime novel with humour and tragedy and lots of insights into the way Bollywood, indeed Indian society, works.

Victoria Terminus, Mumbai (c) Risdon  2008

Victoria Terminus, Mumbai (c) Risdon 2008

Question three:  Why do I write what I write?

Another hard one to answer.  I guess because it is what I know.  Not that I move in the criminal world or have personal experiences of murder, but I read a lot of Crime and Mystery, as well as Spy and Espionage thrillers.  I am partial to novels about Organised Crime (Mafia/Triads for example) and so I fell into this genre because of a love of it.  My early career working in the Civil Service and then, later, the Music Business affords me ample material.

Kala Ghoda area of Mumbai - where The White Haired Man has his offices (c) Risdon 2008

Kala Ghoda area of Mumbai – where The White Haired Man has his offices (c) Risdon 2008

Question four:  How does my writing process work?

Good question and I would like to know the answer as well. 

I am not someone with millions of stories buzzing around in their head just bursting to come out.  There isn’t an itch I need to scratch.

I often need some sort of trigger.  It might be a conversation or it could be a News item, or if I see something happening around me or hear about it happening to others.

Sometimes I get flash-backs to something that happened on tour with bands, or during meetings with the high fliers in Hollywood for example, and suddenly I have a story.

 Perhaps something  will fester in the back of my mind for a brief period.

View from The Grant Road Mission, Mumbai in The White Haired Man (c) Jane Risdon 2014

View from The Grant Road Mission, Mumbai in The White Haired Man (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Often I will sit at the keyboard and open Word and stare at the page with the feeling I should write something. 

The first thing I usually get is the title and suddenly off I go.  I do not plan, draw up lists, post notes all over the room or prepare in any way. 

I might write notes as I go along so I can recall names, places, and events and I have been known to draw a map.  Only because I might forget some crucial detail what with all the excitement and what have you!

Once I start to write it all flows out.  I’ll have the vaguest notion of  where the story is going. I possibly know the type of crime, that there is a victim, and a perpetrator (often the ‘who’ is a surprise to me) and the end writes itself and the characters are born as I type.  Not very high-brow, literary, or the best way to write perhaps, but is how I write.

If you find any of this worthy of further investigation please check out two of the anthologies I have contributed towards, still on sale:

In A Word: Murder

Out in Paperback 14th February 2014 on and

The USA Paperback version is available via

The USA Kindle version is available via

 The UK Paperback version is available via

The UK Kindle is available via

I Am Woman Vol. One

Unfortunately, Telling Tales is no longer in print.

You might follow links on my blog to Morgen Bailey’s Writing Blog

where you will discover some of my Flash Fiction, Short Stories and an article on Song writing, or you can scroll through my Blog and discover little bits and pieces here, including various interviews and where I have been Guest Blogger/Author.

Once more thanks to Maggie Thom

for asking me to undertake the World Wide WIP Tour.  Do pop across to her blog and find out about her books and her guests.

I nominate author John Holt

 to undertake the WW WIP Tour on August 4th.

John does not have a blog (yet) but he does have a Facebook page and lots of books available.

*August 4th 2014 – John’s contribution to the WW WIP will be accessible on my blog.  I do

hope you will pop back here and see what he has to say about his prolific writing career.

Thanks everyone for visiting here.  I am still working hard on submissions, hence I have been rather quieter here than usual.

Normal service will be resumed soon.

Bedgebury National Pinetum (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Bedgebury National Pinetum (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Undergoing Some Changes: but business as usual


I hope the sun is shining on you wherever you are.

Taken by me this week (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Taken by me this week (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Just popped in to say that there are some areas of my blog which might not be accessible for a very short time

 I am making some changes behind the scenes and so it has been necessary to limit access to some areas.

Normal service will be resumed as soon as possible.

There is still lots to see and read so do keep popping in to visit – you know I appreciate all your visits and comments .

Meantime perhaps you’d like to visit some of the Blogs where I have been interviewed  recently, or have contributed to a Guest Blogger Spot.

Research (c) Jane Risdon 2012

Research (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Here are the links:

Fiona McVie’s blog:

 Megan Cyrulewski (authorsupportingauthors) blog:

and I took part in The Writing Process Blog Tour

invited by Jane Dougherty to take part – you will find the post right here on my blog – 16th June 2014.

Jane Dougherty can be found over at :

Of course there have been other interviews and Guest spots over time – here are a few of them with their links:

Made it Moment (Suspend Your Disbelief) on Jenny Milchman’s blog:

I’m also featured on her blog – The Writing Life:

Tea and Talk at Sally Lunn’s on Jo Lambert’s blog:

Back in the day - Recording Studio with SSL Desk (c) Jane Risdon 1991

(c) Jane Risdon 2014

Centre Stage (Romance That Rocks The World) on Nicky Wells blog:

and I did another interview with Nicky Wells:

Special mics for special singers (c) Jane Risdon 2012

Special mics for special singers (c) Jane Risdon 2012

I wrote an article about Song-writing at the request of Morgen Bailey and you can find it under Guest blog posts – #226:

 Morgen Bailey’s Writing Blog over at:

Vintage Stereo Gibson SG - Jake's favourite Guitar in Dreamer (c) Jane Risdon 2008

Vintage Stereo Gibson SG – Jake’s favourite Guitar in Dreamer (c) Jane Risdon 2008

You can find my interview with Carol Bond over at theunseenpromise blog and read one of my short stories there:

You can also find some of my pieces of Flash Fiction over on Morgen Baileys Writing Blog/Pod Casts – go to her menu and Flash Fiction Friday and Pod-casts for links to them:

Vegas or Moscow: one record company and lots of suitors

Crime/mystery – stories to thrill you.

And of course, Morgen is a writer as well as a blogger so do check her work out whilst there….and the work of my other kind hosts.

So there’s a lot to keep you occupied if you wish to find out more about me and my writing.

There are more interviews and Guest blog spots on the way soon….meantime I am back to submissions for publishers (deep joy!).

Be good, keep safe and happy and enjoy your day.  Thanks for being here.   

All photos and content (c) Jane Risdon 2014 – All Rights Reserved.

(c) Jane Risdon 2014

Where am I up to now? Oh Yes….

Bridge to where?  (c) Jane Risdon 2013

A journey (c) Jane Risdon 2013

You may be wondering what I have been up to since my last update here, well….

When we last had a natter here I was preparing material to submit to various publishers more in hope than expectation, but that’s the name of the game.

I am prepared;  after-all, years of preparing and presenting material and artists to Record Companies has given me more than enough experience of having to keep trying and if all fails, try again!

Not that I think I am going to fail.  Not at all.  But I know how these things work and it is all about being in the right place at the right time, targeting the right company and the right person working there. Oh, and having what they want. 

Being a mind-reader helps.

When it was Music I knew the who, the what and the when; placing my novels and short stories is another matter.  I’ve read, listened, and asked advice, and I think I understand what to do – it is the ‘to whom’ part which is stumping me. 

 I think I need an Agent.

I’m groaning loudly as I write this – why?  Because I used to tell hopeful song-writers, singers, and musicians to get themselves a Manager if they wanted to be taken seriously and to have their material ‘shopped and presented,’ to suitable companies in a professional and credible manner by someone with status and reputation;  someone with vision, an idea of the market-place and how to garner fans and sales – someone with a plan.

I can just hear myself turning down artists for management –  offering all sorts of advice on how to prepare, improve, and target the right people,  after making the best record or writing the best song ever – and seeing their faces drop.  

Now the boot is on the other foot.

I am a hopeful creator in need of representation and a champion!

I’ve found  publishers who are accepting unsolicited material and have dipped the corners of my work into their world.  And now I have to wait and wait – mostly until September apparently, or until I give up waiting because they don’t reply unless interested.

Oh! how well I understand this.  That is why I was the one to go into the Record Companies at the highest levels (president, chairman, whatever) and do the presentation, selling of an artist, their material, their image and their prospects for massive sales and world domination.

If only I could  find a ‘Me’.

Desk with a view (c) Jane Risdon 2012

Desk with a view (c) Jane Risdon 2012

So far I haven’t, but then I’ve not really looked yet.  I am testing the water, dipping my toe in, trying my luck – whatever – with those open to being approached.

So far I have sent a series of short stories off to a couple of Publishers; one large House and one medium sized House.

I am preparing a novel to go off before the end of the given period for ‘open submissions.’

I’ve done the Bio, the cover letters, the synopsis and the required number of chapters/pages requested and I am on the verge of nervous collapse, well, not really, but if I had any sense, any idea what I’ve actually done, the enormity of it, well then I might, just might lose the plot completely.

I am about to target Agents too – God help me!

I have lots of ideas for marketing, for creating an awareness, for targeting an audience – the whole package if you like.

Will anyone ever discover this?  Does anyone care?  I have no idea.

But I have to try.

In the meantime I have written two 3,000 word short stories for an anthology – no idea if they’ll accept them at all;  again I won’t know until September (a magical month apparently), and I have been busy editing, checking, re-writing and generally faffing about with everything else I’ve written. 

You’ll get an idea from my previous update.

Oh! and there are now three Ms Birdsong novels on the go; the first one Ms Birdsong Investigates

and two sequels: Murder at the Observatory and The Safe House,

and I am about to begin the prequel to the first one.

I’ve been catching up with Guest blog spots and interviews too – links at the bottom of the page if you are interested.

Let me know what you think.

I think I will hang this round my neck

I think I will hang this round my neck

It’s a good job I don’t need much sleep and lack a social life.

So this is where I find myself at the moment.

Fun or what!

So do tell me, what are you up to – writing or reading? Do share it here with us all.

I’d love to know.

Links:  Fiona McVie Interviewd me over at

Jane Dougherty tagged me in The Writing Process and her link is:

You can read my contribution on my own blog…-it-is-my-turn/

Megan Cyrulewski interviewed me over on Authorsupportingauthors:

Do visit these authors and find out more about them and their books.

In the next few weeks I am being hosted by several other wonderful authors.  More news nearer the time.

Thanks so much for popping in and sharing your thoughts with me.

 (c) Jane Risdon 2013

(c) Jane Risdon 2013

Have a wonderful week.

The Writing Process Blog Tour: today it is my turn

Author Jane Dougherty

has very kindly included me in her Writing Process Blog Tour.

Thanks so much for thinking of me Jane, I really appreciate it.

She has asked me to answer some questions about my writing and would like me to pass the baton on to four other authors I know.

Here Goes:

Question 1:  What are you working on now?

How long have you got Jane?  I am up to my ears in various projects which I’ve written about on my blog from time to time but here goes (again):

Ms Birdsong Investigates (novel):

My Crime/Mystery novel (and eventual series) Ms Birdsong Investigates is my on-going project which I began a while back. 

Lavinia Birdsong is a former MI5 Officer who ‘retired’ from her post under somewhat difficult circumstances and has taken up residence in an Oxfordshire village, Ampney Parva, on the Berkshire Downs not far from the famous White Horse. 

The Vale of the White Horse - Lavinia Birdsong's home on the Berkshire/Oxfordshire Downs

The Vale of the White Horse – Lavinia Birdsong’s home on the Berkshire/Oxfordshire Downs

She has hidden herself away  not wishing to be found by friends and ex-colleagues and especially her enemies.

She has taken up writing to pass the time and cannot help keeping her neighbours under surveillance – old habits die-hard – and soon she finds herself investigating murder in the village.

Whilst I am working on the main novel about Ms B. I have managed – accidentally somehow – to have also written two stand-alone stories involving her:

Murder at the Observatory  (short story):

Solar System (1979) from various NASA spacecraft  (c) NASA 1979

Solar System (1979) from various NASA spacecraft (c) NASA 1979

Inspired by my birthday ‘jolly’ when I had a marvellous time at The Herstmonceux Observatory in Sussex.


The Safe House (short story):

The Safe House (c) Jane Risdon 2014

The Safe House (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Inspired by the venue for a family wedding last year and the ‘secret’ history I uncovered there.

In addition to these stories I have various projects underway including short stories and a couple of novels:

OOW (novel):

1960's - two girls, one musician and a hot band: OOW coming soon.

1960’s – two girls, one musician and a hot band: OOW coming soon.

I am writing a novel with a really good friend of many years who is an award-winning author in her own right.  Our book is an escape from  our respective comfort-zones and for the moment it has a working title of OOW

The book is written from the POV of two women in the late 1960’s so there’s lots of music and fashion and  captures the atmosphere of the time.

It is taking a little longer than we both planned due both of us suffering health-wise – but we are determined to get there.  My contribution is complete.

Then there is:

God’s Waiting Room (series):

Bus Stops feature a lot in my God's Waiting Room series. (c) Jane Risdon 2012

Bus Stops feature a lot in my God’s Waiting Room series. (c) Jane Risdon 2012

For the last couple of years I have been working on a series of stories which I hope will make  several books when completed, called God’s Waiting Room.

This series is not a Crime or Mystery series, but what I call ‘Observational’ stories with a lot of humour. .

The Ghost in the Privy  Featured in my series of God's Waiting Room

The Ghost in the Privy
Featured in my series of God’s Waiting Room

The series is almost complete and I shall have to get down to some serious editing soon.

GWR (God’s Waiting Room) is based on real life people I’ve met and about whom I’ve heard stories over the years from various relations and villagers, and the incidents I mention are all true – well, as true as any tale told to a queue at a bus stop mainly consisting of those in their 80’s and 90’s who have known each other all their lives.

So you see I am working on various other stories and novels  as well as others not mentioned here.  If interested do please refer to my previous posts for information.  Otherwise we’ll be here all day.

Question 2:  How does your work differ from others of its genre?

This is a hard one to answer.  I consider myself a Crime/Mystery writer first and foremost but I do venture into other areas as and when the need to write a particular story grabs me and won’t let go.

When I am wearing my Crime/Mystery writer hat I suppose I think my work is different from others in that a lot of my writing has elements of humour in it and often my characters are often based on real people – I am not sure if other writers have personal experience of some of their characters –  not that I’m saying I know murderers or anyone like that of course, but I do see the dark side of people and use these elements in my work.

Vegas or Moscow: one record company and lots of suitors

Vegas or Moscow: one record company and lots of suitors

I’ve some small knowledge of the world of secrets so I do use what little I know to try to come up with stories with some sort of espionage angle; hence Ms Birdsong is a retired MI5 Officer. 

Thames House home of MI5 (c) attributed to Cnbrb English Language Wikipedia

Thames House home of MI5 (c) attributed to Cnbrb English Language Wikipedia

I cannot say that I am reinventing the wheel however.

Those who read my work will notice that I do love a twist in the tale and so I hope (I aim) to keep people guessing or at least going the wrong way with a few red herrings along the way.

Most of the characters in my other genres are based on real people too – I mentioned God’s Waiting Room earlier as an example.

Group Van 1969 in France (c) Jane Risdon 1969

Group Van in France 1969 – no big trucks in those days. (c) Jane Risdon 1969

OOW is a very real story based on real events and told from the perspective of the two women whose lives are intertwined from their teens onwards.

 I don’t know if anything quite like this has been attempted before.  I’ve not read anything like it.

Both of us being involved closely in Music and sharing similar experiences has made this book a joy for us to write in many ways;  music and fashion and the flavour of the 60’s resonates throughout.

Question 3:  Why do you write what you write?

I really don’t know.

I’ve always wanted to write but having spent so many years working in Music and before that working in the Diplomatic Service, I never found time to really get down to it.

When I was working with musicians and songwriters and producers life was not my own. 

If I wasn’t in a studio recording I was travelling on behalf of the artists we represented or on gruelling tours around the world, barely able to put one foot in front of the other most of the time. 

Vintage Stereo Gibson SG - Jake's favourite Guitar in Dreamer (c) Jane Risdon 2008

Vintage Stereo Gibson SG – Jake’s favourite Guitar in Dreamer (c) Jane Risdon 2008

It was never 9am-5pm; weekends didn’t exist and we never had holidays.

I did however store away little snippets of information and experiences for a later date when I had time to myself.

When that day came I found myself honing in on those experiences which, believe me, didn’t just include music and all that involved. 

So much more goes on which would make the average person’s hair stand on end I am sure. 

Hollywood - Magnet for the young and ambitious. (c) Jane Risdon 1989 -  Hollywood Cover Up (c) 2013

Hollywood – Magnet for the young and ambitious. (c) Jane Risdon 1989 – Hollywood Cover Up (c) 2013

Where there is raw hunger for success and the possibility to make vast wealth, well, you can guess what might happen. 

My other occupation also gave my imagination plenty of fodder for my stories, hence the MI5/espionage angle at times.

I was always advised to write what you know – so I guess that is what I am doing; at least I am trying to do.

Question 4:  How does your writing process work?

Cripes!  Now there you’ve got me.  I am loath to tell you. 

After years of being so organised, especially in the studio working on a track, making a video, or on tour getting everything together for a show; trying to keep the record and publishing companies happy, getting press, radio and television and so forth on board as well as baby-sitting the artists (only joking!), I now seem incapable of behaving in the same way when it comes to my writing.

Spending a lifetime in Music (c) Jane  Risdon 1991

Spending a lifetime in Music (c) Jane Risdon 1991

I am not someone with millions of stories buzzing around in their head just bursting to come out.  There isn’t an itch I need to scratch.

I often need some sort of trigger.  It might be a conversation as I mentioned earlier, or it could be a News item or seeing something happening around me or hearing about it happening to others.

Sometimes I get flash-backs to something that happened on the road or during meetings with the high fliers in Hollywood or elsewhere and suddenly I have a story.

 Something festers in the back of my mind for a brief period.

Often I will sit at the keyboard and open Word and stare at the page with the feeling I should write something. 

Ready to get started (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Ready to get started (c) Jane Risdon 2014

The first thing I usually get is the title and suddenly off I go.  I do not plan, draw up lists, post notes all over the room or prepare in any way. 

I might write notes as I go along so I can recall names, places, and events and I have been known to draw a map.  Only because I might forget some crucial detail what with all the excitement and what have you!

  Ampney Parva is a real village to me so I know where the Pub and church are situated and who lives next door or opposite, and I know the style of Lavinia Birdsong’s cottage for example and where the Post Office is in relation to her.

Cob Web Cottage where Ms Birdsong lives in Ampney Parva

Cob Web Cottage where Ms Birdsong lives in Ampney Parva – her dream home.

I make a cup of tea and I write.  It comes from nowhere – just like song-writing does. 

If you’ve ever worked with true songwriters sitting messing round with a guitar or a piano and a piece of paper you will understand.  The song, the story or whatever seems to come from some other place; the ether.

Choice of Mic gives a different feel to a vocal (c) Jane Risdon 2000

Choice of Mic gives a different feel to a vocal (c) Jane Risdon 2000

There are many cups of tea, sometimes there is liquorice.  I walk around a lot, go off and do chores, go out and watch the world go past, go on Facebook more than I should and then I find myself back at the keyboard and I am off again. 

It is quite normal for me to write from 5am through to 1am without eating – I go with the flow.

Sometimes I am out walking in the woods or around old villages or churches, and as I always have a camera with me, I take photos of locations and when I write I look at the photos and these inspire me.

The National Pinetum (c) Jane Risdon 2014

The National Pinetum (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Television or the radio or even someone in the room doesn’t bother me at all.  I am used to working with lots of noise and activity I guess.  I am not precious about my ‘space’ or even where I write.  I can write anywhere as long as I have paper or a computer.

Did I mention tea?  I need lots of tea.

That is my writing process.  Probably not very literary or typical of other writers but it works for me.

So Jane Dougherty, this is how this Jane undertakes The Writing Process. 

Thanks for asking me to share this with you.

 Now I want to ask everyone reading this to visit her blog and find out about her work and also the blogs and work of the writers I’ve invited to follow on from me.

Please check out and support:

Susan Finlay

Pamela Griffiths

DS Nelson

Jo Lambert

Many thanks to Jane Dougherty once more, it’s been a blast.

Jane Dougherty

My work can be found in various places including:

Morgen Bailey’s Writing Blog:

Where you will find some of my short stories and pieces of flash fiction published and pod-casts.

And in these books:

In A Word: Murder

Out in Paperback 14th February 2014 on and

The USA Paperback version is available via

The USA Kindle version is available via

 The UK Paperback version is available via

The UK Kindle is available via


I Am Woman Volume 1

I Am Woman Volume 1 Anthology


Telling Tales Anthology featuring two of my stories: The Debt Collector and The Ghost in the Privy

As ever you can find me over on Facebook

Father’s Day – don’t forget In A Word: Murder

In A Word: Murder. Published 3rd November 2013.  Crime Anthology

In A Word: Murder. Published 3rd November 2013. Crime Anthology

I’ve dropped in today just to remind you about a super Father’s Day gift:


a Crime Anthology featuring some really FAB stories by writers from all over the world

which is available via Kindle and Paperback from and

Not only will your Father be over the moon with some really great reading matter but he will be content in the knowledge that the gift you gave gift has gone towards helping someone at the end of their life being cared for in The Princess Alice Hospice in Surrey.

The USA Paperback version is available via

The USA Kindle version is available via

 The UK Paperback version is available via

The UK Kindle is available via

I call this the gift which keeps on giving.

 Do please consider giving this book to someone you love – and help someone else’s loved-one too.

Many thanks

Jane x

Oh and I am being interviewed today over on Fiona McVie’s blog:

Do pop in and say hello, leave a comment there, and let me know what you think – comment here.


Updating progress so far: ticking boxes


Raging Torrent perform in The Stalker

Raging Torrent perform in The Stalker

It’s been a busy week or two but I thought I’d stop by with a little update as to how I am getting on with things.  The last time we met I posted a long list of things I am hoping to achieve this summer.

I am so happy to say that I have completed the short story I was invited to write, and which is now under consideration by a Charity hoping to publish an anthology at the end of the year.

It’s called

The Stalker

It is  3,000 words long and is set in Hollywood and features Raging Torrent, a successful Rock band, their lead singer, Birdie, and his girlfriend, Julie, who arrives from Seattle in search of fame and fortune and all the trappings that go with it.

Music, Musicians Fame and Riches (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Music, Musicians Fame and Riches (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Glamour, music, fast cars with a twist in the tale.

Hopefully this will be accepted.  Fingers crossed. I won’t know until September.

If Music be the means to an on!

If Music be the means to an end… on!

Happily I can report that I have completed a ‘stand alone’ Ms Birdsong Investigates short story which I’ve called

The Safe House.

You may recall a wedding I attended last year in a huge country house miles from anywhere with over 6,000 acres of woodlands, fields, and beautifully laid-out grounds, which was not what it seemed.

Seclusion, Surveillance and secrets. (c) Jane Risdon 2014

Seclusion, Surveillance and secrets. (c) Jane Risdon 2014

As I wandered around the house and the grounds and chatted to the ‘staff’ I began to realise just what sort of ‘house’ it really is.  Most of the time it is a conference centre and a place where Governments can meet in seclusion and away from prying eyes.  Now and again it is used as a wedding venue – the reason why I was there. 

The Safe House (c) Jane Risdon 2014

The Safe House (c) Jane Risdon 2014

A story began to take shape as I walked around the house and grounds and suddenly I could see Ms Birdsong there, attending a wedding just like me.  She is there under sufferance and not too happy with the way the event is turning out when she sees someone – someone out-of-place. She’s never quite got used to being ‘retired’ from MI5 and cannot stop herself from making it her business to find out more.

I hope to publish this in the summer.

I’ve sent off Vegas or Moscow to the publishers in the USA. 


(c) Bporter28 Downtown Las Vegas

Not holding my breath but you’ve got to be in it to win it as I am constantly being told.

Vegas or Moscow: one record company and lots of suitors

Vegas or Moscow: one record company and lots of suitors

This is  another Music business story, this time about Payola and what almost  ‘taking the Fifth,’  eventually costs a Record Company and their owners.

I won’t know until September.  Phew!

Trident Hotel Mumbai (c) Risdon 2008

Trident Hotel Mumbai (c) Risdon 2008

Set in Mumbai in the Bollywood Movie industry which is thriving and makes more movies than Hollywood each year, my story

deals with the after-math of the Mumbai Terrorist attacks on the Luxury Hotels and the Railway Station there, and how it changes the lives of two English men forever

when they meet

The White Haired Man.

View from The Grant Road Mission, Mumbai in The White Haired Man (c) Jane Risdon 2014

View from The Grant Road Mission Mumbai in The White Haired Man (c) Jane Risdon 2014

I have hit the 10,000 word mark and I’m aiming for 15,000-20,000 before it ends.

Watch this space.

The Vale of the White Horse - Lavinia Birdsong's home on the Berkshire/Oxfordshire Downs

The Vale of the White Horse – Lavinia Birdsong’s home on the Berkshire/Oxfordshire Downs


Murder at the Observatory

(a Ms Birdsong Investigates story)

is also at around 15,000 words so far and again I am aiming for about 20,000. 

Earth in the distance seen from the Lunar surface (c) NASA 1969

Earth in the distance seen from the Lunar surface (c) NASA 1969

This is another stand-alone story inspired by my birthday ‘Jolly’ to Herstmonceux Observatory in March.  I hope to complete it early June.

Wayland Smithy near White Horse Hill Uffington, Oxfordshire.

Wayland Smithy near White Horse Hill Uffington, Oxfordshire.

The story takes place at the Ridgeway Observatory near Ampney Parva – Ms Birdsong has a cottage in the village – and around The Vale of The White Horse, Dragon Hill and Waylands Smithya Neolithic longbarrow.

In addition to the above I am compiling my first Crime Anthology and preparing various stories to go out to publishers, so the last few weeks have been really busy and I don’t see any let-up throughout June.

Now and again I get to go for a wonderful walk in the countryside which helps refresh the parts in need of perking up.

Just so you know I’ve not been twiddling my thumbs since we last chatted.

Well, that is it for now.

Have a great week everyone.

Let’s meet here again soon.




Dancing Around Our Zimmer Frames with Generation Z

Let's Mosh Tonight

Let’s Mosh Tonight

Dancing Around Our Zimmer Frames with Generation Z

(c) Jane Risdon 2013

Since writing this piece in 2013, I have had several people read it again and mention it to me. The subject often comes up when talking about music and what life in a Residential Home might be for the Baby Boomers when they get to ‘that’ age.

I thought I’d share it again.  

I hope you enjoy it and it gets you thinking.  

I think we should start a movement to ensure that such places have a decent music collection available for those of us born in the 1950s and after,  for whom George Formby and Pearl Johnson and Teddy Carr – wonderful in their day –  is the stuff of nightmares.

At primary school we had Country dancing lessons and it was a good opportunity for the boys to grab the girls and fling them from one end of the gymnasium to the other when the ‘Caller,’ shouted, ‘Change partners.’

Later, at the Convent school we didn’t have dancing as it probably meant ‘touching’ each other, but we did dance around the May pole, trying not to tangle the ribbons or go the wrong way, which is a special feat one of my sisters still manages much to the totally cringing embarrassment of her children.

When we celebrated the crowning of Mary, Queen of The May, we sort of skipped about a bit in our white dresses, all very proper,  overseen by The Mother Superior, so there wasn’t any opportunity to grab or be grabbed.

Big school saw us learning how to do the ‘Dashing White Sergeant,’ and ‘The Gay Gordons,’ – nope, not a Gay Scottish dance! I was a dab hand at the ‘Valeta Snowball,’ in spite of the boys still wanting to fling me from one side of the Gym to the other whenever we had to be twirled.

About the same time as we were tripping the light fantastic with our pubescent male partners, The Beatles and Chubby Checker were doing ‘The Twist,’ and up and down the country the sexes danced apart and around each other.  Our school dances saw us all ‘twisting’ and ‘shaking it up baby,’  and doing ‘The March of The Mods,’ under the watchful eyes of various teachers, ensuring we didn’t ‘shake it up,’ too much behind the bike sheds in between dances.

Meantime, at various family weddings our parents still waltzed up and down, jitter-bugged and attempted to ‘Walk the dog,’ and ‘Do the locomotion,’ much to the horror of their children who watched ‘the oldies,’ making complete idiots of themselves.  I can recall my Dad nearly slipping a disc doing ‘The Twist,’ and hobbling off the dance floor much to my great relief, before I died of embarrassment in front of all the eligible young men I’d discovered lurking near the bar.

Towards the middle to late nineteen sixties something called a Discotheque appeared and every town had one so it seemed.  Our nearest town had one every Sunday afternoon in the old dance hall where my parents had quick stepped to the likes of Edmundo Ros, and smooched to Nat King Cole, when they were courting.

We were the generation who hoped ‘We all die before we get old,’ and who cringed at anyone over twenty-five, who we deemed ‘too old and over the hill,’ to know anything about life and us – teenagers.  We died of shame at them dancing, or behaving like we did.

The Discotheque (not known as a Disco at that time), was a cool place to hang out.  We could listen to the latest Singles and Long Playing Records (later known as albums), whilst checking out the opposite sex from underneath our Cathy McGowan fringes and Dusty Springfield blacked eyes, faces pale with Max Factor foundation, across the distance of table and chairs grouped round the outside of the dance floor.  There was something we all thought so sophisticated – from Italy – called Espresso (coffee), and we also had Pepsi Cola and Coca Cola in long-necked bottles with straws.  Such decadence.

The boys didn’t dance, they just stood and watched the girls and smoked.  The girls danced self-consciously in pairs or groups of four or five, around their handbags piled in the middle of them, on the floor.  There was a whole lot of shaking going on to The Mersey Beats,  The Beatles,  The Swinging Blue Jeans, Herman’s Hermits, The Walker Brothers, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, and the latest music from America; Sam and Dave, Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett, and all the Motown and Phil Spector bands and vocalists who were so new and exciting.  Suddenly we didn’t want to listen to Frank Ifield, Matt Munro or Frank Sinatra.

Summer of Love

Summer of Love

Woodstock and the Isle of Wight festivals led us into long flowing robes, free love and flower-power and boys with hair to their shoulders and hips to die for. We danced and swayed to Dylan,  Joan Baez, and Peter, Paul and Mary and Barry McGuire, who reminded us we were all ‘On the Eve of Destruction.’  No-one held each other to dance, everyone ‘did their own thing.’

It was The Summer of Love and we weren’t going to miss out.

Slam diving, stage diving, and moshing took over eventually and boys were back in the game, dancing on their own, throwing themselves around like the demented.  Girls stood and watched and kept money ready to make the 999 phone call to  summon an ambulance if one of them misjudged the crowd, and landed on their head and not in the arms of their mates, when they launched themselves off of speaker stacks and high stages.

Disco bounced into our lives with Donna Summer, The Bee Gees and John Travolta and we were all strutting our stuff under the mirrored globes in nightclubs, where lighted floors, strobes and laser lighting created monsters of us all, reflected in the mirrored walls.  Everyone dressed to impress.  Image was the thing.  We all had a swagger to our walk and the boys knew how to swagger the most.

By this time our children were ‘disco’ mad too and it was our turn to be the ‘oldies,’  not safe out alone and certainly not allowed on the dance floor in polite company.  They were ‘Dirty Dancing’ to ‘Fame,’ and ‘Grease,’ and  holding your partner became all the rage again.  But not for parents.  That was deemed ‘gross,’ and a step too far.

TV shows featuring ballroom dancing, Latin American dancing and everything in-between has taken off in a big way. 

When I was young we could watch Victor Silvester on his TV show ‘Come Dancing,’ – all sequins and taffeta – but only on a black and white set.

Which brings me to afternoon tea dances which are becoming more and more popular now, not that I could ever imagine myself at one, but people are going to them again.  I am not sure which generation.

Then I wonder about myself and my generation.  We still listen to the music of our youth, and our children enjoy it too, but we also listen to their music as well.  I think about my mother’s generation and The Big Bands of the nineteen forties and Rock and Roll of the nineteen fifties.

Whenever you see a nursing home or a retirement home on TV these days, the music they are singing along to is the music of their generation; Sinatra, Crosby and Guy Mitchell, Patsy Cline and so on.  They sing along to the piano player pounding out ‘Knees up mother Brown,’ and ‘Roll out the Barrel,’ and  I get a funny sensation as I wonder what my generation will be singing along to when we are in  nursing homes and the ‘entertainment’ turns up.

I have a vision of a row of tattooed women with face piercings, dancing around their Zimmer frames, watched by rows of elderly men, similarly tattooed and pierced, in sweat-shirts and jeans, longing for a joint and  a pint, singing along to ‘Rock and Roll,’ by Led Zeppelin, ‘My Generation,’ by The Who and ‘Dancing Queen,’ by Abba….followed by ‘God Save the Queen,’ by the Sex Pistols.   A ‘mosh pit,’ would be in the middle of the room and those brave enough and whose knees still worked, would try to launch themselves off of the leg rests of their geriatric recliners, shouting ‘Up the revolution.’ 

Outside,  Para-medics would be busy loading exhausted ‘Generation Zimmer,’ into their ambulances. For a change they are not being abused and sworn at – shouts of ‘peace and love’ would fill the air with offers to share a spliff – for medicinal purpose of course.  

Now there’s a thought.

Rock on.


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,231 other followers